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Casual dining in the 6th

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mbd23 May 4, 2009 01:55 PM

We will be in Paris next week and have read lots of good suggestions here. We need some recs for a casual dinner with authentic French food in this area as well. Also, good baguettes and cheese shops near rue Cassette? Thanks.

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    Oakglen RE: mbd23 May 4, 2009 02:59 PM

    Le Bon St. Pourcain is a few blocks away; doesn't look like much, I admit, but a truly authentic bistrot that hasn't changed with the times. Give it a look; they even have a "five & dime" web site.

    3 Replies
    1. re: Oakglen
      m
      mbd23 RE: Oakglen May 4, 2009 04:17 PM

      Looks great. Any suggestions from the menu? Thanks so much.

      1. re: mbd23
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        Oakglen RE: mbd23 May 5, 2009 07:12 AM

        That menu is probably out of date; it is always good to order dishes that are seasonal and fresh. You have picked a fine time of year for your visit; just don't expect too much (the Sole isn't going to be Dover Sole, for example).

        1. re: mbd23
          tbwenzlau RE: mbd23 May 8, 2009 05:32 AM

          Can definitely say that Le Bon St. Pourcain is great. I love the atmosphere of the place very simple and quiet, but the food is good. I haven't been in a few months so can't give menu recommendations.

      2. hychka RE: mbd23 May 4, 2009 05:21 PM

        BTW...I'll be in Paris Friday morning!!! Yipee!!!

        A while back PhilD answered a similar question so well I save it. Here it is with full credit to PhilD..................................................................................................................................................

        PhilD said,....

        I used to live on that corner. There are three main options:

        1. Head across Boulevard St Germain and continue down Rue du Bac, you will pass great but expensive restaurants like "Gaya" and "L'Atelier Joel Robuchon", after these on the left is rue de Verneuil, along this street are a few interesting restaurants, our favourite was "Le Cinq Mars", not too expensive, quite buzzy and with quite a local following.

        2. Turn right and head along Boulevard St Germain until you get to rue de Buci, you will have passed "Brasserie Lipp", "Cafe Flore" etc, these are historic and interesting but very expensive. Head left down Buci and you will pass a lot of average places, but then head down rue du Seine and you will find "Fish" this is very good and well priced. Further down rue du Seine is a bar called "La Palette", it has some nice outside tables (but ask the waiter to seat you as they have a strict table allocation system) and is very popular with students from the art college and art dealers from the area. Lots of great scenery for the 17 and 19 year old...!

        3. Head up rue du Bac from your hotel, there are some cafes on the rue du Bac but they are patchy and can be very expensive (you are in the embassey/ministry area, and the Prime Minister lives in rue de Varenne at the Hotel Matignon hence the police presence). Keep going until you are past Bon Marche (a very good food hall) and have reached rue de Cherche-Midi. "Cafe Nemrod" on the corner is good, basic and cheap for salads, duck confit etc. Turn right and you eventually get to "Chez Josephine Dumonet" which is very traditional and very good, turn left and you head in to the expensive shopping area of St Germain so the restaurants can be patchy.

        Other thoughts. Around the Marche St Germain there are lots of cheap Pizza places, good for fuel but average food. Along rue de Grenelle (from Raspail) are some young bars and cafes and a restaurant called "A La Petit Chaise" that David Liebovitz recently reviewed - http://www.davidlebovitz.com/archives...

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        PhilD Apr 24, 2009 02:31AM

        1. souphie RE: mbd23 May 5, 2009 03:15 AM

          Close to rue Cassette is Gérard Mulot (on rue de Seine), where everything is good (a boulanger patissier. President Mitterand used to get his croissants from there. Have them brought, I should say). For cheese, there are decent places in the Marché Saint Germain but I would walk ten minutes to Place Maubert and buy extraordinary cheese from Laurent Dubois.

          1. k
            kleaps RE: mbd23 May 6, 2009 10:56 AM

            Le Relais de l'Entrecote is one of my favorites: http://www.relaisentrecote.fr/

            1 Reply
            1. re: kleaps
              Peech RE: kleaps May 7, 2009 09:08 PM

              Passed by on my last trip. Haven't been to the one in Paris but the one in Geneva (which has the same owner I believe) was great.

              L'Atelier is indeed very casual but more on the expensive side. All counter seats and you can chat with your neighbors.

            2. tbwenzlau RE: mbd23 May 8, 2009 05:39 AM

              One of my favorite places that is not in the 6th, but is only like a 15 minute walk down blvd. Saint Germain in the 5 is Le Petit Pontoise. It has absolutely amazing food and is not expensive at all. (Aroung 20 euros for a main course.) It is not too big and always full. I find that it has a casual atmosphere because it is generally loud with people talking. A great place to go.

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                ljljrich RE: mbd23 May 10, 2009 04:58 PM

                I have to disagree about Le Bon St. Pourcain. I found it dreary, and I had the worst meal I have ever had in Paris there. Run, don't walk from there. You might consider L'Epi Dupin and Le Petit Pontoise, For the best croissant you will ever have, go to Pierre Herve, 72 Rue Bonaparte (2 blocks south of the Blvd St Germain. Their standard croissant is wonderful. Their croissant Pamphylla (lightly glazed, filled with almond paste and dots of raspberry paste) is one of the most amazing things I have ever eaten (and I don't have much of a sweet tooth). Have a wonderful time.

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