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wine in aluminum pop-top cans? why not?

wine in aluminum pop-top cans? why not?
why isn't this a good idea?

once the wine is aged, then "bottled," wouldn't the can:
1. not allow the (inevitable?) air to affect the flavor of the wine any further (does the wine "breathe" *any* through the cork -- even if it is covered with heavy foil?)
2. not let the wine spoil from getting "corked"
3. not allow light to affect the wine
4. be easier and cheaper to store and ship?

also...as a corollary, aren't screw caps better than bottles with corks for similar reasons?

or would the whole "show" of uncorking, and/or decanting and the whole wine "experience" be destroyed by using screwtops or cans, thus making these modern storage techniques emotionally unacceptable as smart alternatives to the ancient methods?

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  1. "or would the whole "show" of uncorking, and/or decanting and the whole wine "experience" be destroyed by using screwtops or cans, thus making these modern storage techniques emotionally unacceptable as smart alternatives to the ancient methods?"

    I think that's part of it. Also, you don't want a metallic taste in your wine.

    1. Wine in cans has been around for years. Very useful when traveling or camping etc.

      1 - issue of whether ox-trans is necessary for aging of wines is contentious but since 99% of all wines is drunk within aday of purchase, and since no-one has released an age worthy wine in cans it doesn't matter.
      2 - true
      3- true
      4 - true. And eaierto open.

      Screwcaps vs corks -- a most contentious issue that no doubt has been discussed to death on this site

      3 Replies
      1. re: Gussie Finknottle

        I would love to be the a server for a night opening 750ml cans of wine at a table just to see the look on the people's faces. It makes me laugh just to think of it.

        On another note, it's the wine inside that counts, right? Heck, there's a restaurant in Atlanta that serves their wines btg from kegs.

        1. re: orlwine

          >>> Heck, there's a restaurant in Atlanta that serves their wines btg from kegs. <<<

          That's been going on for over 30 years.

      2. «1. not allow the (inevitable?) air to affect the flavor of the wine any further (does the wine "breathe" *any* through the cork -- even if it is covered with heavy foil?)»

        Trans-cork air exchange is so minimal as to be insignificant compared with the air introduced during bottling, especially for wines meant for quick consumption, which, as Gussie points out, all canned wines are (don't expect to see Château Latour or Dominus in cans).

        «2. not let the wine spoil from getting "corked"»
        TCA and related compounds that "cork" wines can be introduced at the winery before the bottle is stoppered, so while cans reduce the incidence of tainted wines, they don't eliminate it.

        «3. not allow light to affect the wine»
        True. Cans won't protect wines from heat damage, however.

        «4. be easier and cheaper to store and ship?»
        Yep. Cans are also virtually unbreakable.

        Do a Google image search on wine cans for pics galore. For example: http://www.plastech.biz/images/news/2...

        1. Wouldn't it negatively affect the taste though? Beer in cans always tastes much worse to me than beer in bottles. Is it all in my head?

          How big would a wine can be anyway? 750ml would be a very large can.

          1 Reply
          1. re: oolah

            It could be in your head. The cans are lined so that no metallic taste can be imparted. Actually, some of the best and most progresive micro breweries have bgun packaging their beer in cans. They are really the ideal container for beer, and should work just as well for wine. I think people would just have to get over the image of a canned wine being a cheap or inferior product; it doesn't have to be. It definitely would be convenient in some circumstances.

          2. Of course it's a good idea. But it's hard enough to convince high-end beer drinkers to drink microbrews in cans, so good luck with that one.

            1 Reply
            1. re: madgreek

              madgreek, it is really more about the appearances and ritual, don't you think?

              plus, beer in cans is "associated" with brews like anheuser-busch's budweiser.

              there are beer snobs, wine snobs..... food snobs, too. i think much of it is about "i'm "in" and you're not!".

            2. If I'm not 'mis-remembering' they used to sell wine in cans at Narita airport in Japan. Not sure if or how an age requirement was dealt with, but I'm pretty sure I remember that....... along with those darned benches with virtually no back to them.

              Of course, there was also Coppola's sparkling wine (Sophia?) in cans. May still be around.

              1 Reply
              1. re: Midlife

                i just saw "sophia" in trader joe's. 4 smaller-than-beer-cans of sparkling wine in a cardboard box, around $15 iirc.