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GREAT Tomatoes!

Anyone else had them? I've been picking up tomatoes with the stems on from Walmart. They have no stickers about where they are grown. But what flavor! The absolute best tomatoes I've had in more years than I can remember. I'm in danger of becoming an addict!

Is anyone else finding great tomatoes this year? My current favorite way to fix them is simply dice them, put them in a bowl, douse well with evoo, salt, pepper, a bit of oregano, a drizzle of balsamic, and toss in a few garlic croutons. Really good!

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  1. sadly...no.
    it seems once I left the great Garden State, my love affair with good tomatoes was OVA.

    Publix wants me to choose between buying their 'Ugly Ripe' (which my girl friend swears are the best tomatoes ever) or paying my mortgage, so I've been trying to keep out of that aisle (and out of foreclosure!)

    i always try to get the ones on the vine when they are on sale- as long as they smell tomatoey.. otherwise i get the campanelli (or whatever that name is) and they are passable. they are in the plastic clamshell boxes and they are small and cute.

    2 Replies
    1. re: Boccone Dolce

      I love ugly tomatoes. They are, indeed, the best tomatoes ever, but yes, pricey. I am glad eventually my own will be growing on the porch (not "uglies" per se, but a variety of different heirlooms, grape, Roma) so we won't have to shell out for the funky ones. We usually buy grape tomatoes because they at least consistently taste good.

      The plastic clamshell boxed tomatoes are Campari. They're tasty, but ugly wins the beauty contest for me. HA HA!

      1. re: Boccone Dolce

        P.S. THIS tomato is right up your alley given your comment re the price of Ugly Ripes: MORTGAGE LIFTER! :)
        http://www.cookinglight.com/food/in-s...

      2. Thanks for the tip; I'll try them. I find with marginal tomatoes, I chop them, drizzle with evoo, s&p and let set a while. Seems to help

          1. re: jaykayen

            I LOVE yellow tomatoes, but I can't remember ever seeing them in stores. <sigh> They really are the most "tomatoey" tasting tomatoes I can think of.

            1. re: Caroline1

              C1, I don't think I've seen yellow ones in stores either, but we are growing them. Can't wait to have my first taste. Do you grow them (or did you previously)? Are these the ones you mean? They are sooooooooo adorable!
              http://www.cookinglight.com/food/in-s...

              1. re: kattyeyes

                Those are different. The ones I've had are "globe" tomaoes, maybe three to four inches in diameter. I've also had yellow cherry tomatoes, which are good but not quite as rich as the larger ones I've had. It's been a few years since I've had them (okay, who knows how long "a few years" can be at my age!), and I've been looking for seeds off and on. Undoubtedly "heirloom" by now. I hope they haven't been lost! Here's hoping yours are flavorsome and make your mouth dance!

                1. re: Caroline1

                  my mother grew and purchased yellow tomatoes (globe, cherry) in Chicago & it's suburbs while I was growing up; our neighbor from across the street would leave bags of the tomatoes and other produce throughout the summer, including over the past 5-10 years.

                  They had a flavour that almost reminded me of marmelade.

                  1. re: Caralien

                    A sandwich with a herbed boursin or any good cheese, arugula, a couple of red onion slices and these little tomatoes on a good stone ground wheat bread is amazing flavor. As you said, almost like marmalade Caralien. So sweet.

                2. re: kattyeyes

                  well I did recently get some yellow FL tomatoes from the farmers market- those were pretty good (I forgot about them!) I think I made tomato sandwiches until they were gone. they were the size of reg tomatoes, not those flippin adorable tiny ones.

                  1. re: Boccone Dolce

                    The baby pears my favorite. My one plant I must have harvested 100. It makes an amazing sauce with fresh spinach and angle hair pasta, shallots, garlic and fresh asparagus. Topped with pecorino and nothing better.

                  2. re: kattyeyes

                    Those look just like mine, they are amazing tasting.

              2. Some of the best I've had where I currently live (the SF Bay Area) are dry farmed. Apparently they can only be grown this way in very specific microclimates (hereabouts, it's the area inland of Half Moon Bay). The growers only water them when they first set the plants, then the plants draw water from the soil through their roots. The tomatoes have great concentrated tomato flavor. It'll be another month or so before they show up at the farmers' market, I'd guess.

                1. I bought some tomatoes this past weekend at Wal Mart (shaped like those Roma tomatoes), no labels, and they were fresh and delicious. Definitely not the hot house taste. I diced them up, put some diced green onions with them and ate them with black beans and wild rice.

                  1 Reply
                  1. well camera bat is dead, sorry, just took yellow pear pics in baggie but no power.

                    1 Reply
                    1. re: kchurchill5

                      No worries, here is a whole slideshow of heirloom tomatoes from Cooking Light with recipes for each one:
                      http://www.cookinglight.com/food/in-s...

                    2. We've split off a subthread about growing tomatoes to the Gardening board. You can find it here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/626539

                      1. The best hothouse tomatoes for me, on a vine, in a clamshell, has been Campari, from the Lake Erie north shore greenhouses. They are about 2 inches across, and full of summer flavor.
                        I'm afraid to try any others, except in mid summer, because they never measure up.

                        1 Reply
                        1. re: jayt90

                          We happened on an heirloom tomato festival in Prince Edward County a few years ago. There are good reasons (other than just agribusiness requirements) why some of these varieties became "heirlooms". A few of them, mostly purple or green ones with weird shapes, were awesome but most of those on display - there were many - were really uninteresting if not actually bad.

                          I loved the Campari tomatoes when they first appeared, but they have become less reliably special over time. The Campari heirloom varieties aren't worth buying.