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Help! How to cook fresh rice noodles?

The Dairy Queen Dec 31, 2008 03:24 PM

Ack! So, I'm preparing my NYE meal out of Land of Plenty. I picked up some fresh noodles (rice flour, tapioca flour, water) at my Asian market today. But, I just realized, there are no cooking instructions! And Dunlop is no help, she says to prepare them according to the directions on the package.

I can wing it, but if someone knows what I'm supposed to do, I would appreciate some advice.

Thank you! And Happy New Year!

~TDQ

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  1. j
    jaykayen RE: The Dairy Queen Dec 31, 2008 03:41 PM

    Get a pot of gently boiling water and a wire strainer with a handle that you can lower into the water while still holding onto the handle, and a chopstick (or fork) for stirring.

    Load up the strainer with noodles (you may have to cut them.) Lower into boiling water, constantly stirring to make sure noodles get into the hot water. They should cook quickly...it's more like blanching than cooking pasta, no more than a minute, but probably much less. Just pull the strainer out and taste a noodle to check.

    If you don't have a strainer, you can dump them all in, but I would not take the water to a boil. Simmering is probably hot enough.

    6 Replies
    1. re: jaykayen
      The Dairy Queen RE: jaykayen Dec 31, 2008 03:44 PM

      Thank you so much! I'm glad I asked, because I can already see that what I was planning to do while "winging it" would have resulted in over-cooking them.

      WHEW! Chowhound to the rescue once again.

      ~TDQ

      1. re: The Dairy Queen
        j
        jaykayen RE: The Dairy Queen Dec 31, 2008 03:53 PM

        Well, those instructions are for rather thin noodles, which I just assumed you had. Is that what you have? Or are they udon sized?

        1. re: jaykayen
          The Dairy Queen RE: jaykayen Jan 1, 2009 12:56 AM

          Whoops---sorry, I didn't see your follow-up question. They were more udon sized. I followed your technique, except that it took longer than a minute. Maybe 3. I just kept tasting them to see if I thought they were done... They turned out pretty well, I thought. Thanks again for your help!

          ~TDQ

          1. re: The Dairy Queen
            Melanie Wong RE: The Dairy Queen Jan 1, 2009 12:45 PM

            I'm glad you were happy with the result, as I was worried when I read the thread this morning. FRESH rice noodles actually don't need cooking, they're already cooked. Just a swish through some hot water to heat them, otherwise you risk them getting too soft and losing their marvelous chewiness and firm bouncy texture. What did you consider "done"?

            1. re: Melanie Wong
              The Dairy Queen RE: Melanie Wong Jan 1, 2009 01:40 PM

              I kept tasting them and took them out when I thought they were just barely heated through because I figured they would continue to cook after I removed them; I feared they would get mushy and disintegrate. I think chewy, firm and bouncy is a good description of the texture.

              I did think I'd ruined them, though, because I let them sit for several minutes (there was a fish frying in oil crisis happening on my stove top at that moment) while I heated the sauce, and by then they had all stuck together in a giant lump. I was worried they were ruined, but I swished them in cold water until they unstuck, then threw them back in the pan with the sauce for 30 seconds or so to reheat them... Probably that was not the textbook way to deal with these noodles, but next time I'll know better! Next time, I'll probably get the sauce ready, then the noodles...

              ~TDQ

          2. re: jaykayen
            The Dairy Queen RE: jaykayen Jan 1, 2009 07:22 AM

            Here's a photo of the final product, dan dan noodles, FYI.

            http://www.chow.com/photos/263494

            ~TDQ

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