HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >

Need some advise on fondu

a
Alx72 Jan 19, 2009 10:21 AM

I want to suprise my wife with a nice romantic dinner. A while back she bought a fondue set and she really wants to use it, so I thougt I would suprise her tonight. I have never had fondue and don't know what cheeses to use. I know that everyone here rocks and when ever I am in a pinch I can come here and you guys bail me out. What kind of cheese can I use and what items do I get to dip? Thanks for all your help.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. c
    Cordsniper RE: Alx72 Jan 19, 2009 11:56 AM

    Trader joes has a pretty good cheese blend for fondue, its in the refrigerated section and comes in a box. I think its typically swiss and gruyere cheese with some white wine.

    1. p
      parisjetaime1 RE: Alx72 Jan 19, 2009 12:02 PM

      Try this swiss fondue. Its easy to make and soooo delicious :)
      http://www.howcast.com/videos/534-How...

      1 Reply
      1. re: parisjetaime1
        f
        FlyFish RE: parisjetaime1 Jan 20, 2009 05:53 AM

        That video is pretty much the classic recipe, and basically how we've done it for years. I find I like the consistency a bit better if I use 2 Tb. of flour. The purpose of the lemon juice is to raise the acidity to keep things from separating but most wines are already acidic enough so it can be omitted, as I usually do.

        One thing to be aware of is that most fondue "sets" sold in this country are really for beef fondue, so have a pretty aggressive heat source and a thin metal pot, the combination of which adds up to burnt cheese. What you want for cheese fondue is something more like the traditional ceramic caquelon, although most of the ones I've seen in use in Swiss restaurants recently are enameled cast iron. The Le Creuset shown in the video is a perfect substitute.

        We usually just dip bread, but cubes of ham can make a nice addition.

      2. Hughlipton RE: Alx72 Jan 19, 2009 12:10 PM

        The Cheese Store in Beverly Hills. They even have their own suggestions of combining cheeses (they throw in a little appenzeller) and they will shred it for you. You'll need a dry white wine which you will heat and then slowly stir in the cheese to which you have added some flour and then a shot or two of Kirschwasser (yeah get the good stuff). French bread cut inot cubes for dipping and since it is to be romantic Roderer Champagne from France if money is no issue or Anderson Valley, CA. for a really good quaff. Good luck.

        1 Reply
        1. re: Hughlipton
          Sooeygun RE: Hughlipton Jan 20, 2009 05:28 AM

          That's how we made cheese fondue at the German restaurant I worked at. Along with bread, you can serve lightly blanched veggies and slices of cooked sausage.

        2. t
          turqmut RE: Alx72 Jan 19, 2009 06:51 PM

          An easy way is just to thin melted Gruyere with cream.

          1. Emmmily RE: Alx72 Jan 20, 2009 05:57 AM

            The NY Times did a piece on fondue a while back. Here's the article; the sidebar on the left has links to recipes for a few variations.
            http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/23/din...

            1. j
              jcattles RE: Alx72 Jan 20, 2009 07:24 AM

              We like a smoked fontina fondue. I mince one shallot and saute in a small amount of olive oil. Then I add about 1 tbsp of champagne vinegar & 1 tbsp of white wine, let it reduce by half and add about 1/2 cup or so of chicken broth. I shred about 8 oz of smoked fontina and mix with a little cornstarch. Once the liquid is simmering, I start whisking in the cheese a little at a time waiting to add more until the cheese is melted. Once all the cheese is added, let it get bubbly and gooey and put in fondue pot. I serve with french bread, proscuitto, and sometimes asparagus or other veggies.
              This is a super easy recipe, my 10 year old makes it by herself.

              1. a
                Alshain RE: Alx72 Jan 20, 2009 09:28 AM

                If you never made fondue before, I'll just chime in to stress that it's far too easy to add too much cheese in the beginning (I'm making this mistake every time). Start with tablespoonfuls of grated cheese and have the patience to let it melt completely before adding the next.

                1. kchurchill5 RE: Alx72 Jan 20, 2009 09:39 AM

                  Gruyere, flour helps stabilize the cheese from seperating, a dark ale beer, a little onion make a great dip for fruits and cubes of bread. A good pumpernickle is great also a good dipper.

                  I don't know what type of set you have, if electric, you can use oil and actually cook your own meat or poulty. I prefer meat because it can be served medium rare and it is easier to cook. It is usually just canola oil. I use long bamboo skewers 1 a nice cube of beef and then serve a couple of sauces like a horshradish sauce or a soy and ginger sauce or even a mustard sauce. If not electric, stick to cheese dips and chocolate.

                  Chocolate, coffee with some amaretto is great served with all different fruits and a pound cake or angel food cake.

                  Also, swiss is good and fontina, all very similar. Cheddar is a much more oily cheese and I don't like to use for fondue.

                  Please contact me if you want any recipes. I have 4 or 5 I could give you.
                  kchurchill5@comcast.net

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: kchurchill5
                    Sooeygun RE: kchurchill5 Jan 20, 2009 10:34 AM

                    Growing up, the oil fondue was a big treat. We would fry hotdogs and dip them in plum sauce. Now I use broth instead of oil. Healthier and safer. I got kind of spooked about the oil fondue after there was an accident at the restaurant I worked at where it the handle broke and the oil got spilled on someone.

                  2. kchurchill5 RE: Alx72 Jan 20, 2009 09:49 AM

                    This is sort of my standard, but it changes accordingly to what I have around the kitchen
                    You can really be creative. The flour or cornstarch keeps the cheese from seperating, imp.

                    1/2 lb swiss and gruyere, or you can use white even a sharp cheddar but I don't like
                    cheddar as well. Also, fontina is great. Use what is easiest, it will turn out just fine.
                    All shredded
                    2 tablespoons flour or cornstarch
                    1 teaspoon worscestershire sauce
                    1 cup a good dark beer, even Amberbock will work, just not light beer, darker and a
                    better beer, better the sauce.
                    1 garlic clove, peeled, halved crosswise
                    1/2 teaspoon dry mustard, you can also use just a dijon which will work
                    With cheese sauces I enjoy a little nutmeg, just a pinch.

                    This makes the perfect fondu. It is my go to fondu. This was given to me by a chef in Germany and I swear by it.

                    Mix, heat and enjoy.

                    1 Reply
                    1. re: kchurchill5
                      s
                      smartie RE: kchurchill5 Jan 20, 2009 03:12 PM

                      here's my fondue

                      using the fondue pot, cut a clove of garlic in half and wipe round the pot with both sides of the cut garlic.
                      heat a cup of dry white wine, when almost boiling add....
                      half a pound of gruyere and half a pound of emmenthale grated tossed with a tablespoon of cornflour/cornstarch. Add the cheese a bit at a time until melted. When its all melted add a tablespoon of kirsch (should be available at any liquor store).

                      cube the bread earlier in the day so it is a little stale, but cover with a damp cloth
                      bring pot to table with burner ready.
                      Eat and enjoy.

                    Show Hidden Posts