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Sad loss for the Minneapolis Food Community

j
Josh Resnik Jan 20, 2009 06:54 AM

I heard some sad news this morning. Tim Kordner, who sold his specialty melons at the Minneapolis Farmer's Market, passed away last weekend. His farm was called Brewery Creek, but it was also known as De Vine Melons. For regulars of the Minneapolis Farmer's Market Tim's delicious melons were as much a part of summer in Minneapolis as walks around a lake or ice cream at thelocal scoop shop. Tim was as well known for his bushy mustache and his sense of humor, as he was for his incredible commitment to artisan farming. In addition to over 40 varities of melons (from Conrad B to Marie Antoinette), Tim sold heirloom tomatoes and heirloom potatoes as well. I am not sure what will happen with his farm, but even if someone else keeps it going, the city has lost one of its real personalities at the market. We talk a lot about the importance of small farms and people who do things the right way, Tim was a perfect example of that.

Memorial services are being held Wednesday January 21 from 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. They will be held at Kolden Funeral Home in Belle Plaine at 219 N Willow St.

Attached is a link to a video from the Star Tribune web site where he discusses his craft. It gives you a real appreciation for specialty farmers.

http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/...

  1. rp1760 Jan 21, 2009 05:07 PM

    My thanks. also, for posting this news. I am at the Mpls. market almost weekly. I would always look forward to late July, sometimes late August, when Tim and gang would start selling their beautiful melons. On slower days he would see me coming, and bend down and start picking out melons for me. I always wanted two. One for same day, one for midweek. We were both strong minded. We would always meet halfway - he would give me one that I wanted, and make me try one he wanted.... Such a loss. Rest in peace, Tim.

    1. s
      soupkitten Jan 21, 2009 02:17 PM

      thanks for posting this. what a shame. i hope the farm continues under someone with even 1/10th of the passion and commitment of mr. kordner. they sold wonderful melons and squashes, and nice heirloom tomatoes and other specialty vegetables as well. small-scale farming of actual foods (that *people* consume) is one of the toughest occupations there is, and success is hard to come by. i hope others in his family will continue.

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