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Holiday Recipe Desecration

So a dear childhood friend loves a family cookie recipe very much. We make them ever Christmas and she always calls me in advance to er, remind me, how good they are. I always drop some off.

She has asked me for the recipe many times and I have given her the recipe many times. T

his year she decided to make them herself and took them to a party. "Oh this JudiAU's special family recipe." Well I went to party and tasted the cookies. Disgusting.

I finally managed to corner to ask her er, what she had done with the recipe I gave her. "Oh, I made it." "Hum I said, they don't really taste the same." "Sure they do."

The recipe has five ingredients: flour, butter, egg yolks, sour cream, and a package of yeast. She substituted crisco, non-fat sour cream, and added 2 T. artificial rum flavoring.

If she can't tell the difference between my delicious cookie and that horror I am not baking for her any more. ARGH.

My special recipe indeed.

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  1. Any chance you'd share this recipe with us. I promise not to substitute Crisco for butter. Cookies with yeast sounds interesting.

    4 Replies
    1. re: bnemes3343

      =) Sure.

      Hungarian Kifli

      Kifli

      4 c. flour
      1 pound butter
      4 egg yolks
      8 oz. sour cream
      1 package regular yeast, bloomed in a little hot water

      Cream butter and add yolks. Alternate flour with sour cream. Mix in yeast. Need ten times and chill overnight.

      Dough is supposed to be rolled out in powered sugar. This can be difficult as the sugar collects moisture. You may need to add some flour to the mixture to make it manageable. Keep the proportion of flour as low as possible because you start to loose the lovely crisp shell contributed by the sugar.

      Working with 1/4 of the dough at a time roll out 3/16 of an inch thick. Cut in 2x2 inch squares. Fill with prune, apricot, poppy fillings as Solo or raspberry jam. Don't let the dough get too soft. You may need to chill them for a few minutes before baking if the pan takes awhile to prepare. We bake on a silpat. Bake at 375 for about 10-12 minutes until light golden brown. Dust with powdered sugar.

      Note that the directions and baking time is aproximate. We don't have a copy of the original recipe any more. I've seen very similiar recipes online, usually with a nut filling, but they generally don't have the yeast. It provides a gentle lift.

      1. re: JudiAU

        Thank you so much. I promise not to desecrate it... I assume you use unsalted butter? I would most likely add a pinch of salt.

        1. re: JudiAU

          Wow, so these have a Hungarian heritage. You may recognize from my name that I am as well (Nemes). My dad came to the US from Hungary before WWII. I will probably give these a shot for the holidays.

          1. re: JudiAU

            How interesting that it uses yeast for leavening instead of baking powder or baking soda.

            I wish I could try them but I'm afraid I'm on a diet and butter, egg yolks + sour cream are *definitely* not on it! ;> I'd like to imagine them though.

            I'm imagining domed and tender. No doubt the sour cream provides flavor but could some lemon zest be added too? Would that be a desecration? Hope not. But, as it's only happening in my imagination, perhaps that wouldn't be too offensive. ;>

        2. That girl has no taste.
          I'd have been tempted to say, "that it isn't the recipe I gave you" and deny all ownership. Obviously, you're not going to bake for her again. After all, now she has her very own recipe....desecration.

          1. There's a special circle of Hell for people who desecrate recipes like that. ;-D

            My aunt -- who is a wonderful baker -- had that happen so often that she now prints the following on her recipes:

            You may substitute CoolWhip for whipped cream, margarine for butter, vanillin for real vanilla, and eggbeaters for eggs, or use a store-bought crust, or omit butter entirely... but if you do ANY of these things, don’t you DARE call it Aunt M’s recipe!

            1 Reply
            1. On the other hand, she could have said that these were made to the recipe you gave her and you deliberately didn't give her the right recipe just to make her look bad.

              1. I had a similar thing happen- only with funny results.

                I make cookies that look like mini cheeseburgers. It is not an original recipe.

                Vanilla wafers are the "bun" with a little melted honey spread on the top one, with sesame seeds sprinkled on it, a mint cookie is the "burger", the "cheese" is squares of an apricot fruit roll up, "tomatoes" and "pickles" are sliced red and green gumdrops, "lettuce" is coconut that is tinted green, and the "mayonnaise" is a dab of white icing.

                I've made them for pot luck events along with actual miniature cheeseburger sliders. I've brought platters of both at the the same time. Very fun and whimsical...

                A co-worker saw a photo of the cookies and asked for the recipe, which I gave her.

                She brought them to a recent party, and only used vanilla wafers, a chocolate mint, and a dab of red and green icing on the outside. No sesame seed buns, no lettuce, nothing else. They didn't have a trompe l'oeil effect, they looked just like what they were.

                When she uncovered them, people had to ask what they were, she told them hamburger cookies, then they got it, and oohed and ahhed over them like they were brilliant. She told them I gave her the recipe...

                While they were far from brilliant, it gave me a good laugh to see how differently someone could choose to interpret a recipe.

                1 Reply
                1. re: TrishUntrapped

                  My favorite is a recipe on another board for pork chops. Participants can rate the recipes. One person wrote a scathing review about how awful it was. She had substituted frozen cod for the fresh pork chops and baked it rather than sauteed.

                  O, gosh, what a shock