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Jerusalem: Cafeet restaurant: sweet potato salad

At the restaurant called Cafeet in Jerusalem, on Emek Refaim, they serve an amazing and unique sweet potato salad. I'm looking for as much of a recipe/list of ingredients as possible. Thanks for any help!

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  1. According to the menu, the ingredients for the Sweet Potato Oreganato are: mixture of baby greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, mushrooms, onion, Bulgarian cheese and sweet potato strips stir-fried in soy sauce with a mixture of crunchy walnuts on top.

    I also found an old review that lists the ingredients of the regular (not longer on the menu?) oreganato as: tomatoes, Bulgarian cheese, black olives, onion, stir-fried zucchini, pine nuts, pistachio, walnuts, sunflower seeds, basil, mint, olive oil, and oregano.

    22 Replies
    1. re: JudgeMaven

      Does Cafeet have any other locations aside from the one on Emek?

      1. re: cresyd

        The website lists the one in the Moshava, and I know of no other.

        1. re: JudgeMaven

          I was in Malcha mall today and a branch of Caffit is opening there. I also read a Jerusalem website that said there is a branch of Caffit in the Hebrew U botanical gardens.

          1. re: JudgeMaven

            The gardens near Ramat Gan? That's the one I must have been thinking of. Thanks.

                1. re: lukshen

                  Jerusalem, just outside Jaffa Gate.

                  1. re: cresyd

                    thank you, here's a question. If I'll only be in Jerusalem for a day and I'm definitely going to the Machana Yeduda, should I have lunch there or drive to Caffit? I'll be driving down from Rehovot.

                    1. re: lukshen

                      Personally, I don't love Caffit. I think it's a very nice example of an Israeli mid-range restaurant that has good salads and pasta, but tends to be a little on the sterile side. If you're in the Machenea Yehuda, I'd recommend staying there for lunch. Azure in the Iraqi section is my personal favorite place to eat there and has a great mix of Ashkenazi and Sephardic dishes. The restaurants in and around the market have very fresh ingredients and usually provide a more exciting ambiance.

                      However, if I was doing this trip on a Friday - I might eat lunch elsewhere. I find the shuk a bit of a painful zoo on Fridays.

                      1. re: cresyd

                        Hmmm, it's amazing the play certain restaurants get, for better or worse. If you think the market and Azure may be too crowded, especially because it will be the Friday before Yom Kippur, I would entertain any suggestions you may have. My cousin is the opposite of me, not a foodie and is only going to Jerusalem because I asked to go.

                        1. re: lukshen

                          As a tourist, the shuk, even on a Friday, is probably worth braving. However if you're going the Friday before Yom Kippur, I'd take extra time to talk to either people where you're staying or your hotel to get some recommendations for the specific issues related to how Shabbat and Yom Kippur will impact everything.

                          1. re: lukshen

                            The market will be crowded on the Friday before Yom Kippur (after all, people will still be cooking for Shabbat). That said, people don't go to the shuk on Fridays to eat in the restaurants there.
                            The clocks are changed the Sabbath before Yom Kippur, so places will be closing earlier (around 2:00 PM) that day. If kashrut isn't an issue for you, and you and your cousins want to escape the shuk, I suggest Rivaleh on Emek Refaim in the German Colony. It is a perfectly decent bistro, open 24/7, and is probably the cheapest restaurant on the entire street.

                            1. re: JudgeMaven

                              Thank you for the heads up on the time change. We will probably stay in the shuk. We will have to be back in Rehovot for a Shabbat dinner ourselves. I just have to see Jerusalem at least once while I'm in Israel.

                        2. re: lukshen

                          I'd stay with Machane Yehuda and I'll second Azure. Great, great little place. The Mamilla Mall was just barely opening last time I was in Jerusalem so I don't know of anything there. Unless the Malcha Mall has changed quite a bit the food there is no more appealing than the food court in any American mall, which is to say give it a miss.

                          1. re: rockycat

                            I'm with you Rocky! I hope that we will be able to find Azure after we buy ruggelach @ Marzipan to take home. The only good court that I know of is in Emeryville, CA outside of San Francisco. No chain restaurants, they say it is the first food in the US. Great Thai coffee and Korean food.
                            Thank you for your reply.

                            1. re: lukshen

                              Just be careful if you buy too much dried fruit in the shuk. We discovered, to our dismay, that dried fruit looks quite a bit like plastique explosives on the airport luggage x-rays. Fortunately, the security personnel were used to dumb Americans making the mistake of packing dired pomegranate and berries.

                              1. re: rockycat

                                Another fun security item is if you take any of the Dead Sea mud products (has to be the straight mud). The mud has sulfur in it which sets off all sorts of sensors. Not the end of the world, but still a pain.

                                1. re: cresyd

                                  you two are very funny, thanks for the tips

                              2. re: lukshen

                                Though I am in the minority on this issue, I found the ruggelach at Marzipan to be a big disappointment.

                          2. re: cresyd

                            That's the Mamilla Mall (outside of Jaffa Gate). Malcha Mall is in the neighborhood of Malcha near the zoo.

                            I would suggest eating in Machaneh Yehuda and not stopping at Caffit (any of its branches). The food is good, but the food options at the shuk are much more unique and authentic.

                            1. re: JudgeMaven

                              JudgeMaven you seem to be a real jerusalem food guru! Please help? Here for 3 nights only, really want to experience authentic but great food. Give me 3-4 suggestions for my culinary itinerary. We are staying in a private apartment walking distance to Mamilla Mall. Fingers crossed you can help.

                              Midgee