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Cooking in a Dutch Oven

billieboy Jan 31, 2009 09:32 AM

I have just purchased Mollie Steven's "All About Braising" but have not yet received it.
Perhaps this question should be in the cookware category, but somehow I feel it is about cooking.
Perhaps the moderators will move it.
My question is do I need a cast iron dutch oven or will a stainless one work.
I will be using it in the oven, not on the stovetop so I don't think the heat retention of cast iron will matter much, but I am ready to be corrected.
Please don't advise me to get a le creuset© as my finances would not allow it.
A 6qt stainless with an aluminum bottom can be had for about $40.

  1. yayadave Feb 1, 2009 11:52 AM

    O by the way ~ here's the link to the threads from when this was a COTM. You might find info and tips about the recipes in the book on the threads.

    2 Replies
    1. re: yayadave
      paulj Feb 1, 2009 11:59 AM

      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/330177

      Does Stevens give any strong recommendations for one type of pot over another? A quick glance at reviews on Amazon suggests that she does not.

      1. re: paulj
        yayadave Feb 1, 2009 12:03 PM

        Oh, yeah. Lost my head there. http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/330177 Thanks, Paul.

    2. CindyJ Feb 1, 2009 06:43 AM

      If you've never used a cast iron Dutch (or French) oven for braising, you might well be happy with a pot made of another material. But this I can tell you: once you have used cast iron for your braising, you'll never want to use anything else. For me, there's something that goes beyond the pot when I use my LC French oven for a braise. I love the preparation; I love placing it in the oven, heavy as that filled pot is; I love removing it from the oven hours later; and I especially love removing the heavy lid and watching that *Puff* of steam escape. I know it sounds kind of nutzo, but I just wouldn't get the same satisfaction with a stainless pot. And I'm not even talking about the end result. It's NOT that stainless doesn't have a place in my kitchen, because it definitely does, but if ever a pot and a cooking technique were made for each other, it's cast iron and braising.

      BTW, Stevens' book is wonderful!

      2 Replies
      1. re: CindyJ
        billieboy Feb 1, 2009 01:16 PM

        Poet Laureate Charles Simic was once asked what it takes to be happy. He answered "For starters, learn to cook"
        Cindy, I think you are happy.
        You also have soul.

        1. re: billieboy
          CindyJ Feb 2, 2009 01:12 PM

          *SMILE* Thanks, billieboy! You might also say that many of the dishes I make are seasoned heavily with contentment.

      2. c oliver Feb 1, 2009 06:40 AM

        Let me toss this into the mix. The depth of the pot matters also. I recently did a 7# pork shoulder roast that was square-ish in shape and was too "tall" for both my Lodge and Staub pots. I had to actually put a large rock :) on it for the first couple of hours to get the lid to seat. After it reduced in size some, it was fine. So now I'm on the lookout for something deeper than 5". This is something I never considered.

        1. karmalaw Jan 31, 2009 10:06 PM

          if you are anywhere near a Macy's, check out their clearance section.. in the last few weeks I've purchased a 5.5 quart Martha Stewart Cast Iron Dutch Oven (non-enameled) for under $10 (a matching frying pan was $3 and change)

          Marshalls and TJ Maxx also yield great bargains: my 8 quart enameled cast iron chantal dutch oven was about $25 and a 5.5. quart enameled cast iron cazuela (close to a dutch oven) was $10.

          So shop well, and get the cast iron -- it makes a world of difference.

          1. yayadave Jan 31, 2009 01:54 PM

            You can get cast iron on line from Lodge http://www.lodgemfg.com/ or at hardware stores, camping or sporting goods stores. Finding them in the stores will give you a chance to see how heavy they are.

            Real Chowhounds won't mention this, but a nice, oval, inexpensive crock pot is a braising machine. You can do any necessary pre-cooking in whatever skillet you have.

            1 Reply
            1. re: yayadave
              greygarious Jan 31, 2009 02:49 PM

              True about the crockpot, but the Dutch oven is far more versatile - deep-frying and artisan breadbaking come to mind. Nice to have both, but if it came to picking one or the other, almost anyone would go for the Dutchie.

            2. j
              Jack_ Jan 31, 2009 12:21 PM

              Steven's ddiscusses this in great detail in the book. I use a Martha Stewart Collection from Macy's it was $45 with a coupon. Works just fine foir me

              4 Replies
              1. re: Jack_
                billieboy Jan 31, 2009 12:58 PM

                Of course!!! I should have waited until I got the book. She will likely answer my question.
                Thanks to all for taking the time.
                I would like the cast iron but hate to buy something I don't need.
                If it is as heavy as my CI skillet, I may not be able to lift the damned thing :)

                1. re: billieboy
                  p
                  pothead Jan 31, 2009 01:25 PM

                  This may just be me, but I swear that Dutch ovens, even big ones, are easier to lift than cast iron skillets. I can't deal with wrangling anything over a 9 inch cast iron skillet, but have no trouble with my 5 quart (presumably heavier) Dutch oven. Something about the way the weight is distributed, I guess?

                  1. re: pothead
                    greygarious Jan 31, 2009 02:43 PM

                    Pothead, you are correct. Dutch ovens have two handles (my favorite black cast iron one, a flea market find, has an additional basket-type handle), whereas your skillet probably has only one. As long as the skillet handle is not blazing hot, try grasping it so that the end of the handle farthest from the body of the skillet is resting under your forearm. This gives you better leverage.

                    Weight including contents is something to consider before purchasing an iron Dutch oven. You can get them in 7-8 quart capacity but unless you are feeding a very large family, a 5-6 qt makes more sense. And if you plan on storing it on a high shelf, you can cancel that gym membership!

                    1. re: greygarious
                      p
                      pothead Jan 31, 2009 08:08 PM

                      Hmmm . . . worth a try, I guess, but I have the same problem when I pick up two handled braisers in the store.

              2. ccbweb Jan 31, 2009 12:07 PM

                Go for the cast iron, it isn't just a matter of heat retention but also of more uniform heat transference and distribution. It's simply a better material for a dutch oven. Being thick and heavy is superior for long, slow cooking regardless of whether it's on the stove or in the oven. You'll also likely start at least some (and I'd bet many) of your dishes on the stove top before moving them to the oven and the iron will help there, too.

                As the previous posters have noted, you can find enameled dutch ovens that are pretty inexpensive (in the range you noted for the 6qt stainless pot).
                For example at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Heuck-33030-Por...

                Have fun with whatever you get!

                1. paulj Jan 31, 2009 10:42 AM

                  For most braising recipes any covered pot will work. It could be terracotta, cast iron, enameled iron, stainless, even Corning. If the lid fits well you will get less liquid loss. Some classic recipes add a ring of dough to help sealing the vapors. This is especially true in an oven, where the heat is already pretty even. Braising on a stove top might be better in a pot that absorbs a lot of heat from a low flame, and distributes it evenly across the bottom and up the sides. Terracotta and cast iron are probably better on the stove top than stainless steel because of their ability to work well with a low flame.

                  While long and slow is characteristic of most braising, many recipes can successfully adapted to a fast cooking in a pressure cooker.

                  There's yet another complication to this story. Some will argue that cooking in an open, or partially covered pot/pan in the oven allows you to cook at a lower, better temperature. When I take the lid off of a covered DO, the liquid is almost always bubbling. Leave it off for a bit (still in the oven), and bubbling slows due to heat loss via evaporation. I believe Harold McGee has an online article about this.

                  1. s
                    suzyb Jan 31, 2009 10:22 AM

                    I have fallen in love with my cast iron skillets and grill pan, so was excited to buy a dutch over (yes, this is what thrills me!). I went to the outlets to buy Le Cruset but they were still out of my price range. I wound up with an Emeril (!) cast iron dutch oven for $34 and it is great. I've braised short ribs and pork roasts in it and it's perfect. That was an outlet price but I bet online you could do as well.

                    1. greygarious Jan 31, 2009 09:46 AM

                      Get cast iron, enamel or not (the former is more versatile but an uncoated cast iron pan will, over years of use, absorb flavors from onions, garlic, and meat, and then impart them into foods cooked in the pot, creating a depth of flavor not otherwise achievable.) If you are gong to braise meat, you are indeed going to use the stovetop, to sear the meat before adding vegetables and liquid. You can braise entirely on the stovetop if you so desire, but you cannot braise entirely in the oven.

                      You absolutely do not need Le Creuset. You can get well-performing enameled Dutch Ovens online (e.g. Amazon), and at many retailers including Target and Walmart, for the same price as the stainless you are considering. The glaze on LeCreuset is more chip-resistant than less pricey versions but as long as you don't bang the pot around or drop it, the performance will be great. The cast iron will retain heat better, and the sides heat up as well as the bottom, so the food is cooked from all directions.

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