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Nutmeg grinder

m
maggiej Mar 10, 2009 10:15 AM

My mother has an antique wooden nutmeg grinder that I covet. All the nutmeg grinders I've seen online/in stores are acrylic, and not that well reviewed.

Should I stick with microplane? Or do you have a grinder you recommend?

  1. jillp Mar 11, 2009 06:02 PM

    William Bounds makes a nutmeg grinder that is excellent. I have the one my husband's step-mother bought over 30 years ago; the cooking store where I work carries exactly the same item.

    In addition to holding one nutmeg against the grinder, the housing can contain at least four more. Also, one is spared the occasional bits of knuckle that are often the by-product of traditional graters.

    1 Reply
    1. re: jillp
      liu Mar 11, 2009 10:41 PM

      jillp - This is the nutmeg grinder that we have, but it has not performed well for us.
      Apparently, there are others who have had the same problems. I refer you - and anyone considering the purchase of this product - to the reviews of this item on Amazon:

      http://www.amazon.com/William-Bounds-...

    2. liu Mar 10, 2009 05:47 PM

      maggiej, we have one of those acrylic nutmeg grinders to which you refer.
      It was good for a few months, but then it kept popping open and didn't grind as well. Also, it never seemed to finish a nutmeg pod, so there was some waste.

      We continued to hope that it would work like it did when it was new, but that did not happen. We gave up on it and returned to the microplane for this procedure.

      The microplane is fine for occasional grinding, but I loved the grinder for frequent use; at its best, it was very effective and easy. I, too, would like to find another grinder that might work well with nutmeg.

      1. paulj Mar 10, 2009 11:10 AM

        How much nutmeg do you need to grind at a time?

        I'm quite happy with the old classic nutmeg grater, a metal tapered half cylinder with hopper in the top to hold the partially used nut (with a flat enclosed back). About an inch in diameter, four or so long. I assume they are still being sold, though I haven't paid attention this.

        3 Replies
        1. re: paulj
          paulj Mar 10, 2009 07:26 PM

          I can't find this style online anywhere except at an antique shop. Mine is made in W Germany. . I also use mine with dried ginger, which is nearly as hard.

          Any grater with the conical teeth works well with nutmeg. This style can be made from any sheet of metal and nail.

          1. re: paulj
            c
            Canthespam Mar 11, 2009 11:19 PM

            paulj - I have the same grater and have used it for years and years. I have no idea if you can still buy them, as I haven't looked. I hang mine on a little hook on the inside of a cupboard door, so it is easy to find and use. I love grated nutmeg on hot chocolate. I use it regularly.

            1. re: Canthespam
              c
              Canthespam Mar 11, 2009 11:22 PM

              I just found one on Amazon for $4.10, so that means that they are still available in houseware stores.

          2. g
            grant.cook Mar 10, 2009 10:31 AM

            Why change if your microplane works fine? I've never had issues.. although I don't grind nutmeg that often, so if you are baking up pies by the dozen, perhaps you need something more.

            But , it seems that you are getting into the classic Alton Brown no no - the unitasker..

            Is the Mother's nutmeg grinder going to be a source of family discord when the will is read? (hopefully many many years away, of course.)

            1 Reply
            1. re: grant.cook
              scubadoo97 Mar 11, 2009 12:20 PM

              I use a microplane. Can't imagine a better grind

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