HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >
Do you create unique foods?
TELL US

Roasted peppers and bacon bits...

Moimoi Jan 25, 2009 12:31 PM

As an experienced foodie and cook I occasionally need to ask what I feel is a "silly" question, here are two of them.

1. I love making roasted red pepper sauces, on their own or with chipotles, flavoured oils, etc. - they're an amazing accompaniment to add to almost any dish... so I'm wondering about those pretty yellow and orange bell peppers. I've never really used them, except for an occasional stir fry for colour. Can I also roast them and purée them like I do with red peppers, or is their flavour different? What about green??? No one seems to roast them and purée green ones for sauces. Any ideas or suggestions, other than antipasti for roasted green, yellow, orange???

2. I just bought a few packages of great bacon that was on sale, so I decided to crisply cook one package for toppings - e.g. caesar salads, potatoes, etc... What is the best way to store crispy, cooked "real" bacon bits? Freezer, fridge?? Should I additionally wrap them in an absorbing paper towel to keep the moisture balance??? How long can I store them?

Thank you in advance for your responses.

  1. p
    Plano Rose Jan 26, 2009 12:11 PM

    As to the bacon. Fry crisp. Crumble. Put in zip lock freezer bag. Freeze. Use as needed. We have crubled bacon in our freezer at all times.

    1. j
      janniecooks Jan 26, 2009 03:10 AM

      Re: green peppers, I personally don't like the taste of green peppers, whether roasted, fried or raw. They taste vaguely petroleum-like to me when raw, and IMO they don't hold the texture well when fried, and when roasted they're totally insipid.

      As for yellow and orange, I often combine them with red peppers in a saute, salad, etc. Wherever you use red peppers you can also add to the red or replace the red with yellow or orange.

      1. todao Jan 25, 2009 01:07 PM

        You certainly can prepare a roasted orange/yellow pepper sauce using those beautiful peppers you describe. The resulting sauce will , of course, be sweeter than your Chipotles sauces but you can embellish them with other spices or flavor enhancements if that pleases your sense of taste. I sometimes like to add other flavors to the puree (bacon is always nice) prior to straining the mix.
        If I were not intending to use the bacon bits within a four or five day period, I would freeze them in vacuum sealed freezer bags. I would expect them to last up to twelve months without deterioration of flavor. The "wrapping in paper towel to keep moisture balance" portion of your question has me baffled. Moisture within properly frozen foods should balance itself. If I have a problem with moisture migration within my frozen foods (e.g. freezer burn) I suspect the wraps I'm using aren't sufficiently "air tight" (not all plastic wrapping products are air tight enough to prevent some migration of moisture due to their microscopic porosity) and need to be limited to refrigerated food storage use.

        Show Hidden Posts