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favorite pot roast

c
cleopatra999 May 9, 2009 09:21 AM

what is your favorite way to cook pot roast? I like to sear it and use a whole bottle of wine, but I am looking for variations. Let me know!

  1. goldy12 May 11, 2009 04:56 PM

    I'm a minimalist and just like to put the roast in the crockpot with salt & pepper, top with onions and set on low for 6-8 hours. Simple, but delicious. I start it in the morning and then when I get home from work the house smells of beefy goodness. Yes I realize I'm taking a risk by leaving an appliance running unattended for 8 hours.

    1. s
      silverhawk May 11, 2009 08:48 AM

      i use very little wine in a regular pot roast. i sear a seasoned chuck roast, remove it and deglaze with a bit of red wine. then i add a little can of tomato paste, cook it out for a few minutes and toss in a couple of chunked onions, some sacrificial carrots cut crossways, a few bay leaves, 3-4 sprigs of time, and some pepper corns. put the roast back in and add enough beef stock to raise liquid about half way up the roast. braise covered at low heat for, say, 3 hrs. about an hour before dinner, i add the "serving" carrots, cut lengthwise to be readily distinguished from their now cooked-out compadres, and some peeled, cut potatoes. when these vegetables are cooked, remove all and put the meat, onions serving carrots and potatoes in a warming oven. strain and separate the sauce, discarding the thyme, bay and sacrificial carrots. make a roux and then gravy using the pan sauce supplemented with broth if required. correct seasoning and ring the bell.

      1. l
        Lisbet May 11, 2009 04:49 AM

        I prefer to do it with my Crockpot. Use a good piece of beef bottom of the round (or whatever)...about 3 pounds, more or less. Give that piece a good rub-down with salt and pepper and brown on all sides in bacon fat & olive oil in a pot on stove-top. Put your peeled carrots, onions, garlic cloves, celery stalks with some of the green leaves attached onto the bottom of the Crockpot. Also, I have used small unpeeled potatoes (Youkon Gold, or red). Could also use parsnips or turnips, if desired.

        The vegetables serve as a bed for the pot roast, so place the browned meat on top of the vegies. Sprinkle an envelope of Lipton's Onion Soup mix over the meat. Add a can of beef broth, and/or a can of cream of mushroom soup, or cream of celery soup. Cover the Crockpot, set on high and you can forget it for the next 7 or 8 hours! At times I add some sauteed mushrooms at the very end.

        This will make a whole lot of liquid, so during the last half hour (or so) of cooking, I ladel out some into a small sauce pan and add enough AP flour (also seasonings) to thicken all of the juices in the Crockpot. Return this mixture back into Crockpot. You will have losts of gravy for reheating the meat for subsequent meals, and for mashed potatoes. I use some of that left over gravy by adding to tomato sauce when we have a saghetti meal....turns tomato sauce into a delicious meat flavored sauce.

        Anything left over can be frozen.

        1. chef chicklet May 10, 2009 04:25 PM

          I think my favorite is a Chuck Roast. I sear it on all sides, then let it braise in this heavy two handled pan with a lid. When I bought it, it was called, a satua-forgive the spelling, that's all I know about this pan. It's a wonderful cooking vessel for braising and that's exactly how I handle the pot roast. I flour and season it, push pieces of fresh garlic into it, and then brown it on all sides, edges too. Then I pour a bottle of dark red over the entire thing. Zinfadel, or a nice Burgundy. Add celery, onion, carrots, more garlic, finally potatoes about about an hour before it should be done.
          I like to add beef broth or stock, then thicken it to the consistency of a nice gravy.
          After I thicken the sauce, and prior to serving, I add fresh parsly and chives. I've served it with wide egg noodles, and potatoes. Even though it has potatoes, this goes lovely with mashed potatoes. You might as well forget counting calories go ahead and make some lovely biscuits or rolls, that would be perfect.

          It's truly a comfort food.

          2 Replies
          1. re: chef chicklet
            greygarious May 10, 2009 06:59 PM

            Would the pan be a sauteuse? I'm not sure how those are different from chef's pans (aka sauciers). My saucier gets a lot of use for stews and soups, and can stand in for a wok, but for pot roast it's the Dutch oven. I sear a 4# boneless chuck roast or round roast in a little oil, then add at least 2# sliced onions, a sliced garlic clove, a couple of bay leaves, and 6-8 whole cloves, plus pepper and salt (I use very little salt). Covered, it gets simmered very gently on top of the stove, periodically stirred and turned a few times, until fork-tender, which takes a good 2-3 hours depending on shape of the roast. It forms its own sauce, which reduces a lot and does not need thickening.

            1. re: chef chicklet
              d
              Diane in Bexley May 11, 2009 12:48 PM

              My favorite is a 7 bone chuck roast, which is increasingly hard to find at any market in my town. It seems that the grocery stores/butchers have convinced themselves that Americans only want boneless cuts of meat. The bone adds collagen, a nice somewhat gluey texture that really adds flavor, either with a solid roast or with stew (I buy separate packages of beef bones if I forget to order bone-in roast in advance).

            2. alwayscooking May 10, 2009 01:50 PM

              The wine I save for the boeuf bourguignon (which is just French pot roast). If it's Irish, I add the beer.

              A roast is seared with pepper only, put in a roaster with some homemade beef stock, a bay leaf, and garlic cloves. It roasts VERY slowly (`225) until nearly done. At that time, I pull out the gravy, put in carrots, onions, and potatoes and cook for the last hour. While it is finishing, I reduce and thicken the gravy with a roux and season.

              2 Replies
              1. re: alwayscooking
                Botch May 11, 2009 09:08 AM

                Well, I was going to post, but this is my favorite too, word for word, except if I'm feeling like it I might poke the garlic cloves into the roast all over. I usually spend a day making my own beef stock before I get started. But just beef/garlic/bay leaf flavor/pepper seems better than so many fancier preperations.

                Though pot au feu is a close second favorite, but a lot more work.

                Oh, just read that the op was looking for variations :)
                One of my favorites was a guiness braise. I reduced a bottle of guiness (or any stout or porter) down until it was getting pretty thick, then added that to beef stock, pepper, sauteed onions. I probably put some thyme or sage in there, maybe both, then seared and braised the roast at 225. It was very nice, the stout's flavor really came through, and I'd make it again.

                1. re: Botch
                  alwayscooking May 11, 2009 09:11 AM

                  So with you on the simplicity of this dish - the homemade beef stock with the juice from the roast makes the gravy almost unbearably rich. I serve it with buttered egg noodles and a horseradish cream.

              2. l
                Lisbet May 10, 2009 01:39 PM

                I prefer to do it with my Crockpot. Use a good piece of beef bottom of the round (or whatever)...about 3 pounds, more or less. Give that piece a good rub-down with salt and pepper and brown on all sides in bacon fat & olive oil in a pot on stove-top. Put your peeled carrots, onions, garlic cloves, celery stalks with some of the green leaves attached onto the bottom of the Crockpot. Also, I have used small unpeeled potatoes (Youkon Gold, or red). Could also use parsnips or turnips, if desired.

                The vegetables serve as a bed for the pot roast, so place the browned meat on top of the vegies. Sprinkle an envelope of Lipton's Onion Soup mix over the meat. Add a can of beef broth, and/or a can of cream of mushroom soup, or cream of celery soup. Cover the Crockpot, set on high and you can forget it for the next 7 or 8 hours! At times I add some sauteed mushrooms at the very end.

                This will make a whole lot of liquid, so during the last half hour (or so) of cooking, I ladel out some into a small sauce pan and add enough AP flour (also seasonings) to thicken all of the juices in the Crockpot. Return this mixture back into Crockpot. You will have losts of gravy for reheating the meat for subsequent meals, and for mashed potatoes. I use some of that left over gravy by adding to tomato sauce when we have a saghetti meal....turns tomato sauce into a delicious meat flavored sauce.

                Anything left over can be frozen.

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