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The Completely Addicting, Mouth-Watering Lamb Skewers of Feng Mao Mutton Kebab! [Review] w/ Pics!

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(Formatted with All Pictures here:
http://exilekiss.blogspot.com/2009/01...)

Lamb in all its incarnations has to be one of my favorite types of protein. Whenever I see Lamb on a menu, I tend to gravitate towards that dish, unless there happens to be Pork Belly or Grade A5 Wagyu. (^_~) So when Mr Taster spoke volumes about a new restaurant that specializes in Roasted Lamb Skewers, I knew I had to try it out as soon as possible.

Feng Mao Mutton Kebab is the newly opened restaurant by Owner Jing Cu Hwa, who runs the front of the house with her husband. They and the kitchen staff hail from Jilin Province, China, one of the most North-Eastern provinces that used to be part of Manchuria. They learned the recipes and preparation methods for all their dishes on the menu from their parents in the same village in Jilin, although their recipe for the Lamb Skewers hails from a traditional method from Beijing.

On my first visit, I managed to recruit my good friend Jotaru to come along and sample another potentially great restaurant. :) Feng Mao is a simple eatery, with tables adorned with disposable paper table mats and an open grill with lump charcoal used to cook the different skewers on the menu.

Each table is also adorned with a large basket filled with complementary, fresh, raw Garlic and Shallots, ready for the customer to roast over the open grill if they want to.

Whether it's because the owners are from Jilin Province (which borders North Korea), or the fact they're in Koreatown, Feng Mao serves up some Panchan (simple, side dishes usually part of various types of Korean cuisine), ranging from fresh Kimchi, to Pickled Cucumbers and Boiled Peanuts.

Our first two orders arrived within minutes of ordering: Their famous Yang Ruo Chuan (Mutton Kebab), and Ji Chi Chuan (Chicken Wing Kebab). We quickly threw both of these items onto the open grill, not realizing how fast they would cook.

Within seconds, the Lamb Fat from each Yang Ruo Chuan began to drip onto the open fire and cause flare-ups, which were entertaining and kept the dinner lively. (^_~) Our waitress quickly came over and showed us how to cook these Mutton Kebabs with such a hot temperature: She would keep them on the "lower tier" of the open grill for maybe ~5 - 10 seconds at a time, and then flip them over and keep them on the other side for 5 - 10 seconds as well, and repeat a few more times before moving them to the "upper tier" rack, to let them slowly cook the remaining amount of time (they were essentially done at this point).

And then the moment of truth: We each took a Yang Ruo Chuan (Mutton Kebab) and gently pulled off a piece of the Yang Ruo as well as some of the Roasted Lamb Fat.

Absolutely delicious! (^_^)

Each Lamb Skewer was already marinated with their proprietary blend of spices, led by the most prominent spice of Cumin and some light nuttiness from Sesame Seeds. Each bite of the succulent Lamb revealed a gorgeous fragrant aroma which was instantly hypnotic and mesmerizing, and far more complex than 818 Shao Kao (another Lamb Skewer Specialist in the San Gabriel Valley). I couldn't stop eating them. Simply outstanding! :)

By this time, the Ji Chi Chuan (Chicken Wing Kebabs) were ready. Unlike the Mutton Kebabs, these weren't marinated, so it was a rather straightforward Roasted Chicken Wing. However, when dabbed in the plate of their Feng Mao Spice Mixture (each diner is presented with a plate of this magical concoction) - made up of 20 different spices, with Cumin being the main ingredient - the Chicken Wings turned out to be another delicious hit.

Our next order arrived, ready to cook sometime while we were busy roasting the Chicken Wings: Yang Hsing Chuan (Mutton Heart Kebab). This was my first time trying out Mutton Heart in L.A., so I was curious and eager to see how this would taste. :)

While we had some assistance and guidance from the waitress for the Lamb Skewers earlier, for the Mutton Heart we tried cooking it on our own and this marked the first challenge with a restaurant like Feng Mao: Knowing when a particular type of Skewer is ready to eat.

The Mutton Heart wasn't marinated (like the Chicken Wings), and with our first time cooking Mutton Heart (and no temperature gauge or clock handy), with some negligence on our part, the Yang Hsing turned out to be well-done, probably a bit overcooked. It was chewy, but with a clean taste (nothing too gamy), like a more rubbery version of Sunagimo (Chicken Gizzard). Unfortunately, the Feng Mao Spice Mixture didn't save the Mutton Heart, but to be fair, next time we'll be more careful and try getting it to about Medium doneness.

Finally, we tried their basic Ji Ruo Chuan (Chicken Kebab). It was marinated in a basic Salt-base marinade, and like the Mutton Heart it was a challenge to figure out the correct timing for doneness. The first few Chicken Meat Skewers were well-done, and as a result, dried out. Looking past the level of doneness, they were really boring and salty.

Later on, we managed to get the Ji Ruo Chuan (Chicken Kebab) down to about Medium-Well doneness (just cooked through), so they were more moist than the first few we attempted, but it was still really salty and one-note. They didn't blend with the Cumin Spice Mixture at all.

Overall both Jotaru and I were quite impressed with Feng Mao, and I couldn't wait to bring more friends to try out other dishes, and to get more of their Lamb Skewers. :)

On my second visit to Feng Mao, as we stepped in, the restaurant was packed. We were lucky enough to get the last open table, and quickly perused the menu to see what else to order.

I, of course, had to order more of the Yang Ruo Chuan (Mutton Kebabs) for my other friends to try. :)

This time, I reflected back on the "intensive training" I had learned on my first visit and was able to cook up some nice Medium-to-Medium-Well Lamb Skewers. :) Like before, they were absolutely amazing, with the Cumin Spice Mixture and bits of Lamb Fat inbetween the delicious chunks of regular Mutton coming together to form perfection! :)

Next up was Yang Gan Chuan (Mutton Liver Kebab). I'm not a Liver fan, but we had one in our group who absolutely adores it, so we ordered some for the table. :)

I wasn't sure how good Lamb Liver would turn out, so I also threw on some of the fresh Garlic and Shallots (note: you reuse the empty Skewers and put on as much Garlic and Shallot as you want), in the hopes they would help with the flavors. (^_~)

Unfortunately, like before, the first few Mutton Liver Kebabs turned out to be overcooked. Each meat has different cooking times, and while I help out at various friends' BBQ parties from time-to-time, I'm not a grill master by any means. In a way, this was really like a Do-It-Yourself Yakitori / Kushiyaki experience. And in light of that, I gained an even greater respect for all the Yakitori Chefs out there. It takes some real skill to properly cook each type of meat or vegetable to the right doneness level without overcooking or undercooking it.

The Mutton Liver wasn't marinated, so what you got was a mouthful of pure, typical Liver flavor: It tasted just like the standard dry, mealy, metallic Liver taste that people love to hate. The Feng Mao Cumin Spice Mixture couldn't save this, either. (We later "perfected" our cooking of the Mutton Liver and got a few skewers to about Medium-to-Medium-Well doneness and it was still about the same, just slightly moister.)

While their #6 menu option - Bull's Penis - sounded... interesting, we decided to go with something a little more tame this time around :), Sohng Er Mushrooms (Soungi Mushroom).

The Sohng Er Mushrooms turned out to be wonderfully aromatic, woodsy and delicious! :)

Finally, we ordered some Ji Zhen Chuan (Chicken Gizzard Kebabs) to try our hands at making Chinese-style Sunagimo Yakitori. :)

The Ji Zhen Chuan were marinated in their Cumin Spice Mixture and we tried to be as careful as possible to not overcook these final few skewers.

Even with some focused effort, it wasn't as easy to gauge the doneness of the Gizzards compared to the Lamb Skewers. We ended up with a few at Well-Done, but with the rest at a Medium-Well.

Like the Chicken Wings, the Chicken Gizzard Kebabs took to the Feng Mao Cumin Mixture really nicely, and with some Roasted Garlic and Roasted Shallots, made for a good end to the meal. :) Overall, I still prefer a good Yakitori-ya's version of Chicken Gizzard, but this was a good alternative.

Service at Feng Mao is adequate, with Owner Jing and her husband helping out front, along with one other waitress (and no busboys). They're friendly and willing to help cook / instruct if you need it. Their Menu is oddly created, with some Skewers being sold only in batches, and some are sold only individually. Price per Skewer ranges from $1 - $6 (for the House Special Pollack), with most Skewers being in the $2 range. The rest of their Menu has more traditional, simple Northern Chinese dishes like Braised Fish with Brown Sauce, and Shredded Jelly Fish, with those dishes ranging from $4.99 - $19.99. We averaged about ~$18 per person (including tax and tip).

Overall, Feng Mao Mutton Kebab has quickly become *the* Specialist to visit when you're in the mood for glorious Roasted Lamb Skewers in the Beijing / Jilin Style. Mouth-watering, Cumin-infused bites of Yang Ruo with Roasted Lamb Fat make this place worth returning to again and again, but skip the other skewer dishes (besides the Chicken Wings and Chicken Gizzard).

The other types of skewers represent the biggest challenge and weakness for Feng Mao: How to impart the knowledge of how to properly cook each type of meat or vegetable over the close-proximity lump charcoal. Without experience or constant supervision by the staff, it's easy to find your skewers overcooked. While the customer "controls their own destiny" so to speak, it's still quite a challenge, and it proves just how talented master Yakitori chefs are at turning out meat that is moist and perfectly cooked through. Still, in the end, Feng Mao and their Yang Ruo Chuan (Mutton Kebabs) represent the best version of this dish in L.A., and that's something worth celebrating.

*** Rating: 7.7 (out of 10.0) ***
(Rating for their Mutton Kebab alone: 8.8 (out of 10.0))

Feng Mao Mutton Kebab
3901 W. Olympic Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90019
Tel: (323) 935-1099

Hours: 7 Days A Week, 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 a.m. Midnight

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Feng Mao Mutton Kebab
3901 W Olympic Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90019

 
 
 
 
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  1. Attaching more pics. For all remaining pictures please see Link in Original Post above. Thanks.

     
     
     
    1. Awesome post! This place sounds wonderful.

      1 Reply
      1. re: David Kahn

        Hi David Kahn,

        Thank you. :) Please report back if you end up going.

      2. damn... im so there...

        5 Replies
        1. re: Perceptor

          Hi Perceptor,

          I hope you enjoy the Lamb/Mutton. :) I look forward to your report back and your great pics as usual!

          1. re: exilekiss

            been to this place twice since Friday. an awesome find. we tried the mutton, the mutton liver and squab. even he liver hater in my party enjoyed the liver. it took us a while to get the hang of the cooking time too. the squab was the trickiest but delicious once we figured it out. we found the service very friendly and helpful. will definitely be going back. we need to keep places like this thriving in these hard times for restaurants.

            1. re: fkingford

              Hi fkingford,

              Thanks for the report back. Very nice! :) I have to try their Squab next time. Did the Squab end up taking the longest to cook out of all the meats you tried? And was it served as a half-bird, or was it in small chunks? Thanks.

              1. re: exilekiss

                You guessed it, the squab - half bird, not chunks - took the longest. Also, on our second visit they brought our order of liver not skewered but as a plateful of thin strips, more like liver sashimi. I was confused as to what they expected us to do; skewer them ourselves? Not something anybody in my party was too enthused about so we sent it back and they skewered them. The place was pretty empty though - early Sunday evening - so I really appreciate you spreading the word with your write-up and great pics. I've never gone wrong following your advice.

                1. re: fkingford

                  Hi fkingford,

                  Thanks. I'll have to try the Squab next time. :)

                  That's weird about the Liver Sashimi; it was definitely right to send it back and have them skewer it for you. :)

        2. Loved it! And it's not all mutton! But their kebabs are exactly as I have had all over northern and eastern china, with the hot pepper power. They cook quickly because they are surprisingly lean and mild.

          Not to be missed though: The Warm Noodle soup. A delicious red-pepper broth with silky corn noodles. I've never seen corn noodles in the US, and it makes a scrumptious and heart-warming dish.

          The Shredded Pork is a new twist on roast pork noodles. It looks like a standard noodle dish but in fact is shredded "julienned" vegetables, so has a little crunch along with the sauteed pork. Classic northern Chinese sauce.

          The Chinese sausage - very mild meat and rice slices, along with a spicy soy and scallion dipping sauce.

          If you like Korean rice cakes, these are the only handmade ones I've ever had in any restaurant.

          And the sides are really good: the cabbage side, cucumber salad, and radish salads - all kimchi-like but not your standard kimchi. The boiled peanuts are fun too.

          Overall, this is BY FAR the best Korean-Chinese place I've ever been. Not only is the food great, the style is unique. I don't know of another northern-Chinese/Korean restaurant anywhere, and that makes all the difference.

          Did not try, but am positive they are great: the mapo tofu, and the dumplings. We live in NY city but next time we visit LA this is our first stop!

          1 Reply
          1. re: cushymitch

            Hi cushymitch,

            Glad you enjoyed your meal at Feng Mao Mutton Kebab. :) They definitely have a standout product (I seriously can't stop thinking about it :).

            Thanks for the tip on their Korean Rice Cakes - we didn't get a chance to try it on our 3 visits; definitely something I'll try on my next visit. :)

          2. Chun Hua in front of Feng Mao Kebab House

             
            1. fwiw, i thought the matsudake - song RONG not song er (茸). tasty though.
              went twice in the last week.

              the quail and the lamb are tops.

              4 Replies
              1. re: Jerome

                Hi Jerome,

                Thanks for the correction (fixed on my blog)! :) (Sigh, that's what I get for trying to figure out the Mandarin pronunciation without the help of my SGV Hounds.)

                I'll have to try their Quail next time. Thanks.

                1. re: Jerome

                  It's not matsutake actually, it's eringi mushrooms. You'd be paying a hell of a lot more if they're serving matsutake. You're right, the lamb and quail are the tops, and I think the lamb heart is also really good, but the best accompaniment for all the protein is the shredded potato in chili sauce. It's similar to the shredded blanched potato dish you find in szechwan places, but this one adds a heap of cilantro, raw chilis, carrots, and the Korean red chili sauce for a nice tangy, spicy, and refreshing taste to cleanse the smokiness from the palate.

                  1. re: E Eto

                    Hi E Eto,

                    I'm glad you liked the Mutton Kebabs, thanks for your report on the place. Very nice on the Shredded Blanched Potato panchan. We never got that during our visits, but we noticed their small dishes alternating during our multiple visits. I hope they still have it when I go back; looking forward to it. :)

                    1. re: exilekiss

                      It's not a panchan. It's something you order from the menu. As for cooking the kababs, unless you have a large group, don't put on all the kababs on at once. It really is optimal to eat it when it's just done to a point just past medium rare with a nice char. The waiter tried to put all the kababs on the grill but I stopped him and told him we're eating at our pace. I've been on the grill station at restaurants in the past, so it's kind of fun to do that here. Just don't overcook the meat. Besides the chicken dishes, most everything else can (and should) be enjoyed around medium (or medium rare). Also, best to start the garlic/shallot skewers as soon as you have some open skewers. They're really best cooked on the top tier over the hottest part of the grill, after a minute or two on the low/hot part of the grill to get a little char. These need some time to allow them to steam inside the skins. The quail I cook this way as well. Keeping the quail on the low section will only produced a burnt quail.

                2. Wow, I am so trying this place. I should not be reading you amazing posts while at work, because they make me too hungry!!!

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: jonahlee

                    HI jonahlee,

                    Thanks. :) Please report back if you end up going; definitely get their Mutton Kebabs at the very least. :)