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*August 2009 COTM* OTTOLENGHI: Meat and Fish

Caitlin McGrath Aug 3, 2009 02:03 PM

Our Chowhound August 2009 Cookbook of the Month is Ottolenghi: The Cookbook, by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi; and all online recipes by the authors.

Please post your full-length recipe reviews here for dishes from the cookbook chapter Meat and Fish, and online recipes with those ingredients.

Please mention the name of the recipe you are reviewing and the page number, or include a link to the online recipe, if possible, as well as any modifications you made to the recipe. Let us know if you would like to make the recipe again, and if you would change anything in the future, too.

Please see the main Cookbook of the Month thread for some useful links.

Lists of the recipes from these book sections, along with links where applicable, and the opportunity to request paraphrases, may be found at these links:

Lamb, beef and pork: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/641703#4914028

Poultry: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/641703#4914032

Fish and shellfish: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/6417...

A reminder that the verbatim copying of recipes to the boards is a violation of the copyright of the original author. Posts with copied recipes will be removed.


Thanks for participating and enjoy!

  1. Rubee Aug 3, 2009 02:56 PM

    Chicken with Sumac, Za'atar and Lemon, p. 122

    I made this back in March because of all the raves. As I mentioned in that Ottolenghi thread, I thought this was moist and flavorful. It's also a quick and easy weeknight dish as you can marinate overnight, and then just sprinkle with za'atar and pop it in the oven at 400 for about 45 minutes for dinner. To serve, garnish with pine nuts sauteed in butter and chopped parsley. I thought the flavors were delicious too - I marinated chicken leg quarters in garlic, sliced lemon, chicken stock, olive oil, cinnamon, allspice, sumac, and red onion.

    Pic:
    http://www.chow.com/photos/290348

    On-line recipe link:
    http://thecookbookgeek.blogspot.com/2...

    32 Replies
    1. re: Rubee
      Caitlin McGrath Aug 3, 2009 03:08 PM

      I really like this recipe, as well, and agree with you on all counts: moist, flavorful, and easy. I've used thighs, and it holds up well as leftovers. Once, I chunked up some zucchini and tossed it in, coating it with the marinade, for more of a one-dish effect. That worked really well.

      1. re: Caitlin McGrath
        oakjoan Aug 3, 2009 05:16 PM

        I third this rec. I just made it again for a dinner party last Saturday night. I used breasts, thighs, and wings (cut in two).

        I especially like it with kosheri (can't remember if it's w "y" or an "i" ending and am too lazy to check) - it's the dish with basmathi rice, vermicelli and lots of caramelized onions which is served with a tangy tomato sauce. I made a big salad and served homemade frozen yoghurt flavored with vanilla and lemon and topped with some really good chopped plums and peaches.

        1. re: oakjoan
          d
          dkennedy Aug 10, 2009 01:39 PM

          I am going to jump on the Chicken with sumac, za'atar and lemon bandwagon. I love the idea about adding zucchini to the sauce mentioned above, I think the flavors would really pair well together.

          My favorite part about this dish was the way the lemon, rind and all, kind of caramelizes so it makes a mouthwatering treat evey time you eat a bite with a lemon in it.

          My one wish is that the skin could have crisped up a bit. I think I may try to reduce the cooking time but kick up the heat 1/2 way through cooking to see if I can have the best of both worlds. Its a gamble though, because I wouldn't want to do anything that interferes with the moistness of this chicken.

          1. re: dkennedy
            Becca Porter Mar 22, 2014 10:27 AM

            Y'all have convinced me to place a Penzey's order for sumac and za'atar.... Plus a lot of other things of course.

            I can't wait to try this.

            1. re: Becca Porter
              jen kalb Mar 23, 2014 07:34 PM

              you might want to look at what kalustyan offers - their Jordanian zaatar is particularly good (they have several types)

      2. re: Rubee
        JoanN Aug 3, 2009 06:24 PM

        I made this a week or so ago when a young woman from Latin America, with not very adventurous tastes, was staying with me for a week. I was rather apprehensive serving to her a dish with spices she certainly wasn’t used to. I was just thrilled that she really liked it. A lot. The leftovers didn’t hold up quite as well as I had hoped they would. Has anyone had a good leftover experience with this dish? Any tips? Since I rarely buy chicken parts, having usable leftovers is pretty much a must for me.

        1. re: JoanN
          Caitlin McGrath Aug 3, 2009 06:36 PM

          I ate my leftovers the next day, and thought they came out fine after heating in the microwave. The skin wasn't crisp, but the chicken had browned very nicely when cooked. This was thighs only, so dark meat, and higher proprtion of meat to bone than other parts.

          1. re: Caitlin McGrath
            oakjoan Aug 3, 2009 07:35 PM

            My leftovers have also been fine, although not crispy. My husband takes them to work. The wings I used in the latest version were also delicious cold a couple of days later.

            1. re: oakjoan
              greedygirl Aug 4, 2009 03:39 AM

              Add me to the list of fans. So good and so easy.

              1. re: greedygirl
                d
                dkennedy Aug 6, 2009 11:06 AM

                I made this dish two weeks ago and I agree that the flavors were wonderful, but I was disappointed that the skin did not crips up. Any tips on how to crisp the skin while keeping the meat so wonderfully moist?

        2. re: Rubee
          c
          cpw Aug 10, 2009 12:28 PM

          My turn to make this highly recommended dish and it was just lovely. I was more happy that my husband liked it, as he is not a big chicken fan and he absolutely it.
          Its a win win as tonight he gets the chicken left overs and I get the lamb leftovers!

          1. re: Rubee
            jen kalb Aug 17, 2009 01:29 PM

            I have a mixed reaction, having made this with a big spanish lemon with thick pith. The resulting dish was bitter and I had to pull out the lemon slices. I also was dissatisfied with the za'atar I used - it also contributed a bitterness. and I think I put on too much I would modify this next time to use only the rind and flesh of the lemons - or simply use a thinner-pithed lemon. Chicken was tender and good

            1. re: jen kalb
              buttertart Aug 18, 2009 10:29 AM

              I didn't like this nearly as much as the chicken with hazelnuts and saffron. I made my own za'atar from a recipe in Mediterranean Hot and Spicy by Aglaia Kremezi (another good book) - found the amount of thyme overwhelmed the other flavors. Also, perhaps this would work better as a sauté - I'm not crazy about the way the onions came out of the oven, rather desiccated.

              1. re: buttertart
                greedygirl Aug 18, 2009 02:25 PM

                Maybe your za'atar is heavy on the thyme? I didn't find there was an overwhelming flavour of thyme at all.

                1. re: greedygirl
                  buttertart Aug 19, 2009 06:21 AM

                  I'm going to try a blend from our local temple of spices, Kalustyan's, and give it another go.

                  1. re: buttertart
                    Gio Aug 31, 2009 07:26 AM

                    Chicken with Sumac, Za'atar and Lemon, p. 122

                    I made my own Za'atar mix for this delicious recipe using sesame seeds that I ground and no thyme. Anyway, we thought it was delicious and very easy to make. Served with steamed baby red potatoes dressed with S & P EVOO and a sprinkle of za'atar.... along with what I call Dry-Fried Zucchini.
                    I love his chicken recipes!!

                    1. re: Gio
                      The Dairy Queen Aug 31, 2009 08:09 AM

                      It's nice to have recipes that can take something like chicken, which can be so bland and mundane, and make it extraordinary.

                      ~TDQ

                      1. re: Gio
                        Caitlin McGrath Aug 31, 2009 01:02 PM

                        Gio, what was in your za'atar mix besides sesame seeds? I'm just curious, given that dried thyme is usually the principal ingredient of za'atar. Za'atar sometimes contains sumac, sometimes not (Ottolenghi and Tamimi refer to the kind without in their ingredient section, which is presumably why this recipe calls separately for sumac), but always thyme and sesame seeds, according to every reference I've found.

                        Of course, my question is just out of curiosity, not a criticism! I was wondering if you used a recipe without thyme or just chose not to use it.

                        1. re: Caitlin McGrath
                          Gio Sep 2, 2009 05:53 PM

                          Caitlin... I'm an idiot. I DID use thyme in the Za'atar recipe. I didn't have my notes in front of me when I made my report. I apologize. Here's the recipe for the Za'atar I made for the chicken. It's from about.com:

                          http://mideastfood.about.com/od/middl...
                          Ingredients:
                          •1/4 cup sumac
                          •2 tablespoons thyme
                          •1 tablespoon roasted sesame seeds
                          •2 tablespoons marjoram
                          •2 tablespoons oregano
                          •1 teaspoon coarse salt
                          Preparation:
                          Grind the sesame seeds in food processor or with mortar and pestle. Add remaining ingredients and mix well.
                          Store za'atar in a cool, dark place in a plastic....

                          1. re: Gio
                            Caitlin McGrath Sep 2, 2009 06:47 PM

                            That's cool, Gio. I was curious, and a bit confused, at the idea of thyme-less za'atar. I think that's the recipe oakjoan posted in the pantry thread, right? Nice to have a go-to you can make with ground sesame seeds to accomodate your needs - epecially because this recipe is so good!

                            I also like to sprinkle it into cottage cheese and eat with raw veggies like cucumbers and peppers, or brush pita with olive oil, sprinkle with za'atar, and heat/toast in the oven.

                2. re: jen kalb
                  jen kalb Aug 5, 2012 06:32 PM

                  Revisited this recipe tonight - there were a couple of problems reported above which I think I successfully addressed in this effort. First, I had really disliked the bitterness of the lemon slices. this time, I squeezed on the juice of a couple of lemons and grated on some rind - this eliminated the bitter pith from the dish. Second, the dish wound up as a stew the first time (in part because my chicken was too tightly packed in the pan. I spread it out more this time - also, i eliminated the broth/water called for in the recipe. Used a different za'atar mix (Kalustyan Jordanian) It was really flavorful and not too soupy. Really like it with these modifications. Served with sauteed spinach and Itamar's bulghur pilaf from PLENTY (will report on appropriate thread) - which was really good.

                3. re: Rubee
                  beetlebug May 1, 2011 05:32 PM

                  Chicken with Sumac, Za'atar and Lemon, p. 122

                  I made this the other night and it was ok. Part of it was because I used boneless, skinless thighs, not by choice. The butcher gave me the wrong parts. But, I don't think that's not why of my lukewarm reaction to this dish. It was too lemony and the sumac and za'atar flavors didn't come out.

                  I still have half the thighs in the freezer and I'll add more za'atar the next time around.

                  Bad pic bc all I could see, were lemon slices.

                   
                  1. re: Rubee
                    Breadcrumbs May 1, 2011 05:43 PM

                    Roast Chicken w Sumac, Za’atar and Lemon – p. 122

                    This chicken looked like it would be a hit at our house as soon as I read the recipe. Rave reviews in this thread and, the original non-COTM Ottolenghi thread had me convinced we must give it a try. Happy to report the recipe did not disappoint; we loved it.

                    Prep has been well covered by many talented hounds before me so I’ll just speak to what we did a little differently from what I’ve read above.

                    I used a mandoline to slice my onions super-thin, I used a large zip-lock bag to marinate the chicken overnight. The bag allowed me to give everything a good toss and “squish” every now and then to ensure flavours were evenly distributed. The Za’atar I used was purchased pre-mixed at a lovely, local Persian market I discovered during the Arabesque COTM. It was imported from Jordan and smelled delicious in the shop so I thought I’d give it a try. We certainly enjoyed it. There’s much discussion in this thread and the prior Ottolenghi thread about Za’atar and, I also found some great info on-line. It seems the variations of Za’atar are endless. Variations occur depending on countries of origin and of course, chef preferences. Some contain sumac (mine did), others do not. One thing I’d recommend would be to give your Za’atar a taste before sprinkling it on this dish just to get a sense of whether or not it has it’s own bitterness and, of course the strength of the flavours of the herbs, particularly the thyme.

                    One thing we loved about this dish in particular is that you can prep it the night before then just toss it in the oven the following day. Perfect for when company is coming or, a weeknight meal when time is oh so tight! The caramelized onions and lemon, the earthy pop of the pine nuts and the herb and spice infused chicken pieces all came together to make a wonderful, delicious dish.

                    We loved this, I’ll definitely make it again. I served it w some Tzatziki on the side and the Greek-Style Potatoes with Lemon and Thyme from “A New Way To Cook”, a past COTM by Sally Schneider. I can’t take credit for this pairing though, it was a lovely, appetizing photo of those potatoes that Rubee posted that enticed me into making them. Here’s a link to that review if you’re interested:

                    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/5925...

                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                    1. re: Rubee
                      j
                      JaneEYB May 18, 2011 05:45 PM

                      Chicken with sumac, za'atar and lemon p.122

                      I loved the sound of this and the generally favorable reviews above encouraged me but I was actually rather disappointed in this. I probably didn't help but not marinading the chicken for very long - just an hour and a half rather than a few hours to overnight. Everything else I did as per the recipe. My chicken took almost an hour before it was done rather than the suggested 30-40 mins. I just wasn't enthralled by it. I think my za'atar is a bit stale and I'm sure it would be much better with a freshly made mix.

                      I served it with Quinoa salad with dried Iranian lime (which I didn't have) on p.245 of Plenty and Green bean salad with mustard seeds and tarragon on p.196 (loved both of those). I don't know what I was thinking doing 3 dishes on a night when I was really pushed for time - those Ottolenghi recipes seem to just suck me in.

                      1. re: JaneEYB
                        buttertart May 19, 2011 08:19 AM

                        I didn't like that dish very much either, my za'atar was too thyme-y. Not crazy about thyme.

                        1. re: JaneEYB
                          L.Nightshade May 19, 2011 09:48 AM

                          Chicken with Sumac, Za'atar, and Lemon
                          Sorry to report that this dish didn't hit home with us either. I was pretty excited about it, and I very much liked the aroma while cooking. I also liked the idea of roasting the chicken on a tray together with the onions, etc. I did marinate the chicken for over eight hours, but didn't feel that the tastes really merged, or that the chicken picked up a lot of flavor. And as much as I like pine nuts, I felt they were just sitting on top of the chicken without a lot of purpose. I had fresh, fragrant za'atar, so I don't think that is the issue either. Don't get me wrong, we didn't hate it, it was decent, just not great. Mr. Nightshade suggested I try it again and brine the chicken first, but I don't think I give it a second go.

                           
                          1. re: L.Nightshade
                            jen kalb May 29, 2011 04:41 AM

                            my problem with this last year was that the lemon slices added quite a lot of bitterness. Id be inclined to leave it out the next time - maybe add some zest or definitely some lemon juice instead. Also, I felt like I cooked too much chicken at one time - there was too much juice and not enuf caramelization. So Im going to give it one more try.

                            1. re: jen kalb
                              k
                              Karen_Schaffer May 29, 2011 11:57 AM

                              That's very odd about the bitter lemons. I wonder if they were underripe? I realize it's hard to tell with lemons, and when you're buying them from the store, you don't have much choice. But I can tell from my lemon tree that there's a big difference between mature lemons that have hung on the tree for quite a while vs young ones that have just changed from green to yellow but are still immature.

                        2. re: Rubee
                          k
                          Karen_Schaffer May 19, 2011 09:50 PM

                          Chicken with Sumac, Za'atar and Lemon, p. 122

                          My turn with this, at last. And we adored it! The spices, herbs, and lemon gave it such an interesting, complex flavor. Addictive, just as the recipe intro said. And I was impressed that the red onion held some color (due to the lemon, perhaps?).

                          My adaptations: I used skinless (but bone-in) chicken thighs. I cut the recipe in half but probably used more lemon than strictly called for. Water, not chicken stock. I didn't bother with the pinenuts, parsley, or olive oil garnishes. I won't be able to comment on leftovers, because we ate it all, yum yum!

                          I served it with leftover rice & sauce from the facing recipe, roast chicken with saffron, hazelnuts, and honey, so that added an additional complex of flavors. Plus I made the fava (broad bean) and radish salad to accompany, also delish.

                          I will totally make this dish again. This will be a great company dish, since it's prepared ahead and has no last minute fiddling. I'm an Ottolenghi convert (at least for this recipe!).

                          1. re: Karen_Schaffer
                            k
                            Karen_Schaffer May 29, 2011 12:02 PM

                            I will add that my sumac and za'atar were absolutely fresh, bought that day. Neither of them taste bitter, though I think some versions may. And my lemons were very mature, a little on the soft side and very juicy.

                          2. re: Rubee
                            BigSal May 26, 2011 08:13 PM

                            Chicken with Sumac, Za'atar, and Lemon

                            We fall into the "liked it" camp with this one. I happened to have a lonely zucchini in the fridge and threw that in to the mix too(thanks for the idea, Caitlin). I also crisped up the skin by broiling the finished dish for a few minutes. No fuss recipe -easy to throw into the oven after work. The chicken was moist and flavorful. New spices for us, so the dish had new flavors, but not so much so as to turn off the Mr.

                            1. re: Rubee
                              pagesinthesun Jan 7, 2014 11:41 AM

                              This recipe has been well reviewed here already. I made it over the weekend for company. It was successful and delicious. I will make it again.

                              Today, with the leftover chicken, I made a delicious chicken salad. I shredded the chicken, added the onions and pine nuts that clung to the chicken pieces, greek yogurt, scallions, and grainy mustard. It was tangy and delicious. Perfect mixed with baby spinach for lunch.

                            2. greedygirl Aug 4, 2009 03:38 AM

                              Marinated lamb with coriander and honey (p 104)

                              Loved this! It's really easy to make, but you do have to plan ahead as the lamb needs to be marinated overnight.

                              The marinade is a paste of parsley, mint, coriander, garlic, ginger, chillies, salt, lemon juice, soy sauce, sunflower oil, honey, red wine vinegar and water blitzed in a blender or food processer. Slather over the lamb, which should be french trimmed, and separated into two or three cutlet portions.

                              When ready to serve, preheat the oven and shake off the marinade. Sear well on a hot griddle, then transfer to the oven and cook for about fifteen minutes or longer if you want your lamb more cooked. Heat the reserved marinade in a small saucepan and serve with the lamb.

                              I can't describe how good this is. The lamb was pink, incredibly tender and delicious. The sauce is tangy and savoury and sweet all at the same time. My guests raved. We all picked up the bones so we could gnaw every last bit of lamb, apart from one who has the best knife skills I've ever seen!

                              18 Replies
                              1. re: greedygirl
                                The Dairy Queen Aug 6, 2009 08:07 PM

                                I've got this lamb dish in the fridge, marinating for dinner tomorrow!

                                ~TDQ

                                1. re: The Dairy Queen
                                  greedygirl Aug 7, 2009 06:41 AM

                                  I thought it was lick-the-plate gorgeous.

                                  1. re: greedygirl
                                    The Dairy Queen Aug 7, 2009 06:46 AM

                                    HAHAHA! I can't wait! I tasted my marinade last night and it was pretty good. They don't specify what kind of peppers to use (as far as I could tell), so, I used what I had in my CSA. My husband says they are poblanos, but I don't think that's right as poblanos are bigger and milder.... The marinade has a bit of heat to it, still delicious, so, it will be interesting to see how it tastes with the lamb. Also, bizarrely, I ran out of soy sauce, so I topped off with "dark soy sauce" leftover from Dunlop month. For the red wine vinegar, I used some sherry vinegar leftover from Casas month. And I used mint from my garden, called "chocolate mint." I hope these things with their nuanced personalities, mesh well.

                                    What kind of peppers did you use?
                                    ~TDQ

                                    1. re: The Dairy Queen
                                      greedygirl Aug 7, 2009 06:50 AM

                                      The large red ones which I think are cayenne and the ones most commonly found here. They're not massively hot, usually, especially if you take the seeds out.

                                2. re: greedygirl
                                  LulusMom Aug 7, 2009 06:11 AM

                                  And I don't even like lamb and am considering making it!

                                  1. re: greedygirl
                                    The Dairy Queen Aug 9, 2009 02:42 AM

                                    marinated rack of lamb with coriander (aka cilantro) and honey pg 104

                                    This was a huge hit. I'm pretty sure it's my first time cooking rack of lamb, so, I guess this is now my go-to recipe for rack of lamb! My husband immediately went for seconds, though, I'm sure he didn't "need" them. I didn't make any substitutions, per se, but I did have unusual twists on several of the ingredients as I described here http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/6417... I was worried how it would all come together and the answer is: great.

                                    The only real departure from the recipe is that I marinated it two days instead of just overnight. I don't think that caused any problems.

                                    EDIT: oh yeah, I think the recipe called for 15 minutes in the oven; I lobbed off about 5 minutes as I like my lamb more rare. I'm glad I did.

                                    Photo! (sorry, it's not a very good one).

                                    ~TDQ

                                     
                                    1. re: The Dairy Queen
                                      greedygirl Aug 9, 2009 03:29 PM

                                      It really is super good, isn't it?

                                      1. re: greedygirl
                                        The Dairy Queen Aug 9, 2009 03:34 PM

                                        Yes! Craveworthy! Lots of really great recipes in this book. Not hard, either, though you do have to plan ahead for marinating time, etc.

                                        ~TDQ

                                      2. re: The Dairy Queen
                                        c
                                        cpw Aug 10, 2009 08:55 AM

                                        We made the rack of lamb for our picnic yesterday and maybe not a perfect picnic meal, but it was delicious.

                                        I made few substitutions, instead of cilantro-mint-lemon, I used the green chutney I had just made few days ago (I chutney had all the three ingredients, plus a little more). Also I used green serrano chiles (I think the recipe says red chiles). I marinated the lamb overnight and cooked it for lunch the next day.
                                        After searing the chops for 5 minutes, I did not go all the way with 15 minutes in the oven, maybe around 8 minutes, which was medium (I wanted to go for 5 minutes in the oven to get rare, but I got distracted and let it go longer).

                                        Taste wise: These were great, packed with flavor. I had the marinade/sauce on the side, but we did not need to dip them at all.
                                        The only one problem was, the chops were not crispy. But I think that is our mistake, as we packed them in a container right after they were cooked, and I think the condensation made them soggy.

                                        I have a ton of left over marinade, which I had boiled and served as sauce. I think maybe I'll marinated chicken in it and get a similar tasting meal out of it. I am wondering if anybody else has done anything with the leftover marinade?

                                        No picture, but mine were green looking, unlike Dairy Queen's which are prettier red looking!

                                        1. re: cpw
                                          The Dairy Queen Aug 10, 2009 09:39 AM

                                          I'll bet the lamb was messy, but delicious, as part of a picnic!

                                          Tonight will be leftovers night at my house. We only have one serving of lamb left. This will be the true test of love, who lets whom have the last serving of lamb!

                                          I think the marinade would be great over fish, too.

                                          ~TDQ

                                          1. re: The Dairy Queen
                                            c
                                            cpw Aug 10, 2009 12:31 PM

                                            Well, that's the advantage of built in fork in the lamb chops. Moreover after a bottle of reisling, who cares if somebody's watching.

                                            1. re: cpw
                                              d
                                              dkennedy Aug 10, 2009 01:44 PM

                                              I have mine in marinading right now, (without the peppers as I will be serving children as well as adults, hope that doesn't jinx things) and I am planning on grilling them on the BBQ. Do you think the BBQ will work as well as the grill/oven method?

                                              Also, I poured off some of the marinade before adding the lamb so I could make a sauce of it to serve alongside, maybe I'll kick it up a little with a pepper.

                                              1. re: dkennedy
                                                c
                                                cpw Aug 10, 2009 03:09 PM

                                                I am sure bbq will work better. Just keep an eye on the doneness.
                                                What are the sides you are planning to serve with?

                                                1. re: cpw
                                                  d
                                                  dkennedy Aug 12, 2009 06:39 PM

                                                  Hi CPW,

                                                  I made the lamb last night and served it with ribbons of zucchini which I also marinated in the sauce. I put both on the BBQ. Here is my report for both:

                                                  I think making it on the BBQ was a mistake. Even though I dried off the chops before putting them on the grill, it caused a lot of flair ups so the chops really ended up tasting a lot like the grill, instead of the marinade, and I think it really colored the result. Next time I will def. do the oven method. I also think it was a mistake to omit the peppers. It would have really balanced out the flavors. Re the zucchini - they were wonderful alongside the chops.

                                                  1. re: dkennedy
                                                    c
                                                    cpw Aug 12, 2009 07:11 PM

                                                    That was a great idea to marinade the zucchini along with the chops. It gave you an easy and tasty side dish. I'll try it next time, as there is tons of extra marinade.

                                                    I am sorry the bbq method did not work out and also for stearing you in the wrong direction.

                                                    1. re: cpw
                                                      The Dairy Queen Aug 12, 2009 10:42 PM

                                                      Ditto what cpw said: dkennedy, what a great idea to marinate zucchini along with the lamb! I've been wishing that the book had more recipes to use up my CSA zucchini and perhaps this is a way!

                                                      ~-TDQ

                                                      1. re: The Dairy Queen
                                                        Caitlin McGrath Aug 13, 2009 03:24 PM

                                                        Above I noted I did something similar when I made the chicken with za'atar. I tossed chunks of zucchini in with the chicken, onions, and marinade to bake. If I'd thought ahead when I did it, I'd have marinated the zucchini overnight with the rest. Next time.

                                      3. re: greedygirl
                                        BigSal May 10, 2011 07:12 PM

                                        Marinated lamb with coriander and honey (p 104)

                                        We loved this dish too. We made ours on the grill. Great results, easy to make after work, and delicious enough to serve to company.

                                      4. The Dairy Queen Aug 6, 2009 08:02 PM

                                        Roast chicken with saffron, hazelnuts and honey pg 123

                                        So I tried this tonight (which might be my first COTM attempt since, I think, Vietnamese month. Wasn't that last Sept? Wow! What a slacker I've been.)

                                        I bought a chicken at Whole Foods, I was going to have the butcher cut it up into 4 pieces for me (because he will), until I noticed that they had one already cut up and just put that one in my cart instead. Unfortunately, it was actually cut up into 8 pieces. Oh well, I don't think it affected the outcome of the dish much, and actually yielded more reasonable portion sizes.

                                        Basically, you marinate the (skin on) chicken with chopped onions, evoo, ground ginger, cinnamon, saffron, lemon juice, water, S&P, then bake for 35 minutes. While the chicken is in the oven, chop up some hazelnuts, then stir them into honey and rosewater. Spoon the hazelnut concoction over the chicken, then cook another 10 minutes. Garnish with sliced green onions and serve over rice or couscous (I served it over whole wheat orzo because I realized at the last minute I hadn't started any rice.)

                                        I almost had a major catastrophe. I toasted the hazelnuts at 190F. I scoured the recipe to see what temp to turn the oven up to when the chicken went in, when I realized the nuts were supposed to toast at 190C, which is more like 375F. This is the same temp as the chicken. So, I blasted the heat in time to cook the chicken.

                                        In the end, the chicken was very succulent and fragrant with distinct flavors. Very rich. It didn't get super brown or develop a crispy skin. The interior was definitely done--we checked with a thermometer) I wonder if I could achieve a crispy skin by cooking another 15 minutes or so.

                                        Overall, this was a very rich dish. I wish, actually, that I'd taken the chicken skin off...

                                        I liked this dish but did find the richness of it, in combination with the bold saffron/lemon/honey/rosewater, to be a bit overwhelming. However, my husband loved it. He wished the skin were crispier. As I mentioned in the vegetables thread (where I reported on the cuke with poppy seeds salad), I'm a little under the weather tonight, so, maybe that's what's plaguing me. I shall try this again for sure, although, I will probably try without skin.

                                        I also got the marinade going for Marinated lamb with coriander and honey (p 104), which I will have dinner and report on tomorrow.

                                        Photo!

                                        ~TDQ

                                         
                                        36 Replies
                                        1. re: The Dairy Queen
                                          Caitlin McGrath Aug 6, 2009 08:46 PM

                                          Unfortunately, I think crisp skin is a tough one in these recipes (this and the za'atar one discussed above), as they marinate and then cook in the onion/water mixture. I think the chicken would need to be blotted and cooked without the liquidy stuff around it, though it might work to pop it under the broiler at the end. Well, that would probably kill the hazelnuts in this one...

                                          1. re: Caitlin McGrath
                                            oakjoan Aug 6, 2009 11:17 PM

                                            I didn't expect the skin on the za'atar chicken to be crispy and didn't miss it. The lovely sauce created during the roasting was absolutely delicious. It's a great dish to make for a crowd. I made it last year for 14 people. It's also really good with some lavaash.

                                            I also made the turkey marinated in parsley, corriander and mint day before yesterday and wasn't thrilled by it. I did it in the Weber kettle and it looked gorgeous - crispy and brown. The taste, however, wasn't much to write home about. I was disappointed. This is my first disappointing Ottolenghi dish. I'd like to know how others fared with this dish. I even cooked down the marinade to serve as a sauce, but it was just strongly minty and nothing much else. As I said in a previous post, I loaned the book to a friend so I can't put in the page number. If anyone wishes to insert that info, I'd be glad.

                                            1. re: oakjoan
                                              The Dairy Queen Aug 7, 2009 02:13 AM

                                              Oakjoan, is that the "marinated turkey breast with cumin, coriander and white wine" on pg 125? If so, you might want to "report" your post and ask the mods to edit the page number in for you.

                                              Anyway, if that's the dish you mean, I'm sorry to hear it didn't turn out. What a bummer. It sure looks gorgeous in the photo in the book, so one would most certainly have high expectations.

                                              Also, if I recall correctly from a post of yours in Candy's Ottolenghi thread, you were also disappointed in the cucumber with poppy seeds salad. I only bring that up (I'm not trying to nitpick!) because I tried that salad last night and was also underwhelmed. Had that one just slipped your mind, or, have you since figured out a way to turn out that dish with more pleasing results? If the latter, please dish, but, perhaps over in the veggies thread so we don't muss up Caitlin's sleek and efficient thread structure (thank you Caitlin!)?

                                              Cuke with poppy seeds in "vegetables" thread, http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/6417...

                                              ~TDQ

                                              1. re: oakjoan
                                                greedygirl Aug 7, 2009 04:00 AM

                                                That's weird, oj, because I thought you'd made that dish before and liked it. In fact, I was so sure I checked the other thread and here's your report.

                                                "Here's my report on the Marinated Turkey Breast With Cumin, Coriander and White Wine, p. 126. This is quite simple to do. You marinate the turkey breast with mint, parsley, coriander(cilantro) garlic, lemon juice, olive oil, white wine, cumin, salt, and pepper. The book calls for a "small" turkey breast, but mine was very large. I just added a bit more of each ingredient, whizzed them up in the blender, put the turkey breast in a large stainless steel bowl and poured on the marinade. You then massage it into the breast, cover with plastic wrap and leave overnight. It's roasted in a very hot oven for most of the cooking, with heat turned down at the end. Since mine was so big, I used an instant read, inserted thermometer. The turkey got gorgeously browned and the flavoring of the marinade went into the meat due to the long marinating period."

                                                I wonder if the online recipe is slightly different?

                                                1. re: greedygirl
                                                  LulusMom Aug 7, 2009 06:14 AM

                                                  Greedygirl, I thought the exact same thing ... that I'd read a rave from Oakjoan befoer on this dish. And now i'm ultra-concerned because this is also on my list of things to make next week.

                                                  1. re: LulusMom
                                                    oakjoan Aug 10, 2009 11:03 PM

                                                    This is totally weird. I guess I totally forgot about the first turkey breast. I see that I cooked that one in the oven and the one I made last week was on the bbq. Maybe I didn't salt it enough or put enough garlic. It was gorgeously brown and crispy, but it was pretty blah otherwise. Amnesia is such a bummer.

                                                    1. re: oakjoan
                                                      greedygirl Aug 11, 2009 01:08 AM

                                                      It's called age!

                                                      1. re: oakjoan
                                                        LulusMom Aug 11, 2009 08:44 AM

                                                        I do it too. So last night I tried this turkey breast with cumin, coriander and white wine (p. 125). First note to self: do not attempt this recipe again on a 98 degree day. Recipe calls for about a 2 lb breast; not to be found in this area, I went with the smallest I could find - 3.7 lbs. I ended up cooking it maybe 20 minutes more and it was just fine. I doubled the marinade (glad I did). We liked this very much, but after about half a plate full I did have to say that the flavor was getting a little "same-ish" - this isn't always a bad thing, and it wasn't here either, but it did occur to me, and my husband agreed (although also loved it). Lulu went nuts for it, especially the "green stuff" (marinade). I have to say that I have new found respect for greedygirl always having to do these conversions. I find it a pain, but so far worth it. Served this with couscous mixed with roasted vegetables. Nice mix.

                                                        1. re: LulusMom
                                                          greedygirl Aug 11, 2009 09:09 AM

                                                          I don't *do* conversions - I have a scale.

                                                          1. re: greedygirl
                                                            The Dairy Queen Aug 11, 2009 09:16 AM

                                                            Call me crazy, but one surprising thing I've learned from Ottolenghi already that I prefer cooking by weight than using measuring cups, etc. Much more precise and you can use any old container you want!

                                                            ~TDQ

                                                            1. re: greedygirl
                                                              Caitlin McGrath Aug 11, 2009 11:00 AM

                                                              I assumed LulusMom was referring to your need to convert from US volume measures when you use American cookbooks.

                                                              1. re: Caitlin McGrath
                                                                LulusMom Aug 11, 2009 11:27 AM

                                                                exactly. Thanks Caitlin.

                                                                1. re: Caitlin McGrath
                                                                  greedygirl Aug 11, 2009 03:52 PM

                                                                  I have a set of American cups, so it's pretty easy. Plus you have to remember that a lot of recipes are in metric and imperial here. One thing I have which is very useful is a fridge magnet with cup/fl oz/tbsp/ml conversions on it.

                                                                  1. re: greedygirl
                                                                    LulusMom Aug 11, 2009 05:10 PM

                                                                    Still and all, my respect for you being able to keep up is higher than the Andes.

                                                              2. re: LulusMom
                                                                LulusMom Aug 15, 2009 09:23 AM

                                                                Quick aside. We had some of the marinade/sauce leftover. I just fried Lulu an egg for her lunch and figured since she'd liked the sauce so much the first time around, I'd stick it on the plate next to the egg and see if she went for it. In doing so I snuck a bite myself. Fantastic combination. She ate every bit.

                                                              3. re: oakjoan
                                                                oakjoan Aug 11, 2009 11:31 AM

                                                                I realize now that the first time I reported on the turkey breast I had marinated it overnight and cooked it in the oven. This last time I only marinated it for 4-5 hours and cooked in the kettle bbq. The shorter marinating time could have been what made it seem bland to me.

                                                          2. re: oakjoan
                                                            beetlebug May 1, 2011 05:39 PM

                                                            Marinated Turkey Breast with Cumin, Coriander and White Wine (pg. 126)

                                                            I loved this and am really shocked by it. I don't really like turkey and if I do eat turkey, I only eat dark meat. But, turkey breast was on sale, so I figured, why not.

                                                            I immediately thought that the marinade was especially promising (mint, parsley, cilantro, garlic, lemon juice, olive oil, white wine, cumin salt and pepper, all whirled up in a food processor). I upped the amounts of all the non liquid ingredients of the marinade by 2. And, I'm glad I did and would do so again. It smelled so herby and lovely. Anyway, the turkey breast sat in the plastic bag, with the marinade for about 24 hours.

                                                            Then, you roast it without the marinade.

                                                            15 minutes @ 425.

                                                            15 minutes @ 400.

                                                            30-45 minutes @350.

                                                            Let it rest for 10 minutes.

                                                            Simmer the marinade for about 15 minutes.

                                                            This was juicy and flavorful. The pan is a bit of a mess though from the marinade burning on the bottom of the pan. But, it's delicious. I can't wait to try a cold slice tomorrow.

                                                             
                                                             
                                                            1. re: beetlebug
                                                              buttertart May 2, 2011 08:30 AM

                                                              Is that for a half breast? Cooking time seems a bit short if for a whole. Marinade sounds awfully good.

                                                              1. re: buttertart
                                                                beetlebug May 2, 2011 08:35 AM

                                                                It was a very small whole breast. About 2.5 lbs for the whole thing. The book suggests half a breast but I was lucky to find a tiny turkey.

                                                                1. re: beetlebug
                                                                  buttertart May 2, 2011 08:46 AM

                                                                  That IS small, I've never seen one that size.

                                                              2. re: beetlebug
                                                                oakjoan Jun 17, 2011 01:19 PM

                                                                beetlebug: What a difference a year makes! I made the Marinated Turkey Breast last year and wasn't impressed at all. For some reason I decided to give it another try. This time we loved it. It was delicious even though I had no good bread to sop up juices and had to make do with crackers (albeit homemade crackers from a Bittman recipe). I think I may not have marinated it long enough last time I made it because this time the meat was nicely flavored and the sauce delicious.

                                                                1. re: oakjoan
                                                                  beetlebug Jun 17, 2011 01:57 PM

                                                                  So glad you liked it the second time around. I think it would be an excellent summer picnic food, if I had ac in the kitchen. This tastes really good cold as well. I do nuke the sauce a smidge to give it some warmth.

                                                                  @buttertart, it turns out that it wasn't a whole turkey breast. WF had cut down all many of their breasts in half and that's what I bought. I snagged another one while it was on sale and it's sitting in the freezer. I'm going to make this soon, while it's still coolish outside and I can still turn the oven on. The bonus is that my herbs are doing nicely and I just just pick from the containers for my marinade.

                                                                  1. re: beetlebug
                                                                    buttertart Jun 17, 2011 02:16 PM

                                                                    I will make this soon, thanks. Sounds great and we're fond of turkey anyway.

                                                              3. re: oakjoan
                                                                Gio May 23, 2011 06:00 AM

                                                                (Marinated) Turkey (Breast) with Cumin, Coriander and (White Wine), Pg 125

                                                                What Did I make? Grilled whole turkey without white wine. The farm we shop at had small turkeys for sale on Saturday and I couldn't resist. We bought a very meaty 7 1/2 pounder and I immediately thought of grilling it on the Weber then remembered this recipe. I suppose I could have butchered it to use just the breast.. But no, here's what I did: Chopped up mint, parsley, cilantro and stuffed the turkey with that plus a whole head of garlic which I halved; rubbed the turkey with olive oil and lemon juice, then put the lemon halves into the cavity; sprinkled the salt and pepper all over the turkey. After a couple of hours the Weber fire was laid then the turkey, in a roasting pan with a rack, was roasted with indirect heat for little over 2 hours. Steady heat throughout. In fact the temp at one point was 500F so G half closed a vent to lower it.

                                                                Now, I know I didn't make the recipe as written but the turkey was absolutely perfect. Crispy golden brown skin, juicy breast and thigh meat and thoroughly delicious. Mr. Ottolenghi's recipe was the inspiration so that's why I decided to report it here.

                                                              4. re: Caitlin McGrath
                                                                The Dairy Queen Aug 7, 2009 01:59 AM

                                                                I think you're probably right, Caitlin, that crisp skin is hard to achieve when the chicken is cooking right in the marinade. I think we seldom eat skin-on chicken these days and, when we do, we have high expectations for it. Personally, I think the hazelnuts delivered the crunch you'd hope a crispy skin would deliver, so, it wasn't necessary. My husband did miss the crisp skin though.

                                                                I think your point about the only way to achieve a crisp skin in this case is a couple of minutes in the broiler is a good one. Do you think it would work if I cooked the chicken in the liquidy stuff for the 35 minutes, then broiled for a couple minutes, then proceeded to spoon on hazelnuts/honey/rosewater and cook for another 10? Actually, now that I think about it, I don't think that would work. How would I get the oven back down to 375F after I'd been broiling? Oh! I know, broil it in the toaster oven for several minutes, then put it back in the regular oven for 10 minutes at 375F. Does that sound that it might work?

                                                                Personally, I'd rather do it without the skin. I was thinking I could leave the skin on the legs and wings, just to get at least some of the rich fat you're supposed to achieve, but then pull the skin off the breasts and thighs. Do you think it would get too dry, even though it's practically submerged in the liquid during cooking?

                                                                ~TDQ

                                                                1. re: The Dairy Queen
                                                                  jen kalb Aug 7, 2009 07:05 AM

                                                                  If you broil with the oven door open, or open the door of your for a minute., the temp will come down quickly enuf. Setting the oven to broil doesnt necessarily mean that the oven will come up to 500 anyway - you are just looking to have an intense heat source to put the food next to. Thats why you can broil with the oven door open.

                                                                  1. re: jen kalb
                                                                    The Dairy Queen Aug 7, 2009 08:08 AM

                                                                    Ah! Good to know, thank you! I've always wondered about that.

                                                                    ~TDQ

                                                              5. re: The Dairy Queen
                                                                c
                                                                cpw Aug 17, 2009 12:52 PM

                                                                I made this dish in weekend and we love it a lot, a unique combination of flavors which mingle together very well.

                                                                I used bone-in chicken thighs, with no skin (thanks Dairy Queen). I served it with basmati rice and fried green tomatoes.

                                                                1. re: cpw
                                                                  The Dairy Queen Aug 17, 2009 06:23 PM

                                                                  Oh, I'm so glad to hear that you tried and liked it without the skins! Now I know I can try it that way!

                                                                  ~TDQ

                                                                  1. re: cpw
                                                                    greedygirl Aug 18, 2009 01:23 AM

                                                                    I made this dish last night using a whole free-range chicken cut into quarters and we loved it too. The combination of flavours is unusual, but works, with the sweetness of the spices and honey complemented by the lemon and rosewater. As it's quite a rich dish, I served it with simple boiled broccoli, which was perfect.

                                                                    1. re: greedygirl
                                                                      buttertart Aug 18, 2009 10:16 AM

                                                                      This was a big winner chez nous as well. I was afraid that the cinnamon would be overwhelming and the rosewater a bit too perfumey but everything goes together wonderfully. The hazelnuts and honey are great together. (Served it with a shaved fennel, grapefruit, and Kalamata olive salad dressed in sherry vinegar, and a flatbread made from lean bread dough topped with garlic and a shake of za'atar.)

                                                                  2. re: The Dairy Queen
                                                                    Gio May 16, 2011 04:49 AM

                                                                    Roast Chicken with Saffron, Hazelnuts and Honey Pg. 123

                                                                    This is a delightful roast chicken dish and we Loved it. We didn't feel it was "too rich" at all, but thought the flavor was exotic and different. Instead of a cut up chicken I used a combination of boneless thighs without skin and chicken legs with skin.

                                                                    The chicken is marinated in a combination of chopped onions, EVOO, ground ginger, cinnamon, saffron, lemon juice, water, S&P, then baked for 35 minutes in a preheated 375F oven. While the chicken is roasting, toasted hazelnuts are chopped , then stirred into a mixture of honey and rosewater. The hazelnut paste is spooned over the chicken, and cooked 10 minutes longer. Garnish with chopped scallions.

                                                                    1. re: Gio
                                                                      j
                                                                      JaneEYB May 16, 2011 10:38 AM

                                                                      Thanks for the post - this is on my list so I'm glad to see it didn't disappoint.

                                                                    2. re: The Dairy Queen
                                                                      k
                                                                      Karen_Schaffer May 19, 2011 10:07 PM

                                                                      Roast chicken with saffron, hazelnuts and honey pg 123

                                                                      The flavors in this are fabulous: saffron, rosewater, cinnamon, ginger, honey, lemon. I wanted to make it with bone-in skinless thighs, but I ended up with an eight-piece chicken instead. I decided to use the breast meat for this recipe, figuring the more delicate flavors would go together. And it sort of worked, except the breasts (which I skinned but left on the bone) were too big and thick, so they didn't integrate well with the sauce. Next time, I'll either use thighs (skinless bone-in) or maybe I'll cook the marinade ingredients by themselves for a while, then add boneless, skinless breasts to 'poach' in the marinade.

                                                                      Even with the skins off of the chicken, I agree it did seem like a rich dish. I used walnuts instead of hazelnuts because I'm just not a hazelnut fan. We had leftovers which I mixed with rice for the next night's dinner, so that worked out okay.

                                                                      I also used leeks instead of onions because I've got a bunch in the garden that need to be harvested. But it wasn't the best use for them, because they don't 'melt' as nicely under these conditions. Still, the dish overall was great, and I'm sure I'll make it again!

                                                                      1. re: The Dairy Queen
                                                                        L.Nightshade May 30, 2011 02:13 PM

                                                                        Roast Chicken with Saffron, Hazelnuts, and Honey, page 123

                                                                        The procedure for this recipe is well described in posts above, so I will not duplicate that here. I followed the recipe exactly, except for cutting the chicken into six pieces as we found the four-piece cut in the other chicken recipe a bit unwieldy.

                                                                        We loved everything about this dish, the smells while cooking, the textural contrasts, the beguiling flavors. I would warn against this dish for people who don't like floral, perfume-like essences in their foods. The rose water is very prevalent in both smell and taste. I loved it. The taste and heady aroma just transported me to an exotic locale.

                                                                         
                                                                        1. re: L.Nightshade
                                                                          buttertart May 31, 2011 06:57 AM

                                                                          We liked this much more than the lemon one, too. It is exotic in the best possible way.

                                                                      2. s
                                                                        smtucker Aug 9, 2009 06:30 PM

                                                                        Seared duck breasts with blood orange and star anise, page 128

                                                                        I was a bit distracted as I made this tonight. So many people in the kitchen, chatting, interrupting. You would think dinner "just happens!" I used too much orange juice. For some reason, I remembered the juice of 4 oranges instead of 240 ml of orange juice. Oh well. This was still delicious.

                                                                        Rubbed the duck breast with the spice rub of fennel seeds, dried chili flakes, cumin, black pepper and course sea salt and left in the fridge overnight. 30 minutes before dinner time, I began the dish.

                                                                        Seared the duck, removed, drained the fat, and began the sauce. Wine, vinegar and star anise, simmered, before adding the duck back to the pan. Then add the orange slices and chiles. I used two red Holland fresh chiles instead of the dried. None of my dried chiles seems right for this flavor profile.

                                                                        Because I had too much orange juice (organic valencia), the sauce was thinner than I had expected, and sweeter. Thank goodness the oranges were so good.

                                                                        For plating, I started with a bed of crispy chard, topped with sliced duck. On the side, I par-boiled some fingerling potatoes, and then crisped them in some filtered duck fat. Then the gastrique surrounded the entire plate. Separately, I had a carmalized onion and goat cheese tart.

                                                                        Wine for the sauce and drinking was a Chateauneuf de Pape.

                                                                        So, this goes into the "will make again" but with less orange juice so that there is a more tart/sweet thing happening on the plate. Is there a picture? No. Too many people helping in the kitchen, and only getting in the way. I do have a full breast leftover, so maybe I can recreate this for a photo tomorrow. My guests are all rubbing their stomachs. They have no complaints. It is only me, looking for perfection, that has any criticisms at all.

                                                                        22 Replies
                                                                        1. re: smtucker
                                                                          Caitlin McGrath Aug 9, 2009 08:00 PM

                                                                          I wish I had been at your dinner party, smtucker, as your meal sounds tremendous! Duck, crispy chard, duck fat potatoes, caramelized onion and goat cheese tart? I just had dinner, but I want to taste it all right now, along with the Chateauneuf de Pape. I'm very impressed.

                                                                          1. re: smtucker
                                                                            The Dairy Queen Aug 10, 2009 04:31 AM

                                                                            Sounds delicious! Thank you for letting us enjoy your dinner party vicariously!. Your experience is a good example of how, even with a little tinkering, unintentional or otherwise due to necessity or whatever, many of these recipes still work. Sometimes, you have a little too much orange juice and yet, the meal is a success.

                                                                            Delicious though it is, I seldom eat duck and don't think I've ever cooked with it. Do you think this recipe could work with any other kind of meat or poultry?

                                                                            Enjoy your leftovers, regardless of whether you photograph them!

                                                                            ~TDQ

                                                                            1. re: The Dairy Queen
                                                                              s
                                                                              smtucker Aug 10, 2009 08:26 AM

                                                                              TDQ,

                                                                              Duck is one of my favorite "special occasion" meats. The other being rack of lamb. But duck is far cheaper. To cut the cost, I buy a whole duck and break it down. For the cost of two processed breasts, I can get a whole duck. So the freezer is already filled with duck stock, the legs were coated in shallots, salt and thyme for two days and are now in the oven turning into confit, and I have another jar of precious duck fat.

                                                                              But, if you simply don't like duck, then I think beef would enjoy romping about in an orange sauce. After all crispy beef, orange flavor is a wonderful chinese preparation. You will have to replace the fat somehow. Perhaps searing beef in some butter to get the outside crispy. And making the sauce while the beef rests. I don't think I would simmer a nice cut of beef in the sauce. For a lesser cut, I would try cutting strips on the bias, almost stir frying, and then finishing with the already reduced orange sauce.

                                                                              I don't think chicken would have enough oomph, unless you did a scallopine-schnitzel type of prep. To be honest, I so prefer lemon with chicken, I can't really visualize chicken with orange.

                                                                              And finally, I am thinking this could be a good sauce for fish. I pick up my fish share today, and depending on what we get, this just might be dinner! I have lots of sauce left in the fridge.

                                                                              1. re: smtucker
                                                                                The Dairy Queen Aug 10, 2009 09:41 AM

                                                                                Thanks for the ideas--I have a freezer full of beef, so, perhaps I'll try that. Of course, now, I'm so tantalized by your first paragraph about how you do your duck, that I am almost swayed to try the duck, at least once!

                                                                                ~TDQ

                                                                                1. re: smtucker
                                                                                  MMRuth Aug 10, 2009 09:46 AM

                                                                                  I did the exact same thing with a duck this week,

                                                                                  And - I really enjoyed this dish when I made it, but if I recall correctly, I used the Goin method to cook the duck breasts.

                                                                                  1. re: MMRuth
                                                                                    s
                                                                                    smtucker Aug 10, 2009 11:12 AM

                                                                                    MM, I goggled Goin Duck Breast, but all the hits include "going" and "duck breast." Would you be willing to paraphrase the Goin duck method?

                                                                                    1. re: smtucker
                                                                                      MMRuth Aug 10, 2009 11:33 AM

                                                                                      It's meant to be grilled, but she says if you don't have a grill you can use a cast iron skillet. Score the breasts, and rub in a mixture of crushed juniper berries and thyme leaves (I added orange zest this last time) on both sides. Let sit for at least four hours but preferably overnight, in the fridge. Heat up the skillet on medium low, and then put the breasts skin side down, allowing the fat to render and the skin to get crispy - this can take a while. Then turn it over and cook until it is the temp you want. I do one minute for my husband and two for me, let it rest, then slice.

                                                                                       
                                                                                  2. re: smtucker
                                                                                    s
                                                                                    smtucker Aug 10, 2009 11:10 AM

                                                                                    We are headed to San Francisco for a week of pleasure/business, so today is clean out the fridge day. Thank goodness we have a guest with a very healthy appetite staying with us.

                                                                                    Lunch was the leftover duck with orange sauce [strained since the orange segments had fallen apart] with the leftover potatoes [picture attached.] For sides we had the broad bean and radish salad with tahini sauce, eggplant with yogurt sauce and some leftover roasted zucchini. Plus, as though this wasn't enough, a small bit of lovely leftover grilled Costco Prime ribeye steak.

                                                                                    My primary eating companion has decided that the orange sauce, with the additional of extra sherry vinegar added today, goes well on everything. He liked it on the broad beans, he liked it on the beef, he might like it in a cup. I thought it was good on the beef, and didn't want it to touch my eggplant.

                                                                                    The remaining 1/2 cup of sauce has been saved in the freezer for a quick dinner in the future.

                                                                                     
                                                                                    1. re: smtucker
                                                                                      d
                                                                                      dkennedy Aug 10, 2009 01:23 PM

                                                                                      I tried the turkey corn meatballs with red pepper sauce. Here is the site I used to find the recipe: http://ohmy-applepie.blogspot.com/200...

                                                                                      I am not very good at sending links so I am not sure if this will work but if it doesn't, I found it off The Guardian website, if memory serves.

                                                                                      So getting down to what I thought, I loved these! This is high praise because I have tried and discarded about 100 meatball recipes this year, and this one I plan on keeping. The meatballs themselves could have used a little more seasoning, so my advice is to round up on your spices and salt and leave everything else as recommended.

                                                                                      I

                                                                                      1. re: dkennedy
                                                                                        The Dairy Queen Aug 10, 2009 01:42 PM

                                                                                        I'm so intrigued. How labor-intensive were these? Something I could do on a Monday evening?

                                                                                        ~TDQ

                                                                                        1. re: dkennedy
                                                                                          oakjoan Aug 11, 2009 11:43 AM

                                                                                          dkennedy: I love those turkey meatballs, too. Didn't you make the red pepper sauce? I think it makes the dish. I also love the idea (and the taste) of the corn inside the meatballs. Ottolenghi calls for ground ("minced") turkey breast, but I thought that'd be too dry and not as tasty and have made them using ground turkey breast mixed with plain ground turkey (which includes the dark meat).

                                                                                          These are simple and pretty quick to make as well. My husband loves them but I think it's really the roasted pepper sauce that gets him. He's a sucker for roasted peppers. I think he'd buy roasted pepper ice cream!

                                                                                          Note to TDQ: These are not particularly labor intensive, espec. if you buy ground turkey and don't do it yourself. I'd say they were a good weekday dinner.

                                                                                          1. re: oakjoan
                                                                                            The Dairy Queen Aug 11, 2009 11:58 AM

                                                                                            Thank for the tip on those, oakjoan. I shall definitely put these on my "to try" list!

                                                                                            Hmmmm...roasted red pepper ice cream, hey, why not! When you Google on "roasted red bell pepper ice cream", what comes up? Chowhound, of course: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/4767...

                                                                                            ~TDQ

                                                                                            1. re: The Dairy Queen
                                                                                              oakjoan Aug 11, 2009 12:11 PM

                                                                                              rotfl!

                                                                                              Well, gotta run. Making chiles rellenos today. Roasted the skins off yesterday on the bbq. Luckily the weather here is the usual "summer in SF" as in the famous Mark Twain quote/cliche: "The coldest winter I ever spent was one summer in SF." It's 64 degrees.

                                                                                              1. re: oakjoan
                                                                                                s
                                                                                                smtucker Aug 12, 2009 07:11 AM

                                                                                                Just arrived in your fair city and LOVING the weather compared to the scorching heat I left in Boston. Love the idea of roasting the peppers one day, and filling the second. Makes chiles rellenos manageable.

                                                                                              2. re: The Dairy Queen
                                                                                                d
                                                                                                dkennedy Aug 12, 2009 06:32 PM

                                                                                                Hi TDQ,

                                                                                                I agree with Oakjoan, they are a perfect weeknight fare but I did not get around the making the red pepper sauce - I intended to make the meatballs one day and the sauce the next, but the kids are home for the summer so I never got around to step two. Ah, the best laid plans....

                                                                                                I ended up sticking the meatballs in the freezer and I have eaten them several times since as an impromptu snack. When I finally get around to making the sauce I suspect it will be time to make another batch of the meatballs.

                                                                                              3. re: oakjoan
                                                                                                c
                                                                                                cpw Aug 14, 2009 03:21 AM

                                                                                                I am planning to make the turkey meatballs tonight. In the red pepper sauce, it says sweet chili sauce - can somebody please advice what is that.

                                                                                                1. re: cpw
                                                                                                  Gio Aug 14, 2009 03:38 AM

                                                                                                  Sweet Chili Sauce Hot Version:
                                                                                                  http://www.chow.com/recipes/12120

                                                                                                  Sweet Chili Sauce Mild Version:
                                                                                                  http://www.chow.com/recipes/12122

                                                                                                  1. re: Gio
                                                                                                    c
                                                                                                    cpw Aug 14, 2009 03:34 PM

                                                                                                    Thanks Gio!

                                                                                              4. re: dkennedy
                                                                                                c
                                                                                                cpw Aug 15, 2009 08:58 AM

                                                                                                I made the turkey meatballs last night and as oakjoan says, the red pepper sauce makes the dish.

                                                                                                I put together store bought ground turkey, corn (for me 1 corn was 100gms) and the marinade early in the morning before work. I roasted the peppers while I was putting it together. Then I left in the fridge for the day and it was a quick frying in the evening. We liked it lot.

                                                                                                I had doubled the recipe, so I hope leftovers heat well in the microwave.

                                                                                                1. re: cpw
                                                                                                  k
                                                                                                  krista357 Aug 28, 2009 09:26 AM

                                                                                                  yay, my very first cotm recipe and it was fabulous!

                                                                                                  the pepper sauce was rich and wonderful (and full of heat since i always default to spicy chili sauce vs. sweet) i think that this sauce will be used for many future dishes, would be lovely with chicken breasts or grilled sausages.

                                                                                                  i loved the roasting of the peppers instead of the usual charring over an open flame, i think this added more sweet depth to the flavor of the sauce. easy easy easy to make, a perfect weeknight dinner with a salad on the side.

                                                                                        2. re: smtucker
                                                                                          s
                                                                                          smtucker May 27, 2011 05:49 AM

                                                                                          Seared duck breasts with blood orange and star anise, page 128

                                                                                          A manager's special at the local market made this dinner possible. Thank you Mr. Market Basket Manager!

                                                                                          Since I outlined the process back in 2009, I won't do that again. This time, I didn't have quite enough star anise (75%) and I kept track of the orange juice quantity. The dish was spectacular! Lots of flavor, a great balance between the wine, vinegar and orange juice.

                                                                                          Served with French lentils which I finished with the same sherry vinegar, and vinegar dressed raw spinach wilted by the heat of the duck.

                                                                                          Knock out!

                                                                                          1. re: smtucker
                                                                                            c oliver Feb 1, 2014 11:56 AM

                                                                                            I'd like to give this a bump to include a link to the recipe:

                                                                                            http://www.ottolenghi.co.uk/seared-du...

                                                                                            I've never fixed duck breast before and am doing it tomorrow for the two of us (a non-traditional Super Bowl meal, eh?

                                                                                            )

                                                                                            I was looking for something not too sweet and this sounds perfect. Thanks for describing.

                                                                                          2. Gio Aug 12, 2009 06:23 AM

                                                                                            Roast Chicken and Three Rice Salad: Poultry, Pg. 125

                                                                                            Loved, Loved, Loved this! There's so much going on with such a variety of flavors and it all comes together in one fantastic taste sensation. Although this is supposed to be a cold-ish salad we cooked everything at once and had it more or less room temperature. Once again, I halved the recipe, made a suggested substitution of arugula (rocket) for shiso, and used small red bell peppers instead of mild red chiles.

                                                                                            Into a preheated 425F oven goes a well oiled, salted and peppered chicken. It cooks for 10 minutes then the heat is turned down to 375F and continues to roast for 50-60 minutes. In the meantime a cup of basmati rice is cooked, set to rest, covered, then left to cool. Small amounts of brown and wild rice are cooked together then rinsed under cold water to stop the cooking and drained.

                                                                                            When the chicken is cooked, it is carved into chunks placed in a large bowl, A dressing is made by whisking together, in a separate bowl: lemon juice, sesame oil, Thai fish sauce, olive oil and all the cooking juices from the chicken. A thinly sliced onion is fried and then left to cool. Three red chiles and spring onion are thinly sliced and added to the chicken along with the 3 rices and chopped cilantro, mint and shiso leaves. Toss all this gently, taste and correct seasoning, if necessary.

                                                                                            Gadzooks! What a meal this made. Didn't need anything else. Mr. Ottolenghi suggested that left over chicken could be used as well and I think a rotisserie chicken could be also if pressed for time. But I tell you, this roasted chicken was delicious on it's own.

                                                                                            3 Replies
                                                                                            1. re: Gio
                                                                                              greedygirl Aug 12, 2009 07:35 AM

                                                                                              Blimey Gio (or should I say gadzooks - love that word), you really are cooking up storm from this book. There's no stopping you! I've had my eye on that recipe for ages, especially as there'd be lots of leftovers for me to take to work.

                                                                                              1. re: greedygirl
                                                                                                Gio Aug 12, 2009 09:08 AM

                                                                                                Well, GG it just seems that the recipes, although at first glance look very complicated, are not. And, these dishes that I've made so far lend themselves to summer cooking. Yes, here in Boston, it's finally summer. Tomorrow it will be the Chargrilled Broccoli and Asparagus.....

                                                                                                (Tonight I bumping the system and reverting to BAY'A's Tipsy Watermelon Salad, and A New Way To Cook's Sweet Onion and Tomato Gratin....with Ottolenghi's Crumble for a topping!!)

                                                                                              2. re: Gio
                                                                                                BigSal May 2, 2011 07:50 PM

                                                                                                Like Gio, we loved this dish. It is so colorful and flavorful. I was out of basmati so I subbed jasmine rice, used arugula instead of shiso (too early for my garden and it was nowhere to be found locally) and fresno peppers for the mild red chiles (which added a bit of heat. This is definitely a make again dish. I was concerned the Mr. wouldn't enjoy it because of all of the herbs, but he cleaned his plate.

                                                                                              3. Gio Aug 17, 2009 07:38 AM

                                                                                                Roast Chicken with Chili and Basil: On-Line Recipe
                                                                                                http://www.ottolenghi.co.uk/recipes/r...

                                                                                                This was a delicious combination of various oils and spices and we loved it.
                                                                                                Lots of ingredients:
                                                                                                Sunflower oil, sesame oil, Dijon mustard, soy sauce, rice vinegar, dried chilli flakes, chopped spring onions and whole chilies make up the marinade for chicken legs and breasts. The recipe calls for "mild red chilies" but I used 2 jalapeños, seeds and membrane removed and thinly sliced lengthwise. Also a bit of salt and freshly ground black pepper is called for but I just added the pepper.

                                                                                                The chicken marinates for 4 hours or overnight then is roasted in a 400F oven till cooked through...we put the roasting pan into a Weber and roasted over wood chips. Very nice and easy to prepare.... Will definitely make this again and I'll remember to use the basil leaves for garnish instead of totally forgetting them. LOL

                                                                                                We served this with Peaches and Speck with Orange Blossom, Pg. 13, as a side.

                                                                                                6 Replies
                                                                                                1. re: Gio
                                                                                                  c
                                                                                                  cpw Aug 17, 2009 12:17 PM

                                                                                                  I have been eyeing this recipe too, so I am glad you made and liked it. I just have to remember to buy dijon as I am all out from some time.

                                                                                                  1. re: cpw
                                                                                                    Gio Aug 17, 2009 05:24 PM

                                                                                                    Hi cpw... FWIW: I used Maille Dijon as I like it better than Grey Poupon. Not as salty, and more spicy. I think it makes a difference.... but that's just MO.

                                                                                                    1. re: Gio
                                                                                                      c
                                                                                                      cpw Aug 18, 2009 07:45 AM

                                                                                                      Thanks for the tip. I agree with you - Maille Dijon has a much better flavor and since the store across the street does not sell it, I have to make a special trip. Hopefully I'll get to it sooner than later.

                                                                                                      1. re: cpw
                                                                                                        oakjoan Aug 18, 2009 10:59 PM

                                                                                                        I've fallen in love with a mustard from Dijon called, I think, Raymond Faillot. It's much less agressive than Grey Poupon. Don't know how widely available it is.

                                                                                                        Harissa-marinated Chicken withOUT Red Grapefruit Salad, p. 119

                                                                                                        We liked this pretty well. I don't think I put enough hot chilis in it. It was also just marinated for about 7 hours instead of overnight. The harissa marinade has loads of ingredients - red bell, coriander, cumin, caraway, olive oil, chopped red onion, 3 garlic cloves, 2 fresh red chilies, 1 dried red chilli, tomato puree, lemon juice and Greek yoghurt. The onion is fried over low heat and then the whole mixture is processed in the Cuis. The paste is mixed with yoghurt and then smeared all over the chicken. It's then marinated overnight, but as I said, I didn't marinate anywhere near that long. The chicken and the marinade are cooked in a very hot oven (220c. or Gasmark 7).

                                                                                                        I served it with the Butter Bean and Herb Salad and that was a very good combo, but I think the red grapefruit salad would be great. I'll do that next time. The salad has rocket/arugula, grapefruit, s and p and olive oil. The grapefruit juice along with some lemon juice, maple syrup, sald, cinnamon and and 1 star anise are simmered for about 20 minutes and then added to the grapefruit salad. Sounds good.

                                                                                                        1. re: oakjoan
                                                                                                          c
                                                                                                          cpw Aug 19, 2009 10:21 AM

                                                                                                          Thanks for the reco. I am going to try this one out.

                                                                                                  2. re: Gio
                                                                                                    greedygirl Aug 22, 2009 06:25 AM

                                                                                                    We loved this as well. Really easy and very tasty. I used a whole free-range chicken cut into four (I'm getting quite good at jointing chicken now). I forgot the basil as well (too much prosecco and chat with my friend). I served it with a green bean and cherry tomato salad with a parsley dressing from one of my favourite cookbooks which has been neglected recently in favour of Ottolenghi (The Divertimenti Cookbook).

                                                                                                  3. LulusMom Aug 21, 2009 06:24 AM

                                                                                                    Buttered prawns with tomato, olives and arak (pernod) p. 150

                                                                                                    Authors say this serves 4 as a starter, so I bumped up the quantities a bit to serve as a dinner over polenta. Huge hit. First you quickly boil some plum tomatoes, then chill and skin, then cut into 6ths. He wants you to start with the shrimp in the pan first ... sorry, but I just do not like chewy overcooked shrimp. I let the tomatoes, black olives and red chilies have some time to cook in the butter, then added the shrimp. Once the shrimp were just about ready I added the pernod and garlic and more butter. Very tasty. I didnt' have any parsley around so just left it out. This is really easy, and has a nice big bold flavor.

                                                                                                     
                                                                                                    3 Replies
                                                                                                    1. re: LulusMom
                                                                                                      Breadcrumbs May 2, 2011 05:13 PM

                                                                                                      Buttered Prawns with Tomato, Olives and Arak – p. 150

                                                                                                      It’s Election Day here in Canada so I needed something I could pull together in a flash for tonight’s meal. A quick check through this thread landed me here!

                                                                                                      Thanks to LLM’s lovely photo and enticing description of this dish, we were happy to give this a go tonight. This makes for a super-quick and delicious weeknight meal and I’d encourage all shrimp/prawn lovers to give it a try.

                                                                                                      Like LLM, I too was concerned that the shrimp would be over-cooked if they were to hit the pan prior to the other ingredients so, I started out by adding the butter and a tiny splash of olive oil to a hot wok and then stirring in the garlic and chilies. Once the garlic slices were fragrant and almost translucent, I added in the tomatoes and remaining ingredients except the shrimp until the tomatoes were almost at a desired consistency. I pushed those ingredients aside, added the shrimp and, Grace Young style, I let them sear for about 2 mins before starting to stir-fry them. Once they were almost pink, I added the Pernod and, remaining butter then plated after one minute.

                                                                                                      Like LLM I substituted Pernod for the Arak, which wasn’t available. This dish has very few ingredients but it’s the Pernod that shines by tying everything together and truly enhancing all the other components of the dish. If it weren’t so gosh darn unhealthy, I’d be happy to drink a glass full of that lovely tomato-infused slightly spicy Pernod butter sauce!!

                                                                                                      Like LLM, I served this as a main course. We had it over steamed rice and we preceded the meal w a yummy hummus from Donna Hay’s “Too Busy To Cook” cookbook. First time I’ve used DH’s recipe but it sure was a hit and I’ll definitely use it again, so delicious and, appropriately topped w sumac so it was a nice fit w this Middle Eastern inspired Ottolenghi recipe.

                                                                                                       
                                                                                                       
                                                                                                       
                                                                                                      1. re: LulusMom
                                                                                                        Caitlin McGrath Apr 8, 2012 07:46 PM

                                                                                                        Buttered Prawns with Tomato, Olives and Arak, p. 150

                                                                                                        Like the ladies previously reporting, I served this as a main dish for two, rather than a starter for four and also like them, I changed the cooking order so the shrimp wasn't in the pan first, but did it differently than they did. A few ingredient subs: As I find all other out-of-season tomatoes than cherry tomatoes very lacking in flavor, I used halved cherry tomatoes, which I did not peel. In place of arak or Pernod, I used the ouzo in my pantry (essentially the same thing). And I used about half the butter called for, a tablespoon for the sauteing and a tablespoon to finish.

                                                                                                        I started with the tomatoes, and after a few minutes of sauteing, added the shrimp, garlic, and chile flakes; when the shrimp was beginning to turn pink, I added the olives (which I halved) and parsley, then the ouzo and finally the rest of the butter.

                                                                                                        I thought this was outstanding, and it will definitely be repeated. Really great blend of great Mediterranean flavor, with the sweet shrimp and tomatoes, briny olives, garlic, and anise liquor tying it all together. No doubt using less butter made for a less saucy dish, but there were still delicious juices that demanded to be sopped up. Served it with roasted asparagus with fried capers (from 150 Best American Recipes), the timing of which recipe works perfectly with the cooking of this one, BTW, and sourdough bread.

                                                                                                        I debated whether to post my somewhat embarrassing quick cell phone pic (embarrassing because out of focus, but it's the only one I took and I didn't realize until later), but what the heck. For fun, I'll include the first and final courses, baby greens with beets, feta, and walnuts and molten chocolate Grand Marnier cakes.

                                                                                                         
                                                                                                         
                                                                                                         
                                                                                                        1. re: Caitlin McGrath
                                                                                                          buttertart Aug 6, 2012 10:29 AM

                                                                                                          Cell phone or whatever, everything looks super.

                                                                                                      2. Gio Aug 23, 2009 06:22 AM

                                                                                                        {Grilled Mackerel} with Green Olive, Celery, and Raisin Salsa: Fish and Shellfish, Pg. 137.

                                                                                                        The ingredients for this salsa were so intriguing I just had to make it. Thinly sliced celery and green olives (I used Manzanilla olives), capers, raisins, sherry vinegar and flat-leaf parsley are all mixed together to make a complex salsa very different from the usual tomato/chile/garlic/etc. salsa. It paired very well with the pan-fried whiting we made instead of the grilled mackerel of Ottolenghi's recipe and with the Carmelized Endive. I can actually see this as a topping for a pizza, perhaps sans vinegar but with a cheese..... which, though? Thinking cap on.

                                                                                                        3 Replies
                                                                                                        1. re: Gio
                                                                                                          LulusMom Aug 23, 2009 07:06 AM

                                                                                                          Oh I'm so glad some one finally reported on this. I've had this on my short list, but seems that everytime I get to WFs they have just run out of mackerel. Seeing that it worked wll with a sub makes this much easier for me (and truth be told, I'm not sure how mackerel is going to fly with some of the other eaters in this house). Thanks so much for letting us know how it worked out.

                                                                                                          1. re: Gio
                                                                                                            jen kalb Mar 22, 2014 06:20 AM

                                                                                                            I finally made this mackerel last night, using frozen norwegian mackerel filets (packaged in korea!) from costco.

                                                                                                            It was a very simple recipe with only two steps, making the salsa and grilling the fish. Note, in addition to the ingredients mentioned by Gio, the "salsa" included honey, olive oil and salt and pepper to taste - simply chop and mix. I used some green olives from a mediterranean mix - You let the salsa sit for a bit so the flavors meld, the simply spoon if over the fish, grilled with a little olive oil, salt and pepper.

                                                                                                            We thought this dish was a real winner, it looked beautiful, the flavors were clean and fresh and harmonized beautifully - since my husband doesnt care much for celery,his pleasure in the dish was a real triumph. We have enough for a second meal and will definitely make this easy dish again!

                                                                                                            1. re: jen kalb
                                                                                                              q
                                                                                                              qianning Mar 22, 2014 07:41 AM

                                                                                                              We love grilled mackerel, and I'm always looking for new ways to dress it up a bit. But like you I live with someone who's not too keen on celery; reading your report, though, it looks like it might be worth it to try this.

                                                                                                              Have you ever tried the grilled mackerel dishes from"Moro", similar concept, different mix of flavors for the relish/salsa/topping

                                                                                                          2. Rubee Aug 23, 2009 11:59 AM

                                                                                                            Beef and Lamb meatballs Baked in Tahini

                                                                                                            Recipe link:
                                                                                                            http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/6417...

                                                                                                            I had a pound of ground lamb so used that with a little bit of ground beef (instead of a 50:50 ratio). I loved the flavors, especially with the allspice and cinnamon which reminded me a bit of Lebanese 7-spice, and also liked the tangy tahini sauce. I think I made it a bit too thick, so after the first picture below, I added a bit of water to thin it out, stirred to coat the meatballs, and then put it in back in the oven for a few more minutes. They were good as is, served with Ottolenghi's Cauliflower Fritters, but were even better the next day stuffed in pita bread with diced tomatoes and cucumber, and drizzled with the lime-yogurt sauce from the fritters.

                                                                                                             
                                                                                                             
                                                                                                            9 Replies
                                                                                                            1. re: Rubee
                                                                                                              pikawicca Aug 27, 2009 03:51 PM

                                                                                                              Made this for dinner tonight: we loved it, but I made a few changes. I used all lamb and cut the spice to 1/4 tsp. each. (Can't imagine using the full amount called for.) Sprinkled with toasted pine nuts, in addition to lemon zest and parsley. Topped with a dollop of Greek yogurt.

                                                                                                              Note: The flavor of the vinegar really comes through, so use a good one. (I used Forum Chardonnay.)

                                                                                                              1. re: Rubee
                                                                                                                s
                                                                                                                smtucker Sep 2, 2009 01:12 PM

                                                                                                                Question! I just bought some lamb and have 2lbs marinating in spices for Menguez sausage. The rest will be turned into these meatballs. But, he says Allspice (pimento.) What does the pimento mean? Pimento to me means a pepper of some nature, usually red, so I can't quite get my head around what this might mean. Any thoughts appreciated.

                                                                                                                p.s. And do you think I could bake the meatballs and just serve with a garlicy, cucumber-yogurt sauce instead of the tahini?

                                                                                                                1. re: smtucker
                                                                                                                  Caitlin McGrath Sep 2, 2009 01:28 PM

                                                                                                                  The Allspice (pimento) thing is because apparently allspice is or was sometimes called pimento in British usage (I could be wrong, but I think this is because it was called that in some Carribean former colonies where it's native). So it's just regular allspice.

                                                                                                                  1. re: Caitlin McGrath
                                                                                                                    s
                                                                                                                    smtucker Sep 2, 2009 01:39 PM

                                                                                                                    Thank you so much Caitlin. Thought it best to check before grinding my lamb.

                                                                                                                    1. re: smtucker
                                                                                                                      oakjoan Sep 8, 2009 04:28 PM

                                                                                                                      I made the Roast Chicken with Three Rice Salad (p. 124) last night and we both liked it a lot. The 3 rices are white basmati, brown basmati and wild rice. The chicken is rubbed with olive oil, salt and pepper and then roasted first in a very hot oven and then at a lower temp. After it's done, it's pulled apart into chunks and mixed with the cooked rices, along with scallions, onion, chilies, cilantro, mint leaves, and shiso (I only had arugula) and s and p.

                                                                                                                      The dressing is lemon juice, sesame oil, Thai fish sauce and olive oil. Since we'd had Thai food the night before, I just made an oil and vinegar dressing with garlic.

                                                                                                                      A couple of nights ago, I made Beef and Lamb Meatballs Baked in Tahini, p. 109.
                                                                                                                      The tahini is mixed with water, white wine vinegar, garlic and salt. The meatballs are flavored with parslet, garlic, pepper, allspice, cinnamon, s. and p. You first brown them in a skillet and then place them in a baking dish with the tahini for a few minutes. The garnish is lemon zest and parsley.

                                                                                                                      I tasted the tahini mix before baking and was worried it was just too strongly flavored. It almost made my mouth pucker, but after baking it mellowed and the dish was one I'll make again. Very nice. Served with just a big green salad.

                                                                                                                2. re: Rubee
                                                                                                                  Breadcrumbs May 3, 2011 04:24 PM

                                                                                                                  Beef and Lamb Meatballs baked in Tahini – p. 109

                                                                                                                  These just sounded so delicious to us I couldn’t wait to give them a try. After reading the reviews here I was even more anxious to serve them.

                                                                                                                  Thanks to all who have gone before me that did such a great job of providing a link to the recipe and describing the prep so well. All that’s left for me to say at this point is we really enjoyed these and here are the modifications I made:

                                                                                                                  • I used 200g of lamb and 400g beef
                                                                                                                  • I reduced the quantity of allspice to 1.5 tsp and used just ½ tsp of cinnamon out of fear mr bc would turn his nose at “dinner that tastes like dessert” as he sometimes says if he detects cinnamon in a savory dish! That said, there was plenty of seasoning in this dish for our tastes. . . I couldn’t imagine adding more.
                                                                                                                  • I baked the meatballs at 375 vs frying
                                                                                                                  • I only “sauced” the quantity of meatballs we intended to eat at dinner leaving the other “naked” so they could be re-invented in lunch dishes.

                                                                                                                  When I make these again, I’d thin out the sauce with water prior to baking because as you’ll see from the photos, it creates a thin, almost “cheesecake-like” coating on the meatballs and I know we’d prefer a looser, less intense sauce. I also think that the tahini sauce would be fabulous w lemon juice instead of the vinegar for a change.

                                                                                                                  As much as I enjoyed these hot w basmati rice, I’m imagining I’ll love them more at room temp in a pita w lots of fresh veggies and a drizzle of Tzatziki mixed w some water to thin it out a bit.

                                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                  1. re: Breadcrumbs
                                                                                                                    blue room May 3, 2011 07:44 PM

                                                                                                                    I like lamb so much, it would be hard for me to mix it with beef, when I do it I'll use all lamb or beef and pork. That sauce makes me think of peanut sauce--I know it'd be great on meatballs over rice!

                                                                                                                    1. re: Breadcrumbs
                                                                                                                      Breadcrumbs May 4, 2011 09:33 AM

                                                                                                                      . . . and here are those meatballs re-purposed as lunch. . . even more delicious this way IMHO!

                                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                    2. re: Rubee
                                                                                                                      k
                                                                                                                      Karen_Schaffer Nov 28, 2011 10:38 AM

                                                                                                                      Beef and Lamb Meatballs baked in Tahini – p. 109

                                                                                                                      Made these for dinner guests last night, to much acclaim.

                                                                                                                      The tahini sauce thickens up surprisingly just while standing and even more while baking. I used 1 c of water instead of 2/3 and I'll use even more next time. I do wonder why he calls for vinegar instead of lemon juice, which I think I will try next time. I forgot to garnish with lemon zest, which would have been a nice touch. I'll grate some on the leftovers.

                                                                                                                      My big change was that instead of frying the meatballs in batches, I lightly oiled a baking sheet (not sure any oil was actually needed) and baked them in the oven for 20 minutes. So much easier, especially since I was doubling the recipe for a dinner party. I immediately removed the meatballs from the accumulated grease into a baking dish, using a slotted spoon. Then while we were having appetizers, I poured the tahini sauce over them and baked them. Really easy for a dinner party. (I also used all lamb because we really like lamb.)

                                                                                                                      Served with Ottolenghi's Saffron Cauliflower and some roasted squash dressed with a pomegranate molasses vinaigrette (not an Ottolenghi recipe, though it certainly could be!).

                                                                                                                    3. mebby May 3, 2011 09:58 PM

                                                                                                                      (Courgette-Wrapped) Lamb Kebabs, p. 108

                                                                                                                      Not as exotic in flavor as many in the book, but polished off by adult and kids alike. Basically they are free-form kebabs made from ground lamb, feta, toasted pine nuts, parsley and garlic (with a bit of moist bread and egg to bind) and cinnamon and nutmeg (also calls for allspice, but I couldn’t find mine). Brown in oil and then finish in the oven. I skipped the wrapping in courgette as I was in a hurry and not sure it was worth the extra fuss. Served with the slightly spicy tomato sauce called for (chopped tomato, garlic, RPF and olive oil simmered for 25 min).

                                                                                                                      The kids lapped it up and both voted for leftovers in their lunch boxes today. I loved it too and the leftovers in a bed of the tomato sauce made for a delicious lunch for me.

                                                                                                                      These won’t redefine the kebab for you and don’t have the same unusual flavor combos some of Ottolenghi’s recipes do, but the feta and pine nuts definitely stepped it up a notch and the flavor delivered for minimal fuss. Will definitely make again (and I suspect my kids will insist on it).

                                                                                                                      1. Breadcrumbs May 4, 2011 05:15 PM

                                                                                                                        Harissa –Marinated Chicken with Red Grapefruit Salad – p. 119

                                                                                                                        We really like the flavour of Harissa and the unique pairing w a grapefruit salad was all it took to pique my interest in this dish. I didn’t stray too far from the recipe as written except that I decided to grill the chicken instead of baking then broiling it. If you’re interested in making this dish, I’d encourage you to consider giving the grilled version a try, we loved it! Hot, sour, salty, sweet . . . this dish has it all and then some. I’d have bought the book for this recipe alone, scrumptious!

                                                                                                                        Oakjoan made this recipe back in 2009 and I’ve pasted a link to her review here since her post appears under Roast Chicken w Chili and Basil discussion so folks might not be able to find it:

                                                                                                                        http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/6417...

                                                                                                                        We’ve enjoyed various Harissa dishes in the past but I have to admit, I’ve never made my own paste until today and I’d definitely make it again even though I was cursing it a bit at the time!! The flavours of the fresh version were, not surprisingly, much brighter and vibrant without the sharpness you sometimes get from canned or “tubed” versions.

                                                                                                                        In my experience Harissa paste is very smooth and I was concerned I wouldn’t achieve the correct texture in my mini-Cuisinart so I brought out our big-mother-of-a-blender that I’m sure has enough guts to puree a chicken if need be!! Yes, this does seem a bit like over-kill but gosh darn it, my paste was smooth! Actually the thing I hate about the blender (other than I have to drag it out of the dark depths of a skinny, bottom cabinet) is that the blender jar does not have flat sides so I had to dig the paste out of the troughs in the sides and that space in the bottom beneath the blade.

                                                                                                                        Ok, now I’ve got that off my chest, on w the rest of it. Once you’ve pureed your paste ingredients (which includes a pepper you’ve roasted and peeled and a sautéed mix of onions/garlic and chilies.) you mix in a little yogurt and massage this all over your boneless, skinless chicken thighs. To keep things tidy, I tossed the lot in a ziplock. I should also note that I heeded Oakjoan’s comment about the possible lack of heat from the chilies so I decided to forgo using a dry chili and stick w my beloved Thai bird chilies whose heat I can always count on to be consistent. I used 3 for the paste and the heat was perfect for our tastes.

                                                                                                                        Like Oakjoan, I wasn’t able to marinate my chicken overnight so all told, it had about 12 hours of marinating before it hit the grill. Honestly, we felt that was plenty of time as the chicken was quite flavourful.

                                                                                                                        Oakjoan did a great job of describing how the salad and dressing comes together above. The salad dressing or “sauce” as Ottolenghi describes it, calls for 150ml of grapefruit juice, which is supposed to be leftover from the process of supreming 2 grapefruit. Luckily I had more grapefruit in the fridge because I only had 90mls of juice from the 2 grapefruit. All that said, in the end I could have halved the sauce ingredients since the recipe only calls for (and needs) just 1 tbsp of sauce per plate and the recipe yielded almost double that after the reduction process.

                                                                                                                         
                                                                                                                         
                                                                                                                         
                                                                                                                        4 Replies
                                                                                                                        1. re: Breadcrumbs
                                                                                                                          mebby May 4, 2011 06:08 PM

                                                                                                                          Wow, BC, that is pretty spectacular-looking! I've had my eye on this recipe and I'm so glad to hear that it works well grilled, as it seems from past reviews that a number of them don't translate as well (and I love that you are breaking out the grill at just over 40 F -- bringing summer on one great grilled meal at a time!). And those pictures are so gorgeous I had to do the rare click-through to see them in all their full-size glory.

                                                                                                                          1. re: Breadcrumbs
                                                                                                                            buttertart May 5, 2011 07:21 AM

                                                                                                                            I have GOT to make that recipe, sounds fabulous, and the combination with grapefruit is so enticing. Your "purée a chicken" cracked me up, gosh darn it!

                                                                                                                            1. re: buttertart
                                                                                                                              Breadcrumbs May 5, 2011 05:28 PM

                                                                                                                              Mebby and buttertart, thank-you so much! I actually took all my own photos yesterday including my meatball pita lunch shot up-thread because mr bc was having some trouble w his wrist so I'm glad they turned out ok.

                                                                                                                              I hope you both get a chance to give this recipe a try, it's really something different and special.

                                                                                                                              1. re: Breadcrumbs
                                                                                                                                buttertart May 6, 2011 07:26 AM

                                                                                                                                The recipe title alone makes my mouth water.

                                                                                                                          2. L.Nightshade May 5, 2011 02:07 PM

                                                                                                                            Turkey and Sweetcorn Meatballs with Roasted Pepper Sauce, page 125.

                                                                                                                            I apologize if this post is in the wrong place. I know there are some posts about this dish upstream, but they are indented/replies to a duck breast post, so I didn't know which entry was the proper one to reply to.

                                                                                                                            As dkennedy mentions above, the recipes for the meatballs and the sauce are online here:
                                                                                                                            http://ohmy-applepie.blogspot.com/2008/07/ottolenghi.html
                                                                                                                            and look pretty much verbatim from the book, with the omission of 1 1/2 tsp salt in the meatballs. I don't know if they need the full 1 1/2 tsp, but I think they do need the salt.

                                                                                                                            I followed both recipes pretty closely, except that I tend to round up slightly with spices, and I used a smaller amount of oil in a non-stick pan. Also, my red peppers were a little more bitter than usual, so after tasting the finished sauce, I added a touch more sweet chili sauce and that seemed to brighten it right up.

                                                                                                                            Although I was a little doubtful about browning the turkey balls in the pan and cooking in the oven for only five minutes, they were perfectly done.

                                                                                                                            We liked this dish quite a lot. I especially liked the turkey-corn-cumin flavor combination. The red pepper sauce adds a nice contrast, in both taste and appearance. I served it with Marinated Aubergine with Tahini and Oregano, reviewed here:
                                                                                                                            http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/641711#6517645
                                                                                                                            and Roasted Butternut Squash with Burnt Aubergine and Pomegranate Molasses, reviewed here:
                                                                                                                            http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/6417...
                                                                                                                            so there were three dishes and three sauces, which made eating rather fun. I tried the different sauces with the different dishes, but YO knows what he is doing, and has them paired for maximum flavor impact, they didn't work as well when switched.

                                                                                                                            I'd make these to just keep on hand for lunches or tapas.

                                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                            13 Replies
                                                                                                                            1. re: L.Nightshade
                                                                                                                              s
                                                                                                                              smtucker May 5, 2011 04:08 PM

                                                                                                                              So beautiful. I love that Aubergine with Tahini and Oregano dish and make it quite regularly. Next time, I will have meatballs at the same time.

                                                                                                                              1. re: L.Nightshade
                                                                                                                                Breadcrumbs May 5, 2011 06:51 PM

                                                                                                                                Yay! I'm so happy to hear you liked these LN, looks like they're on the menu for next week! They really do look lovely, thanks for the great review!

                                                                                                                                1. re: L.Nightshade
                                                                                                                                  Breadcrumbs May 9, 2011 05:01 PM

                                                                                                                                  Turkey and Sweetcorn Meatballs with Roasted Pepper Sauce – p. 125

                                                                                                                                  My turn with these today thanks to the enticing reviews provided by L. Nightshade and dkennedy.

                                                                                                                                  Let me just say, we LOVED these; they were outstanding. The wonderful roasted red pepper sauce was a perfect match for the sweet, toasted corn studded meatballs.

                                                                                                                                  Prep for this recipe consists of making the meatballs and, the red pepper sauce.

                                                                                                                                  Sauce: Peppers are roasted, peeling is optional, YO notes it’s not necessary however I did peel them then they are added to a blender along w their roasting juices, olive oil, salt, cilantro (I skipped this due to an allergy), garlic (I doubled this!), sweet chili sauce, a chopped mild chili (I couldn’t resist the urge to kick things up and used one Thai bird chili instead) and cider or white vinegar (I used cider vinegar). Ingredients are processed until smooth and seasoning is adjusted to taste. I used my Bamix stick blender and it worked like a dream to puree this delicious-tasting sauce.

                                                                                                                                  Meatballs: This recipe calls for 3 slices of stale white bread so I set those out in the morning so they’d have time to dry out by end of day. YO also has you blacken your corn kernels in a non stick pan for 2-3 mins then allow to cool. I did this in the morning as well to make after work prep that much quicker. Bread is soaked in water then squeezed to extract the water and crumbled into a bowl to which you add corn, turkey, egg, green onions (chopped), parsley, ground cumin (I reduced to 1 tsp as mr bc can find it overpowering . . . YO calls for 2.5tsp.), crushed garlic, salt and pepper. Once mixed, meatballs are shaped w wet hands. My mixture was quite moist however the meatballs did hold their shape.

                                                                                                                                  As LN notes above YO has you brown the meatballs on the stove then finish in the oven. I simply baked them in the oven @ 375 for 25 mins.

                                                                                                                                  We served this over steamed rice with some roasted asparagus on the side. As I mentioned we thought this dish was just wonderful. Honestly, it wouldn’t have mattered to us what was served alongside, these were the star of our show tonight! I’ll serve these again for dinner, as hors d’oeuvres or well, just any old time!! We could eat these here or there, we could eat these anywhere!! What more can I say?!!

                                                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                  1. re: Breadcrumbs
                                                                                                                                    L.Nightshade May 9, 2011 05:09 PM

                                                                                                                                    I'm so glad you liked these, they were quite a hit here also.
                                                                                                                                    Your meatballs look so nicely browned, that happened in the oven alone? I'd like to try them without the preliminary fry if it works that well!

                                                                                                                                    1. re: L.Nightshade
                                                                                                                                      Breadcrumbs May 9, 2011 05:15 PM

                                                                                                                                      Thanks so much LN, we really just adored these. As for the browning, certainly the bottoms were browned more than the sides but there was adequate caramelization on each one that I wouldn't hesitate to prepare them this way again. As you can see, I put them on parchment. 25 mins @ 375 and they came out just as you see them above.

                                                                                                                                      1. re: Breadcrumbs
                                                                                                                                        L.Nightshade May 9, 2011 05:17 PM

                                                                                                                                        Thanks, I'll make a note in the book and try them your way next time!

                                                                                                                                        1. re: Breadcrumbs
                                                                                                                                          r
                                                                                                                                          Rella May 9, 2011 06:45 PM

                                                                                                                                          Just a note,looking at your meatballs, I made some just a day ago, which are my second time making meatballs in the oven. The first batch was made with beef only (with the usual other ingredients). The second batch were made with beef and sweet sausage. Mine were probably much larger than what yours look like in the picture, but I baked them also on parchment at 475F. They didn't burn.

                                                                                                                                          1. re: Rella
                                                                                                                                            Breadcrumbs May 9, 2011 06:52 PM

                                                                                                                                            Hi Rella,

                                                                                                                                            These meatballs were about the size of a golf ball. Good to know that even a higher temp does't burn. I've been baking all my meatballs for a few years now and, like you, I've been quite pleased w the results. Also it's much simpler w less mess this way!

                                                                                                                                            1. re: Breadcrumbs
                                                                                                                                              L.Nightshade May 9, 2011 06:58 PM

                                                                                                                                              Breadcrumbs and Rella-
                                                                                                                                              I have never baked meatballs, so excuse me if this is a dumb question. Why do you bake them on parchment paper? I've usually used parchment more for pastry-type baking, or papillote. Is it just for the clean-up, or does it affect the cooking? How would it differ from baking on aluminum foil?

                                                                                                                                              1. re: L.Nightshade
                                                                                                                                                Breadcrumbs May 9, 2011 07:03 PM

                                                                                                                                                I use parchment because it provides a non-stick surface without the use of any oils or cooking sprays. In my experience foil requires an oil or spray and even then, i've found it still adheres to some food surfaces, especially during caramelization.

                                                                                                                                                1. re: Breadcrumbs
                                                                                                                                                  r
                                                                                                                                                  Rella May 9, 2011 07:44 PM

                                                                                                                                                  I use parchment for the same reason. Even so, on a lot of things that I bake on a baking sheet, I will lay down a sheet of aluminum foil first, then the parchment paper. This I do usually in hopes that I can pick up the two together, crumble them up together, or even build little edges so that I can pick up the two together, as you know that parchment paper is crackley and the grease can get away from you and create a mess.

                                                                                                                                                  I use this method to roast vegetables, as well. Probably other things that don't come to mind right now.

                                                                                                                                                  1. re: Rella
                                                                                                                                                    L.Nightshade May 9, 2011 07:56 PM

                                                                                                                                                    Thank you both. I'm always learning something new on these boards!

                                                                                                                                      2. re: Breadcrumbs
                                                                                                                                        j
                                                                                                                                        JaneEYB May 15, 2011 07:02 PM

                                                                                                                                        Turkey and sweetcorn meatballs with roasted pepper sauce p. 125

                                                                                                                                        Not much to add since Breadcrumbs and L.Nightshade provide such comprehensive reviews above. Just to say that I loved this - the combination of the strong, spicy roasted pepper sauce with the mild meatballs was lovely. Next time I think I'll just go the oven route like BC as I found the meatballs rather soft and they also stuck quite a bit in the pan while I was browning them. The meatballs in the photo in the book look so evenly browned - I can never get my meatballs that even.

                                                                                                                                        Definitely a keeper.

                                                                                                                                    2. L.Nightshade May 15, 2011 02:17 PM

                                                                                                                                      Seared Tuna with Pistachio Crust and (Papaya) Salsa, page 140

                                                                                                                                      The recipe calls for papaya, but none were to be had. I added a little pineapple that I had left over. The salsa takes longer than the tuna, just the time spent chopping mango, cucumber, red chiles, ginger, and red onion. The chopped ingredients are tossed with fish sauce, olive oil, lemon juice, and caster sugar.

                                                                                                                                      I bought ahi tuna steaks for this, instead of the specified loin cut into cylinders. The tuna is very easy. It is first seared in a pan, then brushed with dijon mustard and coated with ground pistachios mixed with a little lemon zest. It is finished in the oven.

                                                                                                                                      Well, just lovely. The salsa is so good I could eat it with a spoon. It would be great in fish tacos too. I loved the pistachio, mustard, and tuna combination. We like to err to the rare on our tuna, and I had a little trouble with the timing. It's hard to tell when a fish is done when it's crusted with nuts. But it came out fine.

                                                                                                                                      A very enjoyable dish, it's going into my rotating list for sure.

                                                                                                                                      I served this with kale rabe, prepared like the broccoli rabe oshitashi from ENYT.

                                                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                      1. j
                                                                                                                                        JaneEYB May 15, 2011 07:11 PM

                                                                                                                                        Marinated turkey breast with cumin, coriander and white wine p.126

                                                                                                                                        For once I got myself organized in advance and marinated the turkey breast for the full 24 hours. The marinade was mint, parsley, cilantro, garlic, cumin, lemon juice, white wine and olive oil. My marinade was much greener than in the book photo - that looks like the herbs are still quite chunky rather than pureed into a smooth sauce. Anyway, mine was delicious. very moist, great flavor and the marinade heated up as a sauce was really good.

                                                                                                                                        I served it with Chargrilled cauliflower with tomato, dill and capers p.51

                                                                                                                                        1. L.Nightshade May 29, 2011 04:06 PM

                                                                                                                                          Grilled Beef plus Two Sauces
                                                                                                                                          From the recipe for Roasted Beef Fillet Plus Three Sauces, page 110.

                                                                                                                                          I made two of the three sauces to accompany grilled beef filet. The sauce with watercress and mustard seemed a bit too similar to the sauce with rocket and horseradish, so I made only the latter.

                                                                                                                                          The green sauce is a simple puree of rocket, horseradish (I used jarred, still can't find fresh), garlic, olive oil, milk, salt, and pepper. Once pureed, greek yogurt is added and stirred in. What could be easier?

                                                                                                                                          Choka, the red sauce is made from cooked tomatoes (burnt in the skillet per directions, I charred in the oven instead), sauteed onion, mild red chile (I also roasted the chile), garlic, cilantro, paprika, oil, chile flakes, salt and pepper. I got the directions on the two sauces mixed up, and put this one in the processor also. I stopped when I realized what I had done, but it probably should have been quite a bit chunkier.

                                                                                                                                          I can't speak to the technique on the beef, as Mr. Nightshade handled that end of things, and did a stellar job of it.

                                                                                                                                          We liked both of these sauces quite a bit. The choka does have a smoky taste which is perfect for grilled beef. The green sauce is a refreshing contrast. Together, they make a colorful plate.

                                                                                                                                           
                                                                                                                                          1 Reply
                                                                                                                                          1. re: L.Nightshade
                                                                                                                                            L.Nightshade Sep 23, 2011 10:13 PM

                                                                                                                                            Since reporting on this recipe I've made both the green sauce and the choka for different purposes. Both are great sauces with many uses. Today I used the choka with Dorie Greenspan's chard pancakes. Delicious!

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