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DFW -- Grass-Fed Bison

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Where can you buy grass-fed bison in the Dallas area? Central Market only has grain-fed bison.

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  1. Info obtained here:
    http://www.texasbison.org/

    Local Guys - give em a call and go and visit!

    http://www.buffalowind.com/

    http://www.wildphilsbuffaloranch.com/ - in Milam County
    O'Neil, Melanie - Wild Phil's Buffalo Ranch - (214)448-0580

    http://www.texasbuffaloexchange.com/ - I bet they know some people who can help you out.

    Harris, Mark - Rockin H Ranch TX Buffalo Feedlot - (940)482-6173

    Miskin, Cecil - 2HL Buffalo Ranch - (817)447-7473

    Wenzel, Kent - Wenzel Lone Star Meat - (254)386-8242

    Wenzel, Ronny - Six Spokes Ranch - (254)386-5069

    Further Away but still in Texas
    http://luckybbison.com/

    http://www.thunderheartbison.com/ - big in Austin and San Antone

    http://www.bisonprovision.com/ - Grain Fed

    Not a big proponent of Oklahoma but here is their info:
    http://www.okbison.com/roster.htm

    1 Reply
    1. re: LewisvilleHounder

      Sprouts has bison - can't recall if it's grass-fed or grain.

    2. The last two times I have bought ground bison at the Central Market in Plano, it has been extremely fat. I took the last back and they agreed it was Not bison! Even though it was labeled as such. You might want to buy your ground bison at whole foods. At least there it is really bison!

      1. I'm confused ... Central Market told me their bison comes from a free-ranging, basically wild, herd. Did they lie to me? I also thought it was impossible to 'farm' bison the way cows are ... I thought it was relatively impossible to feed them other than their natural diet. Have I been misinformed??

        I have also gotten relatively fatty bison from Central Market a couple of times ...

        ETA: Here's what texasbison.org has to say:

        "Bison that we eat today is farm raised, not wild but still offers the health advantages of their ancestors. Bison are raised on pasture which produces a lean and healthy meat. Some producers ‘finish out’ the animals on grain, others grow a grass-fed product."

        2 Replies
        1. re: foiegras

          After several recent reports back from people shelling out an enormous amount of money I have come to doubt the quality of any of the Central Market meats.

          I am not sure of how the herd is raised at Central Market but I would assume if all you give the bison is grain during the winter months then they would in essence be very similar to raising cows. I could be wrong though.

          If you are concerned try calling one of the vendors I listed above and talking bison with them. They deal with them daily and would know infinitely more about them than a butcher at Central Market. I am not disputing nor agreeing with your statements. If you do ending up calling one of the vendors above could youreport back with your findings?

          1. re: foiegras

            I assure you that you can raise bison just the way that you raise cows. You just need a stouter fence, especially if you have a bull of your own. They will eat grass. They will eat hay. And they will certainly come up and eat range cubes or grain if you'll feed it. You can also finish them at home (or at a feed lot) on grain. Whether you choose to do so purely depends on whether you prefer the taste and fat content of grain finished beef.

          2. I was told at Whole Foods that their Bison is grass fed and then "finished" on grain.

            3 Replies
            1. re: twinwillow

              I just don't get why they would do that ('finish' on grain, whatever that means--at what point does that finishing start??) ... but at least they're telling you the truth at WF.

              LH, yes, I will report back on any research I do.

              1. re: foiegras

                It's really no different than beef. All steers and cows raised for their meat are raised on grass. Then, they are finished (fattened) at the stockyards on grain or corn. True grass fed beef (like Burgundy Beef and others) are never finished on grains or corn. They're born eating grass and die eating grass.
                Pretty much the same goes for Bison. With some exceptions.

                1. re: twinwillow

                  I just meant, if you're going to do things the conventional way, why not just do it with cows? Maybe there's a premium for bison ... at Central Market, you pay the same for bison as for premium beef.

                  The bison site says they don't need antibiotics because they're native ... but of course that's not why cows are given antibiotics ... it's because the unnatural diet of corn makes them sick. Bison have the same type of digestive system, so I wonder what the difference is?

                  I originally asked about the source of the bison when the Bush administration sent the bison in Yellowstone to slaughter--I wanted to make sure I wasn't buying that meat. I'm going to have a chat with them next time I'm at the butcher counter & see what story I get this time.

            2. Just wanted to note that I have bought grass-fed bison at Patina Green on the square in McKinney. All their meats are sold frozen.

              1. Just bought some at the Sprouts in Coppell yesterday. They have a bunch of flyers up like it is either a new product or a short-time promo.

                3 Replies
                1. re: smcleroy

                  Sprouts also offers the best organic grass fed beef I've had in Dallas. Although they offer steaks and roasts, the ground meat makes really good burgers.
                  The meat comes from Uruguey. But don't let that put you off. It's delicious!

                  1. re: twinwillow

                    The US gets great grass fed beef from Uruguay, but not much of it - maybe 6 million pounds/ year. The same genuine grass fed beef is in Argentina and Brazil, but we are hopelessly embroiled with endless puerile tit-for-tat duties and restrictions with both countries, involving numerous foodstuffs: meat, vegetables, and citrus. And car parts.

                    If you come across Uruguayan beef, by all means try it, it's the real deal.

                    P.S. "Grain finished" is a sneakier term than one might think. Example: a baby may be "started" on mama's milk, but may be "finished" on commercial dairy products for life's remainder...

                    1. re: Veggo

                      I had similar experiences with the fat ratio in bison bought from central market and market street. The best I have found to date is at whole foods but it will run you 9 bucks a pound. It is very lean though which is what I was looking for. I will check out sprouts as well and see what they have to offer.