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Cocktails featuring Fee Brother's Bitters?

t
TimeMachine Mar 15, 2009 07:44 PM

I just bought a bottle of Fee Brother's Old Fashioned Bitters and was wondering if anyone had a cocktail recipe they wouldn't mind sharing that was particularly good with this flavor of bitters. I'm a little stumped as to what to mix with such a strong cinnamony spice flavor.

(ps - I already have Angostura and Peychaud's so I'm not looking for any old cocktail recipe that has bitters in it. However, if one of the old standbys like a Manhattan or Sazerac or something is recommended using this bitter in particular, I'm up for suggestions.)

Thanks in advance!

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  1. s
    Shortsord RE: TimeMachine Mar 15, 2009 09:17 PM

    I did not know of this brand of bitters before you mentioned it, but now that I know it I've already ordered a bottle. Thank you.

    A look on their website, and they have a small list of cocktails they recommend, most of them being simple standbuy's really, but the Brandy Cocktail caught my eye. I used to get something just like that over ice made with Calvados at a friends house, and I think that with bitters like that it would be really good.

    Also, I once for a party infused a bottle of rye with some cinnamon to make some special manhattans, and they were fantastic(what few we poured before someone broke the bottle in the sink). Perhaps making a manhattan with those instead of angostura might be swell.

    1 Reply
    1. re: Shortsord
      t
      TimeMachine RE: Shortsord Mar 16, 2009 12:09 AM

      I'm a lamer because I went to the Fee's website (I thought) and tried to find recipes and failed. I blame it on visiting family distracting me. I'll check again. Thanks--Manhattan were the first (and only) thing I thought that might work w/this bitters.

    2. c
      craigasaurus RE: TimeMachine Mar 16, 2009 07:45 AM

      TimeMachine, the Fee's Old Fashioned Bitters are generally best treated as a more-flavorful substitute for Angustura. They can be used in any recipe that normally calls for Angostura. Your best bet would probably be to mix up your favorite recipe twice, one using the Angosture and the other using Fee's, and do a side-by-side comparison to see which you prefer. I'm guessing you'll notice that the two won't taste overwhelmingly different, because bitters are used in such small quantities and lend very subtle flavor notes to drinks. But you might be surprised how the base flavors jump out at you differently. One oft-repeated adage is that bitters are to cocktails as salt is to soup; that is to say, they are a seasoning meant to enhance and tie together the base flavors in the drink.

      On a side note: While I very much prefer Fee's Old Fashioned to Angostura, I think Angostura's Orange bitters are vastly superior to Fee's Orange bitters...

      1. j
        junco31 RE: TimeMachine Mar 30, 2009 06:29 PM

        I just ordered some Fee Bros. Bitters myself. I would suggest trying the old fashioned bitters in a Pisco sour. The bitters (usually angostura) is dripped onto the foam from the egg white after pouring, and, in my opinion, is meant to sit on top, under your nose, as you drink it. The angostura gives a wonderful aroma as you drink, and I can't wait to try some of the other types of bitters in this application. I normally use Regans no 6 orange bitters when making a vesper or classic martini, and Peychauds with a sazerac. I am looking forward to experimenting with some of these new (to me) flavors. Cheers!

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