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Cooper's BBQ in FT. Worth?

I have been reading for over a year about how great the bbq from Cooper's in the Hill Country is. A few days ago, a buddy of mine from Ft. Worth told me that they were opening a Ft Worth location down in the Stockyards. Is this true? Is it actually a second location? Any info will be greatly appreciated.

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  1. Nobody here has heard anything about the Cooper's opening in Ft Worth? I figured that people would be jumping all over this topic since there are so many threads on here referring to the legendary Hill Country BBQ.

    1. I had posted on this a while back after reading an article about it. All you have to do is google it and you'll find much info.
      http://www.nbcdfw.com/around_town/din...

      1. I read today at DFW.com that Cooper's is slated to open the first(?) week in Dec.

        1 Reply
        1. re: CocoaNut

          Coopers in Fort Worth is now open, opened earlier this week -- anyone been yet?

        2. Personally speaking, I'm not a great fan of Cooper's BBQ. I much prefer Black's, Smitty's and my favorite, Louie Mueller's. Just my (humble) opinion.

          5 Replies
              1. re: pinotho

                I was just talking to a friend of mine that tried out the new Cooper's this past week for lunch. I guess he looked into one of the smokers a saw a pork chop that he had to try. When he got to the end of the line where you actually pay, he discovered that the chop was 21 dollars. I think that ruined his experience. His plan was to just get a brisket sandwich and then come back on the weekend for a full on bbq meal. But the chop got him and he paid dearly for it.

                He did say that the chop was "delicious" and too big to finish. So thats a good sign.

                1. re: down73

                  Cooper’s BBQ is different.

                  It is not Texas, Kansas City, Memphis or Carolina style BBQ. II was told that their BBQ is influenced by the German heritage of the settlers in the Texas Hill Country. I've lived in all of the above areas and have tried them all.

                  It is cooked without sauce. The sauce they have is not like any other I've tried either. It has more vinegar than even that served in the Carolina's. ... See More

                  No one in our party could tell what the dry rub spices were, beyond the salt and pepper. There was something else we guessed as being dill on the meat.

                  They only serve meats by the pound. You go to the pit and tell the pit man what and which piece(s) you want. None of the meats (we sampled them all) had a smoked taste.

                  All sides except for beans and white bread are served alla-cart.

                  Cooper's is in a great location next door to Billy Bob's which draws a lot of tourists.........but Tourists will not get Texas BBQ at Cooper's.

                  1. re: adman1201

                    Have to disagree adman. Coopers is Texas BBQ in it's most authentic traditional form. They do all their cooking over hot coals, oak to be specific, just like like those Cowboys did on the range. No, rotisserie oven, no smokers just directly on hot coals and that is real Texas BBQing. There is a real art to it . Prices are $5-$6 pp higher than Llano but hey it's The Stockyards.

          1. My brisket was moist, mildly smokey and had large chunks of fat hanging on. I'm a big fan of the brisket as it was a nice departure from the tight grained, dry brisket I get most other places around here.

            FWIW, I asked for a fatty cut, which was an end. This obviously explains the extra fat (not a bad thing to me) and possibly explains why mine seemed smokier than most people describe Cooper's as.

            Cabrito, Beef rib, and sausage were all good, but nothing to write home about.

            1. Great for the chops and sirloin, disappointing if you want brisket. The meat is cooked so fast only the lean meats turn out well.
              It's about the meat indeed. To me, the brisket fat should be melted by the time it is served.
              The brisket was very fat. No effort to trim it before weighing it.
              The pit man said "it's not BBQ without sauce" . Kinda sad thing to say if it all about the meat. Obviously he had never been to Smitty's in Lockhart where sauce is not used and not needed.
              I saw how he was cutting it, and asked for "a couple of inches of brisket"..he said "you want a 1/4 or a 1/2 lb?".
              Why would he ask that? I don't know... a couple of inches/ slices.
              The lean meats were pretty good. The chop is the only thing I will ever order now.
              The links were like salamis; firm and not much good.
              They served the meat directly on to the red plastic trays. A perfectly good piece of butcher paper seems to be more than they can trust the pit man with.
              The people away from the pit are nice.
              My dog was happy. She got the fat brisket when I got home. There is enough fat left to serve her some Monday and Tuesday.

              2 Replies
              1. re: momisfromtaylor

                I learned to stop using sauce on my 'Q many, many years ago after first eating in those hallowed halls of BBQ in Taylor and Lockhart. Now I only put sauce on my 'Q in Dallas. You have to!

                1. re: twinwillow

                  We ate for the first time at Cooper's BBQ at the Fort Worth Stockyards. Without question, we will not be returning. Cooper's is an overpriced tourist trap.

                  The meat had very little flavor and was very expensive. I could not even taste a smoke flavor on the meat and the ribs had the texture of having been boiled prior to being cooked. The price for 3 ribs was $9.00. I purchased some cabritos and discovered that I bought about $8.00 of bone and $2.00 of meat. Nice work by the "pit man" to preserve Cooper's profit margin.

                  If you live in the Dallas/Fort Worth area, save yourself the gas and frequent your favorite neighborhood bbq establishment.