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bone-in skin-on chicken thighs -- ideas for tasty, cozy, affordable please

Hi hounds! So chicken thighs (bone-in, skin-on) are on sale this week and I'm going to grab a few extra packages. I need some new ideas please! I have some fantastic recipes that I usually use for thighs --mostly Cookbook of the Month recipes like Greek chicken smothered in onions and feta, Chicken Marbella, Mario's cacciatore, a tagine from epicurious (link below). But I'm looking for some new UTTERLY DELICIOUS ideas. Slow-cooked would be great -- I don't mind longer prep time but I'm not into fussy recipes with a kazillion steps unless the payoff is really worth it.

I know it's July, but it's cool and rainy, so comfort food or summery dishes would be great :)

I might like to try Chicken Dijonnaise (Silver Palate).

I'd also be into marinating the thighs in some of the sauce that I'm putting together for sesame noodles tonight. I thought I could just make extra and marinate then bake -- but I'm not sure on cooking time -- 35ish minutes at 350 sound good?

Oh, and here's the tagine I really like. I made it Christmas Eve and my mom went crazy for this one... gave some to my roommate and he raves about it all the time --

Moroccan chicken with eggplant, tomatoes, and almonds:
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

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  1. It's a fairly well known but often overlooked way to prepare chicken and I love to use it with chicken thighs.

    8 chicken thighs (+/-)
    1 can of beer (the cheap stuff works just fine)
    1/2 cup soy sauce
    1/4 cup pineapple juice

    Drop the chicken into a large pot, pour in the liquid ingredients, bring to a boil (stirring occassionally) over medium/low heat and allow to continue, uncovered, at a soft boil (stirring more often as time passes and liquid evaporates to coat each piece with the liquids and to prevent burning/sticking) until a thin syrup develops in the bottom of the pan.. Plate (I like to put it on a bed of rice) and drizzle some of the syrup over top.
    What makes this recipe so appealing for me is that I can share it with anyone, even inexperienced home cooks, without concern for their getting the amount of ingredients perfectly correct. This recipe allows for a wide range of variables (I sometimes add a bit of fresh chopped ginger to the mix) because the amount of each ingredient is not critical and anyone can "play" with it to adjust for their individual taste.

    17 Replies
    1. re: todao

      I don't have any specific recipes to provide, but how about either:

      Chicken Savoy (Balsamic Vinegar Sauce) ....or

      Chicken Murphy (potatoes, onions and peppers) Sausage optional.

      1. re: fourunder

        Oooo fourunder, you reminded me of Giada's Balsamic Roasted Chicken another FAVORITE of mine and so easy. Here's how I do it:

        I really adore the simplicity of preparation and the gorgeous flavors of this chicken. The leftovers are *amazing* in salads or sandwiches.

        The night before -- marinate a cut up chicken (about 4 pounds. Here you can do breasts, thighs, legs, whatever -- but you want skin-on meat on the bone) in the following:

        1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
        one juicy lemon-- squeeze in all of the juice
        1/4 cup good mustard. I have used Dijon, whole grain... whatever you like
        a few minced cloves of garlic
        1 tsp salt and 1 tsp pepper
        1/2 cup olive oil

        Swirl the chicken around in the marinade so all of the pieces are coated. Cover and pop in the fridge. you can marinate in a giant ziploc, or (as I do) in the same pan -- a glass baking dish 9 x 13 or whatever you are going to use to roast. If you don't have a whole 24 hours, at least let it soak for 3 or 4 hours. But I like this best when marinated overnight.

        The next day, cook at 400 for about 45 minutes, uncovered. You can reduce the cooking liquid on the stovetop if you like, just a little. It makes a luscious sauce. I put it in a pretty bowl/boat for spooning on extra.

        This is one really simple delicious preparation of chicken for anyone new to cooking, new to cooking meat, or looking for a yummy spin on roasted chicken.
        ..................... ........................... ............................
        Then I looked up Chicken Savoy per your suggestion, fourunder -- similar. Cook about 3 lbs cut up bone-in skin-on chicken pieces in a glass baking dish at 450 for 45 to 60 minutes, with a cup of stock, a few cloves crushed garlic, 1 tsp oregano, a few Tbsp olive oil, and 1/4 cup grated Romano cheese (YUM!) Drizzle a few Tbsp balsamic over at any point during the cooking. Turn the chicken and Baste with more oil, vinegar, broth partway through the cooking. I'm going to try it for sure. I am excited about the cheese!

        1. re: foxy fairy

          I love chicken w/ balsamic vinegar. The recipe I have is from Bon Appetit (1991) and is similiar to yours, however it has 1/2 cup chopped onion, 1/4 lb. sliced mushrooms and 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil.

          1. re: lynnlato

            I would really like to add mushrooms. Do you just throw the sliced onions and mushrooms right into the pan with the chicken pieces and roast all together?

            Oh wait, now I see a recipe from Dec 1991 Bon Appetit, but no mushrooms.

            http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

            Is this the one you use? Maybe you adapted it for thighs. This one is for boneless skinless breasts, and it's all done stovetop. I am always looking for ideas for boneless skinless breasts, so I will try this one too. Reminds me a teensy bit of the raspberry chicken from Silver Palate -- lots of flavor from raspberry vinegar, a nice tang, and I do that one with the boneless skinless breasts.

            1. re: foxy fairy

              Yep, that's the one I do - but I use chicken thighs.

              I want to try yours, though also. I am always roasting chicken (high heat like you). I need some variations from my usual methods.

              Another favorite of mine is I take marinate chicken pieces in some fresh lemon juice (for 15 mins. - not too long or it'll get mushy). I take the zest of a couple of lemons and mash it w/ Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper in a mortar & pestle. I then spread this on the chicken pieces in the marinade. Pop it in the oven and roast for about 45 mins. at 425-450. Home made lemon pepper chicken - is SO goood. :)

              1. re: lynnlato

                Oh wow. That sounds divine. Lemon and pepper are on the top of my faves list. Thank you for that idea! Can't wait to try it.

                So do you use boneless skinless thighs for the Bon App recipe? I think that sounds great with thighs... more flavorful than breasts. I am kind of getting sick of boneless skinless breasts, honestly, although I do cook them for health-conscious friends. I'm not usually like WOW I can't stop eating this when it's a boneless skinless breast dish... whereas when I cook with skin-on meat on the bone it just adds so much YUMMINESS, of course.

                1. re: foxy fairy

                  Yes, I use both bone-in & boneless - whatever I have on hand. I very rarely buy boneless skinless chicken breasts anymore. It's like chewing on styrofoam peanuts anymore ('course I have started buying strictly organic chicken now and that a little bit better... but still).

                  Do try the lemon zest, salt & pepper - I promise you, you will love it. My daughter gets giddy when I tell her that is what we are having for dinner. And it's practically effortless - gotta love that.

                  1. re: lynnlato

                    That is a great simple recipe. I often marinade mine for the zest and s/p works very well too. Great flavor and crispy skin. Nice recipe that is so simple.

                2. re: lynnlato

                  lynnlato,

                  Can you tell em what the ratio of lemon zest to both the pepper and salt is??? and how many chix thights will it accomodate??

                  Thanks

                  1. re: nyfoodjoe

                    I usually just eyeball it. I typically roast 4-5 chicken thighs and used two lemons (zest 'em first). I've never measured. But just think about how mush Kosher salt you would use to season the skins and use that amount, along with the zest from the two lemons and a generous amount of fresh pepper. Sorry I don't have more exact measurements.

                    1. re: lynnlato

                      lynnlato --

                      YUM! I made the lemon pepper chicken tonight, on a rainy thunderstormy evening in Rhode Island. Wow. I will make this again and again. I roasted two thighs (perfect for dinner for one) and followed your guidelines -- zest and juice of one lemon for the two thighs, and lots of salt and pepper. I actually was craving a chicken sandwich so I toasted up some bread, slathered on mayo, and piled on the chicken which was SO FABULOUS, juicy with the crispy lemony skin.

                      Yay! check out the picture! Thank you so much, lynnlato. No wonder your daughter gets so enthusiastic about this recipe!

                       
                      1. re: foxy fairy

                        Yay! Glad it was a success. AND it looks delicious. This is exactly why Chowhound ROCKS. :)

                  2. re: lynnlato

                    That sounds like a way-easier version of the "Perfect Roast Chicken" that someone posted on here a while ago. It involved preserving your own lemons. Too much work. Can't wait to try yours.

                    1. re: lynnlato

                      oh my yumalicious, I must try

                      why are so many so against chicken thighs? they are wonderful and tasty and juicy, so why all the complaints about them when I find chicken breasts often times boring

                      1. re: iL Divo

                        You are not alone. Most of the word prefers dark meat chicken. The preference for breast meat is an American phenomenon. I find it far less tasty and frequently dry.

                        Oops. I just saw that I had posted something very similar back in July of '09 when this thread first was out. Sorry to repeat myself.

            2. re: todao

              I love chicken thighs. I never got it about what it is that Americans love about chicken breasts. They're relatively tasteless, easy to dry out. Give me a chicken thigh any time.

              So I tried your recipe, todao -- or a variation of anyway. I took your basic recipe, including the ginger, but also adding garlic and allepo peppers. I added a bit of canola oil and marinated the thighs for several hours. Then I baked it in the marinade for about an hour at 350, reduced the liquid to less than half and spooned it over the thighs.

              I was expecting something kind of teriaki-like, but the result was surprisingly salty. If I were to do it again, I would cut the soy sauce, probably by half and maybe add a little brown sugar to ensure that the sweetness balanced the saltiness.

              1. re: todao

                This.Looks.Fantabulous. I'm going to follow your instructions when I make it the first time (over the weekend, definitely.) And I'm already playing w/ variations, as you said; minced fresh ginger, maybe bell pepper strips.....wow. DEEEEE-licious sounding. Thanks for sharing it, but I know you're a sharing kinda guy.

              2. I can't tell you how many times I've made this. Easy and delicious. Braised Chicken Thighs with Olives and Basil: http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/br...

                1. Brown thighs on both sides in olive oil/butter
                  Remove from pan
                  Saute rice in drippings
                  Add a couple cloves sliced garlic
                  Add double amount of chicken broth (as rice used) i.e. 1 cup rice, 2 cups broth
                  Add 1 small can (8 oz) tomato sauce
                  Stir thoroughly and bring to boil
                  Return chicken to pan, cover and lower heat
                  simmer for 20 minutes

                  1. I bone them out and use them in many ways. Boneless ones sometimes go into a Thai coconut curry dish. The sauce is all creamy and the chicken melt in your mouth tender.

                    1. I use thighs for the roast chicken with sumac, za'atar and lemon, from Ottolenghi: The Cookbook. Dead simple, and best if you can marinate for 24 hours.

                      http://thecookbookgeek.blogspot.com/2...

                      I also like thighs for this Braised Chicken in Aromatic Tomato Sauce, from a Bon Appetit special issue on the Greek Islands, which I adore.

                      http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

                      And really homey for wet weather is this Chicken Braised with Lemon and Garlic, which cooks in the oven. It calls for whole legs, but thighs would be fine. I like to serve it in shallow soup plates with Marcella Hazan's smothered cabbage, Venetian style, from Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking.

                      http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/ch...

                      2 Replies
                      1. re: Caitlin McGrath

                        wow Caitlin, that Ottolenghi recipe looks amazing!

                        Foxy Fairy, if you want something similar but less involved, just toss the thighs with a bit of olive oil and then some za'atar (I try to cover them completely) and then roast in a hot oven (425) for about 50 minutes. The house will smell amazing, and you can roast some veggies in another pan on the side. Done and delicious! I make this weekly once the weather cools down enough to have the oven hot like that for that long.

                        1. re: Budino

                          The beauty of the Ottolenghi recipe is, it's not much work - slice an onion and a lemon, chop a little garlic, and throw everything together to marinate (I just put it in a ziplock bag in the fridge). Then just roast the next day. Lots of flavor.