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Poutine near Montreal University?

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I arrived in Montreal from my native California over a week ago for a conference and have been staying in the dorms at Montreal University. I suspect that most of the other attendees have been primarily eating at the many restaurants on Cote-des-Neiges, but by digging through the goldmine of information posted by you hounds I've managed to eat and drink at some truly outstanding places (Schwartz's, Olive & Gourmando, Fairmount Bagel Bakery, Ripples, Dieu Du Ciel ). I've also had the good fortune to ignorantly wander into some really good restaurants (Boutan, Greasy Spoon), and though I have experienced one or two small misses, my trip has been a delicious and extremely gastronomically satisfying one.

But now I need your help! I'm leaving Friday and I still haven't managed to get my hands on poutine. Another post claimed the crown jewel of the city was La Banquise, but that's pretty far away and I was looking for something a little closer. Are there any restaurants serving up delicious poutine near the university? I'm willing to go far if need be, but closer would certainly be better.

Also, one more question. Though I've achieved most of my Montreal food goals, there's still one more (besides poutine) that I've failed in: I haven't made it to Jean-Talon. I've frequented the large farmer's market that takes place each week in San Francisco near the ferry building, and the main thing keeping me from making the trip to Jean-Talon is the nagging question of whether this market is sufficiently better or different to merit the journey. I suspect I know the answer, but what are your thoughts?

Thank you so much for all the helpful information already on this board, and thanks in advance for your answers to my questions!

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  1. «I've frequented the large farmer's market that takes place each week in San Francisco near the ferry building, and the main thing keeping me from making the trip to Jean-Talon is the nagging question of whether this market is sufficiently better or different to merit the journey.»

    A few years ago on that other board, a SFBA resident addressed this very question: "I have to say that I was mightily impressed with Jean-Talon Market on my brief visit. It's what San Francisco's Ferry Plaza Farmer's Market can only dream of being when it grows up ... Worth at least half a day of shopping by foodies on even the busiest travel schedule, even if you can't get it all through customs."

    I'd add that you should try hitting it on the weekend to experience it in its full, press-of-fleshy splendor. As for getting there, just hop on the blue line (the Édouard-Montpetit or Université de Montréal stations are a short walk from the residences) and head east to de Castelnau or Jean-Talon stations. About ten minutes, once you're on the train. For La Banquise, the 51 East bus, which runs along Édouard-Montpetit will get you within a few blocks in about 15 minutes. If there are any standout poutineries in Côte-des-Neiges, I'm unaware of them.

    1. The only decent poutine i can think of around there is in the frite alors on lacombe. I like the fries at frite alor but it doesn't compare to the poutine heavyweights like la banquise or ma'am bolduc.

      The website lists an address of 3617 Lacombe for it.

      1. I've lived in SF and the Ferry building is good but you should definitely check out JTM if you are into that sort of thing.

        1. I realize few people will care about this post given that it's coming over 1500 days (!) after the original, but I always find it satisfying when the OP closes out a thread, and better late than never? I ended up making it to Jean-Talon, which was a lot of fun and most impressive. As for poutine, I didn't have enough time to make it to La Banquise during my stay, so I actually stopped off en route to YUL. Lugged my 50-pound suitcase up and down the metro stops, dragged it for several blocks along the street and staggered into the restaurant, sweaty and in a mad rush. Four years later, and I can say that I'm very glad I did -- I haven't had poutine since, but I eagerly await the day I return to Montreal to try it (and the many other foods I had there) again.

          1 Reply
          1. re: adk

            That's hilarious - thanks for the follow-up! Hope your next visit to La Banquise is luggageless.