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Timothy's Chai Latte Recipe?

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yaddayadda Jan 27, 2009 11:29 AM

Any CHer out there have a recipe matching, or coming close to Timothy's Chai Latte? I know there are cloves (maybe cinnamon) ground in there, perhaps some cardamom, some vanilla extract, and other spices, ...but I'm guessing, and I have no clue as to quantities/ratios.

It's a rather nice, relaxing little beverage (esp. when some of the sugar is taken out of it) and worth trying at home. BTW, Timothy's World Coffee is a Canadian coffee chain.

TIA.

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  1. j
    jaykayen RE: yaddayadda Jan 27, 2009 12:09 PM

    IMO, the basics of masala chai are cardamom, peppercorns, and ginger. Without the ginger, you will never get that little burn in your throat, no matter how much spice you put in. If you have cloves, cinnamon, or any other "warm" spice, they can all go in. It's all very small amounts, like 1 clove, 1 or 2 peppercorns (depending on what you have,) 2 or 3 cardamom pods, a little grating of ginger.

    You'll sound so much cooler if you don't call it a chai latte.

    3 Replies
    1. re: jaykayen
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      yaddayadda RE: jaykayen Jan 27, 2009 01:13 PM

      Thanks Jay, I'm just going by their title. Cool factor is optional for a national chain, no?
      FYI, it's a latte because it's got milk within and froth on top.

      1. re: yaddayadda
        j
        jaykayen RE: yaddayadda Jan 27, 2009 05:32 PM

        Milk within is a given.

        Froth on top, ok, I'll give you that. ;) But chai macchiato might be more appropriate.

        Just the opinion of an Asian American who and can speak Hindi and Italian.

        Anyway, I've also found strong black tea to be better than delicate teas, to come through all that spice, milk, and sugar. (So go for the Assam, not Darjeeling.) Vanilla is not really traditional, and I don't think it needs vanilla to be good, but if you like it, go for it. You've got lots of time to taste it as it goes along, so "season to taste" is probably appropriate.

        1. re: jaykayen
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          yaddayadda RE: jaykayen Jan 28, 2009 09:33 AM

          Macchiato is closest, you're right. (Now showing deference to a higher authority.)
          I'll withhold vanilla from my experimentations. Thanks.

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      scunge RE: yaddayadda Jan 27, 2009 04:00 PM

      http://www.chai-tea.org/recipes.html I found this helpfull

      2 Replies
      1. re: scunge
        gdaerin RE: scunge Jan 27, 2009 09:05 PM

        Ooh I love chai! thanks for the link, I can't wait to try some of the recipes!

        1. re: scunge
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          yaddayadda RE: scunge Jan 28, 2009 09:33 AM

          Good site. You may be onto something.

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