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Pairing for Crab Cakes and High Acidity Pasta

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I am making crab cakes this evening (nothing flashy, a typical recipe). I wanted to pair it with a pasta rather than a salad or vegetable. I am making a lemon spaghetti with lemon zest, basil, some pecorino romano. I would normally go for a high acidity wine for just the crab cakes, but does the tangy nature of the pasta change the equation? Any ideas on what would be a good wine for the dish?

Thanks!

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  1. For my palate, the wine pairing wouldn't change since I love zippy acidity in food and wine.

    That said I'd go with an albarino, maybe some slight fizz from a vino verhde or txakoli, a vermentino (especially from Sardinia) or a sancerre.

    1. Nope, I don't think your pasta changes the pairing. My recommendation would still be the same: Savennieres. Here's an earlier post of mine on that pairing:

      "I had the Baumard Savennieres with crab cakes, and it was a revelation: the toasted brioche/hops/slight caramel matched perfectly with the browned crust of the crab cakes; the minerality and herbs -- tarragon, chives -- lined up as well, as did the citrus (tangerine and lime). A lovely white with seafood. Finally, the acid was a good foil against the fried (but not greasy) crab cakes. Savennieres is now one of my go-to wines to pair with seafood that is breaded or prepared with a nut crust. A good buy, as well."

      1 Reply
      1. re: maria lorraine

        Yes, a Chenin Blanc should go well too. In their youth, especially, the acid is forward, and should work well too.

        Hunt

      2. I'm with Vinosnob, and would add a flinty Chabils with good acid, as an alternative.

        The Sancere is probably my go-to, for such a combo, and the rest should work well.

        Hunt

        1. If the crab cakes have chili why not try Riesling cuts thru and clean the palate! Pasta - yes different ball game I think. If you keep the pasta go for Chabils as I agree with Bill.

          1. I'm with the Sancerre faction.

            The meal sounds wonderful -- if your wine store has one of the light-hearted rose or white Provencal wines, this would be a lovely accompaniment to your meal. Coteau d'Aix en Provence or similar.

            1. stepping out from the still wines, I suggest you consider trying a sparkline wine, preferably a blanc de blanc. there's nothing wrong with having it from start to finish...