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Pan Fried Noodle Search

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Hello foodies. I'm on the hunt for a very specific kind of pan-fried noodle that I can't find anywhere in NYC.

The Chinese restaurant that I grew up with outside of Boston, Golden Star (since closed), made these incredible plain, white, stretchy pan-fried noodles. They were flat and thin, exactly like rice noodles, but not clear or translucent. These were very stretchy, flat, thin, very white noodles that were flash boiled and simply sautéed in a pan. They served them all sauced-up in Lo Mein, but also as a menu item simply called “Pan-Fried Noodles.” They were non-greasy and very toothsome and satisfying.

All of the pan-fried noodles that I have ordered here have been round egg noodles or clearish, flat rice noodles. Has anyone seen anything like the ones I’m looking for?

Thanks!

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  1. I haven't seen those but they do sound yummy. I know I'll be ostrasized by the elite Chinese food snobs on this board, but my favorite place for pan fried noodles is Wo Hop 17 Mott Street (downstairs). It's called chow mein, Cantonese style." ("Chow Mein, how gauche!")

    1 Reply
    1. re: Stuartmc910

      I have to agree that Wo Hop 17 Mott in Manhattan is one of the best chinese rests in the city....we go average 3-4 times a month. Getting off-track.... pan fried noodles is totally different than lo mein and/or chow mein (chinese vegetables with chicken or shrimp etc..in a white sauce with little pieces of chopmeat over chinese noodles you would put in soup with some white rice.....so yummy ...My mom in FLA goes there for their chicken chow mein when she's in town:).......Pan Fried is as it says.....lo mein is cooked with some sort of brown sauce and soft never crunchy (never made it so can't say what the ingredients are) . Wish I did have recipe for pan fried as my hubby is going to try his luck for our meal tonight..... If anyone knows exactly how to make please let me know......

      -----
      Wo Hop
      17 Mott St, New York, NY 10013

    2. The white rice noodles are "ho fun" in Cantonese, "he fen" in Mandarin. Most any decent Cantonese place has them. Typically "pan fried" noodles though denotes the crispy version of egg or wheat noodles where they are flash boiled and then made crispy. Steer clear of Wo Hop which serves American-Chinese food. Maybe that is what you are looking for? Head to NY Noodletown or Yummy Noodle on Bowery, Yogee Restaurant on Chrystie, East Corner Wonton or even Big Wong on Mott.

      1 Reply
      1. re: scoopG

        He Fen is usually not thin noddles, but that does sound like the same preparation. OP's rendition sounds like he fen made with thin noodles is all.

      2. i seem to recall good ones@ chow chao, but it's been many years since i had them there

        2 Replies
        1. re: thew

          Perhaps you mean New Chao Chow? At 111 Mott Street?

          1. re: scoopG

            i guess so. i've eaten there so long, i don't really think about the name - just the place

        2. Joe's Shanghai has a version of "pan-fried noodles" that are not the usual yellow super thin type of noodles (that you would find in a standard wonton noodle soup say at Big Wong). It is also not the flat, wide rice noodles either ("ho fun" that you would find in a beef chow-fun).

          Joe's Shanghai's is a white noodle, kind of thick, not too thin, and deep fried, served with a meat/veggie combo sauce over the top which then makes the noodles tender enough to eat. These are yummy (the noodle, I mean, I don't remember the sauce).

          Although if you're looking for not-deep-fried but stir-fried white, flat, thin, narrow, rice noodles, you may be looking for Kway Tiao (what I consider the Chinese version of Pad Thai), at least that's how I've seen it in restaurants in Chinatown. If so, then I think Bo Ky has it, too. Although in Malaysia or Singapore, Kway Tiao can be narrow or wide.

          1 Reply
          1. re: sohjyu

            Hi everyone- Thanks to all who have replied! These all sound like yummy options, but I don't think we're hitting the mark. The noodles I'm looking for are white, very stretchy, linguine-flat and thin. They aren't rice noodles and they aren't as wide as fettuccini. The restaurant I've ordered them at all my life was a polynesian chinese restaurant. Maybe I need to look for some of those in NYC? Anyone have any other leads for these noodles? Eternally grateful...

          2. Hi everyone- Thanks to all who have replied! These all sound like yummy options, but I don't think we're hitting the mark. The noodles I'm looking for are white, very stretchy, linguine-flat and thin. They aren't rice noodles and they aren't as wide as fettuccini. The restaurant I've ordered them at all my life was a polynesian chinese restaurant. Maybe I need to look for some of those in NYC? Anyone have any other leads for these noodles? Eternally grateful...

            2 Replies
            1. re: limonadam

              I can think of two other possibilities. First of all, the character of chow fun/rice noodles has changed over the years. They used to be white and non-translucent, made solely out of rice flour and water. Probably 20 years ago the Vietnamese introduced a variation that included added starch, making them a little translucent and much chewier. Eventually, this new rice noodle completely supplanted the old chow fun noodle, which I kind of think doesn't exist anymore. Alternatively, there are flat, dry Chinese noodles that are fairly white in color, and which are still sold in Chinese stores. They're very popular for home cooking, but I don't think I've ever seen these type served in a Chinese restaurant. There are many varieties of Chinese noodles in the stores that you normally won't find in Chinese restaurants. Perhaps you can go through a Chinese store and see if your noodle is there.

              1. re: Chandavkl

                Add another possibility--fresh Chinese flour noodles used to make the thick chow mein from decades ago. Still available in the refrigerator case of some Chinese markets.

            2. Great ideas! I'll take a look and see. Thanks!

              1. i don't exactly know where to find the good ones in a restaurant (i stir fried them myself at home!). but i suppose you're talking about "mai fun", or "mai sin" which actually is the real rice noodles. the transparent stuff is actually made from beans / yam, and shouldn't be called rice noodles (although many people confuse them). if it helps at all, in chinese the thing you're looking for is 米紛(mai fun) or 米線 (mai sin). the former is thinner, can be fried to be crispy. the later is chewier, more often use in soup or sauce. both are made from rice.