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Fun with Foie Gras

dagoose Feb 20, 2009 09:57 AM

For my BF's 30th birthday I'm going to prepare him a foie gras tasting menu. I've already reserved the whole lobe and will pick it up the night before the dinner. The problem is I've got minimal time and want to make an amazing array of Foie themed dishes....soooo I'm hoping for some help. Let me know what you guys think.

Amuse: Foie gras dumplings: so far just thinking foie in a wanton wrapper, pan fried. I feel like it will need either something else in it or a bit of a sweetness in the sauce.

Appetizer: Salad of mixed greens garnished with sliced strawberries and seared foie, topped with good aged balsamic and the foie juice from searing

Main: I can't decide here. One of his favorite dishes is a foie burger with duck rilletes and braised shortribs. I don't have the time to make all that, though I do have some duck confit I could put on. I've never heard of any dishes with foie and a lot of spice, but if anyone can think of one, he loves spicy food.

Dessert: As much as I'd love to do foie ice cream, this is good foie and that is too much time. I was thinking maybe poached peach with vanilla ice cream and seared foie? Anything more creative out there?

  1. r
    RPMcMurphy Feb 20, 2009 10:55 AM

    I've had at, NY Bite Club, a Foie Gras "oreo" which I can describe as Foie in between 2 nutterbutter-ish but 10x better cookies.

    it was pretty awesome.

    1. b
      bigfellow Feb 20, 2009 11:00 AM

      I'm a fan of poutine with a nice piece of seared fois gras on top a la Martin Picard.

      1. Carrie 218 Feb 20, 2009 11:08 AM

        Cut the lobe in half and make a terrine the night before. That way you can serve it cold with toast points and a bit of sweet (membrillo or sauternes jelly).

        It will also break up the monotony of having nothing but seared foie course after course. And you are bound to have left-overs.

        If you haven't perused it, take a look at Ginor's Foie Gras cookbook -- it is brilliant: http://www.amazon.com/Foie-Gras-Passi...

        1. l
          Louise Feb 20, 2009 11:09 AM

          Perhaps a good Sauternes? The traditional accompaniment to foie gras.

          1. BobB Feb 20, 2009 11:16 AM

            Another nice amuse-bouche or canapé that I like to make is a slice of ficelle (like a baguette, but only about 1-1/2" in diameter), or a similarly-sized plain cracker, spread with about a teaspoon of cooked foie gras, topped with a toasted walnut half.

            1. l
              lnyc Feb 20, 2009 01:59 PM

              I recently received a can of foie gras from France, what can I do with that?

              3 Replies
              1. re: lnyc
                dagoose Feb 20, 2009 03:30 PM

                For canned foie gras, I'd look at making a terrine or pate, or trying it in something--originally I was thinking of Foie meatballs for the menu, but decided I would do that when I had lesser (canned or frozen) foie.

                1. re: dagoose
                  Carrie 218 Feb 21, 2009 07:15 AM

                  Most canned foie is already cooked -- essentially, it already *is* a terrine. Just open the can and spread on crackers or toast!

                  1. re: Carrie 218
                    BobB Feb 21, 2009 07:29 AM

                    Make that ALL canned foie gras. In fact I don't think there is any canned food product of any sort whatsoever that is raw. Cooking, either with heat or chemically (e.g., using an acid like vinegar), is part of the canning process.

              2. d
                dmd_kc Feb 20, 2009 08:23 PM

                All I can say is that I am imagining a lot of soda water and saltines the next day. I have sympathy bloating already.

                I know I'll be ridiculed, but with foie gras and bacon both, a little goes a very, very long way for me. A whole meal would wear me out! But it sounds like the two of you are going to have the time of your lives and you're already committed to the idea. Commitment is good.

                For the main, I think you should get bold and play against its very character. Sear it with a Mideastern spice crust and serve it with a simple couscous or cumin/garlic/parsley/lemon rice. You'll have enough unctuousness from your other presentations. Make the focus of that dish the contrast of hot (temperature and spice) and the fat. Though I have to say, a really awesome burger with a warm slice of foie could be killer. Maybe use a very lean meat like ostrich for the patty, to let it stand out against the foie? Maybe even make a smooshed stuffed meatball-type patty? You could use that Za'atar trick here. Yeah, a core of foie, inside a lean meat patty that's seared almost black with spices on the outside. I should have a Food Network show! But I'd need a catchphrase...

                For dessert, I'm at a loss. I have a very hard time imagining foie in an overtly sweet course. I'd think more along the lines of fruit and cheese.

                1 Reply
                1. re: dmd_kc
                  s
                  salsailsa Feb 21, 2009 12:28 PM

                  I have to agree about the fact that a little goes a long way, it is so good but so rich.

                  As for dessert, I like the combination of foie gras with apple or pear.

                2. m
                  mexivilla Feb 21, 2009 04:50 AM

                  Foie Gras Creme Brulee. Lots of recipes on Google.

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