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Skillet Pizza?

Does anyone have the America's Test Kitchen/Cook's Illustrated recipe for Skillet Pizza? I think it's in their new skillet cookbook. Would love to try to make a pizza in my 12-in. cast iron skillet. Any skillet pizza recipes you can recommend would be appreciated. Thanks!

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  1. I don't have the recipe you requested but I make a pizza in my cast iron skillet. The "crust" is made with ground chicken. I spread about a pound of the ground chicken into the skillet and form a lip like I would with bread pizza crust. I bake it for 10 minutes at 450. I put buffalo wing sauce on and for the cheese I use a combination of blue cheese, blue cheese dressing, sargento pizza cheese and bake for another 10 mins.

    3 Replies
    1. re: folprivate

      I would hardly call that a pizza. There are many variations of pizza around the world, but ground chicken, buffalo wings sauce and salad dressing baked in an oven isn't one of them. You need at least a base of bread and you should at least be able to pick it up at some point and eat it out of hand.

      1. re: SQHD

        I'd like to say I am sorry I offended your sense of what a pizza should be. But when you are on a low carb diet and you happen to like "traditional" buffalo chicken pizza, spinach feta sundried tomato, or even a parmesan chicken pizza then the pizza I described definitely satisfies your jones'n. And surprisingly your mind doesn't realize there is no bread crust and you can pick it up in your hand and eat it.

        1. re: folprivate

          It's OK, apology accepted.

          I think this is one of those cases however, when the majority of people can say "yeah, right" when you say "your mind doesn't realize there is no bread crust".

          In reality, this ground chicken patty covered in hot sauce and cheese is far closer to a casserole or even a chicken burger than it is a pizza.

          When I think skillet pizza, I think of Chicago style pizza.

    2. I don't have that recipe but if you're talking about actual pizza - with pizza dough - then I've done it many times. It's not my favorite method but it's very fast: spray or otherwise lightly coat the pan when it gets hot, dump the stretched dough in, cook on one side lightly, then flip (probably don't need to spray or coat that side but you may), then top. I find a lighter hand with toppings is necessary. You can also cook only on one side but I like it better this way; it's more like a griddle cooked bread.

      Sorry if that's not a help.

      1. This may help some.

        http://events.nytimes.com/recipes/670...

        1. Here's a link to the requested recipe:

          Skillet Pizza - Cooks Country, August/September, 2008
          http://community.compuserve.com/n/pfx...

          5 Replies
          1. re: Antilope

            Thanks! I'll give it a try. I thought the recipe would be more like something you put in a cast-iron skillet and stick in the oven. But I'll give this a try and see how it goes. I have a open can of beer in the fridge, so that will be handy. Which leads to another question:

            I have been opening cans of beer to use to make the Cook's Illustrated Almost No-Knead Bread and not sure how to use up the rest of it since my husband and I don't really drink beer. I covered the can with foil and put it in the fridge. It's probably too flat to drink now anyway, but can I still cook with it?

            1. re: Sunny Days

              Have you tried Beer Can Chicken? It really is as good as all that. The skin comes out absolutely delicious and the meat is moist and tasty. Easy to do, funny to look at, and a good way to use up the open cans.

              1. re: rockycat

                Thanks for suggestions, rockycat and weezycom. rockycat, do you have a specific recipe for Beer Can Chicken?

                1. re: Sunny Days

                  There are recipes all over the net, but this is a pretty standard one.

                  http://www.barbecuebible.com/featured...

                  You don't need the rub if you don't want to be bothered. It will still come out delicious. You can grill it straight, too, without the wood chips if you don't have any. It's more about the technique than the ingredients. You can play with it anyway you like.

              2. re: Sunny Days

                add it to the cooking water when you're steaming shellfish. It's also a good hair rinse (after shampoo, before conditioner, to get out any leftover shampoo residue).