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Where can I buy halloumi cheese in Boston?

Preferably T accessible.

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    1. I've found it at Stop & Shop -- both South Bay and Morrissey Blvd.

        1. shaws porter square has it

          1. I have found that La Queseria brand Queso Blanco makes a pretty darn good substitute. It's less than half the price of the Whole Foods brand - Mt. Vikos - and it's not as salty. You can find it at Costco, and I've been going through a ton lately, myself.

            6 Replies
            1. re: almansa

              Mt. Vikos isn't a Whole Foods brand, per se, but a brand sold at Whole Foods....It is imported from Turkey by a South Shore cheese importer with a lot of history in the Boston area, Ron Cardoos. Remember Cardoos Sandwiches and Delis? I think there was one in Boston, and one in Dedham, at least..
              But, if you want a cheaper brand, there a a few good varieties at Arax Market that are much cheaper.

              The big difference between halloumi and the other cheese you mention is that the curds are cooked twice, so that you can cook it over a grill, and it won't fall thru, or in a frying pan, and it won't melt, it will actually 'grill'

              1. re: galleygirl

                Any of the markets on Mt. Auburn Street in Watertown will have it. They're easily accessible by taking the 71 bus, which leaves Harvard Square every 10 minutes or less.

                1. re: galleygirl

                  I know that Mt Vikos isn't a WFM brand. Their halloumi is properly from Cypress, and I like all their products. I only meant to say that, since they're based in Marshfield, it is the most readily available brand, and the one you'll find at WFM. However, I find it unnecessarily expensive, and there is no bulk pack, even wholesale - just those little retail things. So I mention as an alternative the Queso Blanco from Costco, which I cook over charcoal on my grill and fry up in a pan all the time. And no, it doesn't melt.

                  1. re: almansa

                    It probably doesn't melt because it only softens, like feta.....

                  2. re: galleygirl

                    Also noticed the WF has a second, cheaper brand now, the "Original Yanni's Grilling Cheese"; I think it's domestic....I'd head to Vatertown if the Mt.Vikos is tres cher....

                  3. re: almansa

                    I have seen queijo coalho "caseiro" (home made) available in a few local stores both latino and brazilian varieties including the Somerville Ave Brazilian supermarket, which is what is grilled in Brazil (served on street corners and any beach). The commonly available queso de freir (in any store with a good caribbean clientel) is somewhat similar and can be grilled or fried easily, but is pretty industrial tasting so I often sauce it after frying or grilling (I would love to find larger blocks or sheets of this to cut for skewers). There is a hispanic cheese sold locally in sheets (usually in whey) and cut similar to queso blanco, but a bit harder, sometimes called queso duro which doesn't melt and I prefer a bit better (Amigos market in East Somerville usually this this fairly fresh). It doesn't grill quite the same as the above because of the whey, so I prefer frying sliced steak/onions/peppers/... and adding it for a greasy mess. Also since its close to Easter, you can get basket cheese used for meat pies from various sources, which I prefer from calabro in CT (year round) or Supreme (Easter only I think) in RI, which also doesn't melt but has a lot of liquid too (I do like to fry it also, but the steak does overwhelm its taste). That has almost no salt and has to be eaten soon after buying. I also grill domestic provolone ("marinated" with olive oil and oregano) on skewers, but on charcoal sometimes I get it seared and soft... others seared but hard... and sometimes melted and causing flare ups. But you can also put a cast iron pan on the grill and cook either provolone or mozzarella. As long as you have a piece of bread nearby, runny cheese is pretty easy to handle!