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Jacque Pepin's Slow & Easy Bread in a Pot

janetms383 Mar 9, 2009 09:02 AM

On an episode of More Fast Food My Way, Jacques Pepin made this recipe. Same ingredients as Artisan Bread in 5 mins, but the technique was different. He heated water until tepid, stirred in the salt and yeast and was pretty relaxed about the amount of yeast. He said one teaspoon, but he didn't measure, I guess you can go under or over that amount with sucessful results. Then he added 4 cups flour, stirred and left the dough proof for 40 mins. Broke it down and then placed it in the refridgerator overnight. The pot he removed he said had been in the fridge for about 12 hours.

Put the pot in a hot oven and baked for 30 mins. He turned it out, but never cut into it so you couldn't see the crumb.

JP stated the crust was crispy, but he didn't cover the pot or use water at the bottom of the oven. So, did anyone get the exact amount of the ingredients? Has anyone tried making this. Does it come out just like the Artisan Bread?

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  1. greygarious Mar 9, 2009 09:49 AM

    Already discussed: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/589286

    1. todao Mar 9, 2009 10:41 AM

      As greygarious mentioned, you'll find the answers for much of what you asked on the thread provided in the "Already discussed" link.
      As for experience with the recipe/technique, I found it to be quite an easy bread to make and it turned out quite well. It's a peasant bread so don't expect anything exotic but it's worth your time and effort (not much effort in it though) to try.
      Check your flour. I somtimes buy flour on sale and most of that is bleached. You'll have better luck with this recipe using unbleached AP flour (assuming, like so many of us, you don't typically have bread flour around)

      1. j
        jrszabo Apr 20, 2009 09:03 AM

        It's probably in his cookbook!

        1. c
          chowhound6969 Jun 5, 2009 03:31 AM

          I made this bread using whole wheat pastry flour, it stuck to the bottom of the pot .

          1. jackie2830 Jul 20, 2009 05:56 AM

            Since I am also "yeastophobic" but love Jacques recipes as well as his laid back attitude I forged ahead. Like the good/seasoned cook I am, I possess the ultimate array of kitchen gadgets which includes both nonstick as well as SS pots/pans from several companies. However, it looked like Jacques used probably a 3qt. nonstick saucepan. My ovenproof Calphalon is 1qt.......my 2qt. & 3 qt. nonstick are Wearevers - not ovenproof to 425. Sooooooo after researching the website to first find the episode plus going online to see if my Wearever's were actually ovenproof I became obscessed with this recipe! I hit Marshall's/TJ's on my lunch hour to see if I could find a low priced facsimile. I, instead found the most wonderful pan which cost $5!!!!! Sorry, can't remember the company name.........knew this would happen.....I believe it was from a German company, however, China made. It is 4" deep, 8" in diameter, [3qt pot size] dark nonstick metal, & works like a springform pan minus the locking mechanism......you just put the bottom in push it down. I figured it would probably leak, so I tested it & it did in fact slowly drip water. To alleviate that little speed bump, I did the prep mixing in a bowl, then poured the thick batter into the pan ------- worked perfectly! No greasing, no parchment! I used plastic wrap as a lid. I knew before buying that it would be useful for cakes as well, so $5. well spent! And now the bread.................YES, I DID IT!!!! Every attempt @ this bread baking excursion was exactly as Jacques both said/displayed.....it proofed beautifully, bubbled overnight beautifully, & baked beautifully! After baking,I went around the inner edge with a knife to loosen, & popped the bottom out. Had to go around the edge of the bottom to loose the very outer edge......no big deal, once around it came right off just like a cheesecake. Like someone stated, it is a chewier, rustic type boule, on the order of Focaccia. I cut the end curve off, then just sliced across to form long slices which we made Pannini's with......brush with ex.virg, add Prosciutto, boccocini, basil leaves, roasted peppers.....my husband went wild! I think this will be great toasted or used for Frence toast as well.
            Hope I am of some help to all! Sorry, didn't think to pic until 3/4 consumed! Bon Appetit!

             
             
            1. t
              TBOOTY53 Apr 5, 2010 06:48 AM

              I was intrigued with this recipe for the ease of it so although I didn't have a non stick pot I decided to go for it anyway....I followed the directions to a "t" except for the pit. After baking for 30-35 minutes I removed it for the oven and let it set for about 15 minutes, then took a knife and went around the edge until I had loosened the bread all the way, it came out very easy. The bread was crusty on the outside and soft on the inside, the texture was airy and had some holes in it because you don't knead the dough to force out the gases but it was delicious, I toasted it the next morning and wow, what a nice crunchy toast...I am making it again today but this time I am using 3 cups all purpose flour and 1 cup of whole wheat flour, I have decided this is the easiest bread I have ever made and will keep this nice Artisan type bread handy at all times. I can't wait to try it with whole wheat.

              1. o
                onslow Jul 24, 2010 05:43 AM

                Has anyone tried to flavor the bread? with rosemary, olives or other things?

                1. b
                  barbriba Nov 8, 2010 12:03 PM

                  I stirred up this bread last night and baked it this AM. Yes the top crust was crispy. The crumb is coarse and moist, not like an Italian Ciabatta. It is more rustic, and chewy. I will do it again, because it is so easy. I used 1 1/2 cups water, 1 teas. salt and 1 teas. yeast. Then stirred in 3 1/2 cups flour. I have a 4 qt . anodized pot, and it rose about 1/3 the way up. I did have to remove the handles beause they are not safe at the 450 degree oven I started the bread at. After 5 - 10 minutes, I turned the oven down to 400. All told, I baked the bread for 40 minutes and took its temp after 40 minutes, a perfect 210 degrees. I let it cool upside down on a trivet for 10 to 15 minutes, and it popped right out of the pan. I'll post a pix next time.

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