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Toasted ravioli that isn't fried or breaded?

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Ever have a dish at a restaurant and think, "I could do that"? I'm on a quest to recreate an appetizer described on a menu as "fresh ravioli stuffed with cheese and chicken, deep fried, served with a basil pesto butter."

The pasta was crisp, not breaded, and didn't appear to have been deep fried. Wouldn't fried pasta look like a fried egg roll wrapper, with little bubbles all over? It looked like it had been baked, like when making a wonton crisp with sugar and cinnamon. It was smooth and the color was light and barely golden. The filling was superb. My best guess is marscapone and finely chopped roasted chicken. It was more cheese than chicken and creamy yet very thick (like Greek yogurt). The sauce was also delicious -- the raw garlic was evident, but not overwhelming. There weren't any nuts, and maybe not any cheese. The texture was super smooth, so either a ton of butter or cream. It was almost bright green with a clear basil flavor.

So what do you think? How would you go about recreating that dish? I'm thinking of starting by lightly brushing the pasta square with oil and then baking to try and recreate the color and texture.

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  1. If it said deep fried on the menu, it was. Deep fried can scare people away so you wouldn't say it if something were baked.
    Pasta and egg roll wrapper are 2 totally different things, which is why they don't look the same fried. It sounds like you mean was even and crispy and golden brown. I occasionally(as a naughty treat) make fried ravioli at home and they come out great if you just fry them. If the pasta seems wet at all or if you want extra crispy you can lightly toss them in corn starch shake off and then fry.
    Another option would be to use wontons skins for your wrapper and spray and bake.
    I don't know what was in the filling you ate but your take on it sounds great . Sauce could be as easy as sweating a clove of garlic in butter pulling it out and adding the basil. Was it creamy? Pureed?

    1. I make a pan sauted ravioli all the time, sweet savory and meat or cheese filled. I boil to cook and then pan saute in butter and herbs just a few minutes on each side. I gets a bit toasty, no breading and turns out un believable. Come back if you want any specific recipes. I have many. I could try my best to give you my re creation. I do that all the time.

      1. Many of my pan sauces are a brown butter which gives it a sweet flavor, and a toasty color, you can add herbs, shallots or garlic, It gives a nice brown color without being fried or breaded. You can always add a little cream or any other flavors depending on the filling. I would think marscapone, chicken, herbs, maybe shallots are a common filling I have seen, Sometimes raisins, nuts (but you said none), even some dried fruits or greens are common. Still finished in the butter sauce.

        1. Deep-fried ravs look just like you described - toasted and golden brown. They're fantastic.

          1. FYI, I use wontons, I like them better. You can do the same with ravioli too. Also, ravioli can be slightly flavored before being shaped and used.