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Pancake advice please

f
Fuffy Feb 23, 2009 06:00 AM

I'd like to make pancakes for 6 ahead of time but have no oven, only a microwave. Is this a ridiculous wish? Any ideas?

  1. roxlet Feb 23, 2009 06:16 AM

    I don't feel that this is a realistic plan. when I cook pancakes for a crowd, I put them on a rack in the oven to keep them from getting soggy while I cook the rest, and then I try to serve them as quickly as possible. Even so, the one's just off the griddle are always the best. I don't think that microwaving pancakes is going to give a tasty pancake.

    1 Reply
    1. re: roxlet
      greygarious Feb 23, 2009 06:28 AM

      I think reheating pancakes in the microwave is fine - they stay moister than those reheated in an oven. Unless you're talking latkes, in which case you must use the oven or they'll be a soggy, greasy lump.

    2. pepper_mil Feb 23, 2009 06:26 AM

      Do crepes instead.

      4 Replies
      1. re: pepper_mil
        f
        Fuffy Feb 23, 2009 12:54 PM

        Thanks very much everyone. What a lot of helpful suggestions - what is the difference between pancakes and crepes Pepper_mil ? Crepes would be fine if they work better than pancakes ahead. Do they? I was hoping to make them in the morning for dinner and now hope that procrastibaker's suggestion (below) of reheating (crepes) in buttered skillet might work.

        1. re: Fuffy
          p
          Procrastibaker Feb 23, 2009 03:58 PM

          I know pepper can answer this, but since I'm here I'll chime in. Crepes are thinner than pancakes and are usually filled rather than topped. They can be savory or sweet, depending. But they are a bit more fussy to make since they are extremely thin and delicate. You can make them with a crepe skillet or with any nonstick pan.

          1. re: Procrastibaker
            pepper_mil Feb 23, 2009 10:44 PM

            They are a little fussy to make, like Procrastibaker said, but worth a try.. You would make a big stack and wrap it, then heat the stack up in the stack in your microwave. You would need jam or other things to fill them.

            But seriously, just make the pancakes fresh at dinner. They don't take any longer to make than they do to heat up, and should be eaten very fresh and hot. We used to have pancakes for dinner regularly (family of seven pretty big eaters). Your only drawback is one person is on fry duty during the meal.

            1. re: pepper_mil
              f
              Fuffy Feb 25, 2009 02:41 AM

              Well, I made Crepes Suzettes from Julia Child (Mastering the Art Vol 1) just before people arrived and later warmed in large frying pan with the butter orange mixture. It worked very well and as it took me half an hour (my first time)I was glad not to be tucked away in the kitchen out of the conversation for that long. So thanks.

      2. Pia Feb 23, 2009 07:12 AM

        Do you have a toaster? That would work better than the microwave, if the pancakes are frozen first.

        1. kchurchill5 Feb 23, 2009 07:15 AM

          I'm sorry to me, they don't work. I've tried, they are ok, but to me ... pancakes are not that hard. Make them right before serving 4-5 minutes for 4 or so pancakes on a skillet or grill pan. Just stack in a aluminum or any casserole dish. I layer and just put parchment or goil in between. Set in the oven on the lowest temp. Can make 30 minutes ahead and turn out perfect. Micro is not good. Been there and even me who eats anything hated them.

          1. todao Feb 23, 2009 08:56 AM

            Some years back I did an annual Mother's Day pancake breakfast for a local group. The first few years the servers were moving fast and I was able to get nice fresh stacks of pancakes to order out of the kitchen (six foot by three foot grill) quickly enough to satisfy the guests. About three years into the annual event, one of the group's planning meetings ended with a decision to make the pancakes ahead of time and stack them in a large metal pan on a steam table. I resigned - so you know how I feel about making pancakes ahead of time.
            That said, I assume by "ahead of time" you mean to have them ready immediately after cooking but in quantities that don't require folks to wait for each batch to cook.
            Got a heating pad? You can warm up a heating pad, cover it with a towel, and stack your pancakes on that to keep them warm. I sometimes put a piece of parchment between each pancake to prevent them from sticking together, but that can make them a bit soft (due to steam) if they're kept in that environment too long. I put another towel over the top of the stack as it grows to hold the heat inside. You can arrange the first few side by side (depending on the size of your pancakes relative to the size of your heating pad) but you will eventually have to stack them if you're making more than you can spread out.
            I offer this as an idea for you to consider for the circumstances you have to deal with. It is not something I would personally endorse or use in my kitchen.
            If, by "ahead of time" you mean the day before. I can't help ya ...

            2 Replies
            1. re: todao
              kchurchill5 Feb 23, 2009 09:03 AM

              Agreed, before you serve, you can start a hour before, but a day ahead NO.
              Heating bad works great used it. parchment like i mentioned is great. That is not a great go ahead meal. You need to do that right before I think.

              1. re: todao
                chowser Feb 23, 2009 11:57 AM

                What did you think of the quality? I've never had good pancakes that were made ahead of time but have never seen that technique.

              2. jeniyo Feb 23, 2009 09:33 AM

                i can't have soggy pancakes and in my case, i rather not have them stacked or "kept warm while cooking" Pancakes are always eaten while it is being made in my family, so it is often enjoyed standing around, sitting on bar stools next to the griddle (we usually haul our own for family trips), in a rotational fashion. I think they are fairly easy to prepare and if you mix the dry ingredients ahead and have the egg and buttermilk handy it should be a no brainer.

                i'd suggest baking off some muffins or scones for breakfast and serving them with some nice butter and jam as an alternative- if pancake flipping is not something you'd entrust the group with. you can do a savory herb scone and microwave some eggs and cheese for a quick omlette sandwich instead... I think warming a muffin quickly in the microwave is more or less acceptable.

                1 Reply
                1. re: jeniyo
                  chowser Feb 23, 2009 11:56 AM

                  I agree. I don't even like pancakes after they've been sitting a few minutes when the rest of the family's get made. And microwaved pancakes are like microwaved bread--they get hard the minute they start cooling down.

                2. p
                  Procrastibaker Feb 23, 2009 11:26 AM

                  Why not quickly re-heat the pancakes in a lightly buttered skillet before serving? I realize this is a little more time consuming but this is a common technique when making crepes in advance and I don't see why it would work for pancakes, especially if you can have a couple of skillets going or a large griddle. In this case I think you'd be safe to make them the day before. You could always do a test run with a 1/2 batch...

                  1. alwayscooking Feb 23, 2009 11:35 AM

                    Make the pancakes, freeze them in a single layer, and reheat a stack of 3 pancakes in the mirco from 30 secs to 1 min.

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