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Ottolenghi [The Cookbook]

As was suggested, I am starting a thread on Ottolenghi as I cook my way into the book, I just can't wait until spring to get into this great book. Tonight I am making the salad of hericots vert, snow peas and hazelnuts to accompany our dinner. On Sunday I will be making the Orange Polenta cake that was featured in Gourmet in January. I will report back on both.

Candy

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  1. First very important question: how is this name pronounced? Otto-lang-ghee?

    I can't wait to hear about the orange polenta cake!

    ~TDQ

    19 Replies
    1. re: The Dairy Queen

      I *think* that is about right - though I might say "Otto-leng-ghee". Was so sorry I didn't fit them in on my London trip!

      1. re: MMRuth

        Thanks! For those following along with Candy, here's a link to the orange polenta cake recipe http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/...

        I couldn't find a recipe online for the hericots vert, snow peas and hazelnuts one, alas.
        ~TDQ

        1. re: The Dairy Queen

          You have to translate it into English English. ;-) So green beans and mange tout.

          http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/m...

          ETA - it's probably best to use the original, British English names for the recipes so people can find them easily online. :-)

              1. re: greedygirl

                Now how would you pronounce mange tout. Like, mango (but, how would the *e* be) and stout?

                1. re: cpw

                  mange-a - tout. the "ge" is soft. Not like a dog's mange.

                  1. re: cpw

                    Tout is pronounced "too". The name literally means "eat all" - ie you eat the whole pod.

                    1. re: greedygirl

                      Thank you both. I would have definitely failed my spelling test!
                      Is assume the root is latin.

                        1. re: MMRuth

                          The Brits often use the French word for veg. ..Mange Tout, Aubergine, Courgette.

                      1. re: greedygirl

                        There's also no "a" at the end of mange. It's "monge" (soft like the second g in garage) then "too".

                  2. re: MMRuth

                    That is how i have been pronouncing it. Too bad you missed it, but welcome home.

                    1. re: Candy

                      I did eat well though - you may want to check out my trip report on the UK board for future trips!

                      1. re: MMRuth

                        I'll take a look. We're going back next March/April for 2 weeks. 35th anniversary trip. Last time 2 years ago we went in October. My birthday trip. That is where I first encountered Ottolenghi. Gorgeous shop and the weather could not have been better. I love London. We had our 30th anniversary at Le Gavroche, fabulous meal. We'll be going back there for sure.

                        CKG

                        1. re: Candy

                          Do post on my UK thread should you have any questions. There were lots of places that I wanted to try, but didn't make it to.

                    2. re: MMRuth

                      Yes, "Otto-len-ghee" should be correct. No double g, I think.

                  3. Mushroom Parcel
                    http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian...

                    Although I did not follow it precisely, this recipe inspired me last week. I used cremini, button, shitake, and a small amount of dried morel. I also replaced the chervil and tarragon with parsley and thyme (they were in the ref) and the only alcohol in the cupboard was cognac. To even further deviate, I cooked it on the stove in a pot. Some of the mushrooms were sliced and seared while the others were left whole or quartered - I thought it would make the texture more interesting.

                    It was great!

                    I served the ragout over 'pancakes' made from garbanzo flour. The textures and flavors "mated" (see other thread!) very well(!). The next morning the mushrooms, along with spinach, ended up in an omelet and in the evening became the basis for a pasta sauce.

                    I will definitely make this again. And I might even follow the recipe!

                    1 Reply
                    1. I've made quite a few dishes from the book, but I'll start with the ones I did at the weekend, which are fresh in my mind.

                      Marinated rack of lamb with coriander and honey (p104)
                      http://eattherightstuff.squarespace.c...

                      This was very easy - you whizz up the marinade the night before and leave in the fridge overnight. When ready to cook, remove the meat from the marinade and shake off the excess. Sear on a hot griddle and then cook in the oven. I did it for the suggested 15 minutes, which gave quite rare lamb. I would probably leave it a couple of minutes more next time. The sauce is made from the reserved marinade, gently heated.

                      This was absolutely delicious - meltingly tender with a beautifully balanced, herby sauce. Very good for a dinner party, as there's hardly anything to do on the night.

                      I served it with the butterbeans in sweet chilli sauce and fresh herbs (p72

                      )

                      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddri...

                      I used dried beans but I've also made it with canned. I think dried and freshly cooked is better, as you can dress the salad while they're still warm, and the beans really absorb the flavours. But canned is fine at a pinch. Basically you combined the cooked beans with a dressing made from garlic, sweet chilli sauce, sesame oil, lemon juice, coriander and mint. You also add a couple of chopped red peppers and some spring onions.

                      Again, very tasty indeed, and Mr GG enjoyed the leftovers for lunch at work. A great accompaniement to the lamb.

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: greedygirl

                        We made this dish a few weeks ago as written with big dried polish lima beans. It was very favored by all, but I thought the mint did not add anything - it would have been better in my view with just the cilantro - tasted better and clearer before the mint went in.

                      2. I'm going to make the meringues today. I see that their website has some recipes too:

                        http://www.ottolenghi.co.uk/blog/cate...

                        1. I made the salad last night with the French green beans, snow peas, hazelnuts and orange zest. it was very delicious and simple to make. The dressing was olive oil and walnut oil (it was what I had) and the orange zest added a nice bright flavor. I'll definitely be doing this again.

                           
                          14 Replies
                          1. re: Candy

                            It looks lovely - I have the cinnamon meringues in the oven, and hope to have time to make the pistachio rosewater ones as well, to take to a friends for dinner. My meringues did something odd though - they cracked and seeped early on .....

                            1. re: MMRuth

                              Was the oven a little too hot? That can make meringues weep a bit. I think I learned in college Foods and Nutrition class that adding a bit of cornstarch to the egg whites will help stop the cracking and weeping.

                              Tomorrow the orange polenta cake. i had to go to 4 stores to find Almond meal. It is just Bob's red Mill i don't know what the deal is with so many main stream stores not stocking it.

                              1. re: Candy

                                Thanks - that could be. My oven is so damned inconsistent, even with my using an oven thermometer. I'll try that cornstarch trick next time.

                                1. re: MMRuth

                                  I don't remember the exact proportions but it was not a lot. Good luck. Try low and slow with the meringues. Sometimes 175 F and patience is the way to go. I know you know about humidity and meringues so I won't bring that up. But low and slow can work well. Did you use super-fine sugar or regualr granulated? Super-fine dissolves better in the whites and is also less prone to weeping.

                                  1. re: Candy

                                    I did use superfine. I'll take some photos and post tomorrow.

                                2. re: Candy

                                  Other than finding almond meal in a store, the other problem is that sometimes it has been sitting in the store from a long time. In the past I have bought meal where the almond oil has gotten rancid and it tastes yucky!

                                  1. re: cpw

                                    cpw: I do know about rancid almond meal...double yuck!

                                    Luckily, we here in Oakland, CA have nearby Berkeley Bowl where they have freshly-made almond meal in a cooler. What luck to live nearby!

                                    Old nuts and their oil are among the worst tastes around. I once picked up a bag of pistachios I thought were recently purchased and used w/out looking at the date. Ewwwwwww! Now I try to be more aware of the sell by date.

                              2. re: Candy

                                I made this salad a little bit ago too. Rather underwhelming. I think there is hazelnut oil and then there is hazelnut oil. That's all I can come up with, because yes, I DID salt appropriately. And it just wasn't that bright and lively, to be honest.

                                1. re: linengirl

                                  You are so right about the nut oil. I remember spending an arm and a leg for a walnut oil a few years ago and it was tasteless.

                                  1. re: LulusMom

                                    I've had that happen too. The only nut oils I buy any more (that are commonly available in my area) are La Tourangelle.

                                    1. re: flourgirl

                                      Thanks for the tip. I'll look for that brand.

                                      1. re: flourgirl

                                        strangely, I have had great luck finding La Tourangelle nut oils at marshalls and tj maxx. I always check there before paying retail.

                                        1. re: smtucker

                                          Wow, I'd never have thought of looking at those places. Another good tip.

                                          1. re: LulusMom

                                            Always check their food, you'd be surprised what shows up.