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Bamboo salt

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meimei May 3, 2009 01:12 PM

While I was shopping in the Korean market today, I saw "bamboo salt." Never heard of it or seen it before. I did a quick google & chow search. There are a few sites on google mentioning this salt has several medicinal usage to it. You can use it to brush your teeth, wash your face, have a pedi, etc. Chow's story on 10 unique salts thinks it can replace table salt, and not much more than that. Has anyone actually use this before? Does it taste different than sea salt or table salt?

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  1. todao RE: meimei May 3, 2009 03:23 PM

    It's a lot of hype, meimei. Don't waste your money. But then again some folks believe certain animal parts can be used as aphrodisiacs (the more bizzare the better) so I guess they can spend their money on whatever they choose.
    I'm considering marketing specially processed powdered claw extraction of Impeyan Monal (Lophophorus impejanus) as a phytopharmica. Never know, I might make a billion bucks.

    2 Replies
    1. re: todao
      ipsedixit RE: todao May 3, 2009 10:59 PM

      Don't knock Eastern medicine until you've tried it.

      1. re: ipsedixit
        todao RE: ipsedixit May 4, 2009 07:47 AM

        I spent a few years in the far east. I've done the "Eastern medicine" thing. I rest my case.

    2. Caroline1 RE: meimei May 3, 2009 07:59 PM

      I've hear it's preferred by 9 out of 10 pandas. People? Not so much.

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        another_adam RE: meimei May 3, 2009 10:06 PM

        I'm a big fan of bamboo salt toothpaste-- not so much because I believe that it has special properties compared to regular salt, but rather, because I'd far rather my toothpaste to taste like salt than like candy. (I've never understood who thought toothpaste should be sweet!) Taste-wise, the salt doesn't seem all that special, though-- but I have no evidence for or against the health claims :)

        1. ipsedixit RE: meimei May 3, 2009 10:58 PM

          It's good for keeping the ants out of the house.

          1 Reply
          1. re: ipsedixit
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            meimei RE: ipsedixit May 6, 2009 05:22 PM

            Huh? really? how?

          2. hannaone RE: meimei May 3, 2009 10:59 PM

            To those who like it, the bamboo salt has a better flavor.
            It's simple to make it.
            Cut a hollow bamboo stem into several pieces, seal one end and fill each section with salt then seal the open end. Place the filled bamboo sections in an oven set to broil and scorch the bamboo (the surface just begins to blacken) on all sides. Remove from oven, let cool, then use the salt as you would standard salt.

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              loveofadonai RE: meimei Feb 9, 2011 03:00 PM

              I'm sorry to see so many nay-sayers out there. I have a friend who was poor who had an abscessed tooth, found out about Bamboo salt, washed her mouth with it religiously and never had to worry again. Another friend had the same problem, I told her about it and she used it....with enough success to ask me where to buy more...I had given her a small amount of mine. I bought mine back in the late '90's in Korea and just keep it around for emergencies, it's still effective over a decade later.
              As far as Eastern medicines go...I would rather put that stuff in my body than chemicals unless it doesn't work on me....all of our bodies are different and just as with western meds, & Dr's. , Eastern ones can also be quack's.

              Do your own research and don't let nay-sayers get in your way.

              BTW, likely not all, but mine for sure...Bamboo salt tastes and smells like sulfur... has since day I bought it.

              2 Replies
              1. re: loveofadonai
                scubadoo97 RE: loveofadonai Feb 9, 2011 03:39 PM

                But was it the bamboo or the salt that cured your friends abscessed tooth? Salt water rinses are commonly used after dental surgery to rinse away food particles and the salt helps to reduce bacterial growth.

                1. re: scubadoo97
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                  loveofadonai RE: scubadoo97 Feb 9, 2011 04:11 PM

                  Well, if you research it, you will discover that it was indeed both elements....but in the most simplistic of terms... she had used salt (table salt) and knowing the Koreans and the Buddhist's, which she was living amongst at the time....she likely had tried many things, even sea salt.
                  Education on any matter is of course important but seeing how GOD created all things to benefit us and gave us the brains to learn how to use them....how did the first person who ate a mushroom (or any food) know it was not going to kill them (since many do and many are hallucinogenics) but instead be a wonderful source of protein as well as having other beneficial properties.... anyway...off my soap box now!

                  Even for those who doubt the existence of a god/creator, appreciate how many things are in existence that we can use as natural medications and the diversity of uses as well as the diversity of applications for singular flora's and fauna's.

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