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"The End of the Line": Documentary About Ocean Seafood Depletion

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I read a review of this film, which just opened in LA and NY, in the NY Times:

http://movies.nytimes.com/2009/06/19/...

The film's website has more info, trailer, etc.: http://endoftheline.com/film

Anyone seen it?

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  1. Thanks for pointing this documentary out -- wasn't aware of it before now. It is definitely a subject that needed calling attention to, as not enough people are aware of the dire state of the world's fisheries. After Bittman's article a few weeks ago, and now this, maybe more people will become clued into this important issue.

    4 Replies
    1. re: DanaB

      I'm saying this with all seriousness - not being flip or trying to be funny - it does sound like we need to eat more jelly fish if jelly fish overpopulation if going to be a problem. (Which is great, since i love jelly fish.)

      1. re: limster

        You have mentioned jellyfish before. How do you prepare them? Where do you get them? And what is the "loveable" aspect?

        1. re: Veggo

          It's a common cold appetizer in a number of Chinese cuisines, should be able to get them at say Cantonese or Shanghainese places. Typically poached (or even dried, and then rehydrated) and cut into long noodle-like strands but of course variations exist. Texture is an important indication of quality - must have a blunt snappy crunch (which I love), nothing soft or watery. A Shanghainese place that I used to frequent would contrast jellyfish with pickled turnip in a light scallion and sesame oil dressing.

          You might find this useful: http://search.chow.com/search?query=j...

          1. re: limster

            In my experience, jellyfish is an ingredient that is more about texture than flavor - most of the flavor derives from what it's dressed in, and that snappy crunch is what distinguishes it and makes it good to eat. A very different texture than one might expect from the name jellyfish or from seeing them move in the water.

    2. Same here, Caitlin--now I'll be waiting for both, "Food, Inc." and this one. Thanks for the heads-up!