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Calphalon warranty - worth a try?

I recently moved to a new apartment, where I discovered that my oven and burners are way hotter than normal. i discovered this by searing a steak, and in the process I managed to scorch my favorite Calphalon saute pan so thoroughly that no amount of soaking and scrubbing will get it off. The pan is essentially unusable since everything sticks to the burned parts.
I called Calphalon for advice and was told to ship it in for the warranty guys to look at, but the lady on the phone sounded pretty dubious as to whether something like this would qualify for replacement. I'd rather not waste $20 and three weeks waiting to hear the verdict if it's going to be 'no', but I'd also rather not buy a new $200 pan. Anyone had an experience like this?

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  1. If you believe the pan to be a lost cause, I'd experiment with it. You can try Easy-Off oven cleaner, or you can try Carbon-Off (http://www.discoveryproducts.com/inde... ) which is made for cookware. It may take repeated applications...

    1 Reply
    1. re: Joe Blowe

      NO! NO! NO! If it is Calphalon anodized, Easy Off and the like will destroy the surface. Oven cleaner will pit and ruin any aluminum surface. They make their own Dormond cleaner and I have successfully used a paste of Comet and scrubbed with a Scotchbrite scrubber. Don't even think if using Dawn Power dissolver either. Baking soda and a long simmer may help.

    2. mordacity, here are some of my favorite home cures, and a lot of these are non-toxic (I don't know whether Bounce sheets are non-toxic, however:

      1. (My number one most successful of all time) Bring water and baking soda to a boil and then let it simmer in the pan for a good while. The scorched material flakes off. Sometimes it takes repeated applications. If it gets most, but not all of it, off, then go to step 2 or 3.

      2. After the process in #1, make a thick paste of the baking soda and a little H20 and scrub. You also try a cut lemon with a generous amout of baking soda as a scrubber.

      3. Alternatively, a paste of Kosher salt and the water.

      4. Then take a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser to it. Those things are amazing.

      5. Only recommending this for stainless steel; definitely not for reactive materials. Douse a few layers of paper towels in white vinegar. Be generous with the vinegar. Lay the toweling over the scorched on material and let it sit.

      6. I've never tried the following, but I've heard this tip several times. Place a Bounce dryer sheet in the pan, pour hot water over it, and let it sit overnight. Apparently, Bounce dryer sheets are like duct tape, and can be used to do, fix or build anything... ;-)

      1. My vote is to send it.The warranty the vast majority of what is sent.If is isn't replaced they ship it back promptly.I just sent a 4 qt sauce pan with lid.Priority mail was less than $10.00.

        1. Was this a nonstick pan? If so, you exceeded the manufacturer's cautions about temperature, no matter how unintentionally, and Calphalon should not be liable. Every holiday season, places like Bed, Bath, & Beyond sell two-packs of Calphalon nonstick pans, either an 8 and a 10, or a 10 and a 12inch, for $40-60. Even less with their ubiquitous coupons. No matter how careful we try to be, sooner or later we wind up ruining a nonstick pan. I buy the holiday special and keep the spare pans in a closet, ready for their time at bat!

          2 Replies
          1. re: greygarious

            As do I for the nonstick.Yet my warranty issue wasn't for nonstick.It was for a pan that was $140.00 almost ten years ago.
            mordacity's pan sounds to be a similar issue.I can't imagine a nonstick holding up to steak searing this long and then ?scorching.$200.00 sounds like it is worth a 50/50 try
            if not nonstick.

            1. I have been using calphalon nonstick since i bought a house with a flat glass range. I have sent back several pans in the last 9 years. Always a free replacement came after 3 weeks or so. Take a shot.

              1. Try spraying it with Dawn Power Greaser in the blue spray bottle. That stuff is AMAZING and unlike oven cleaner, there's no nasty smell.

                1. For stainless steel, I've been truly impressed by Bar Keeper's Friend (http://www.barkeepersfriend.com/). It's taken some nasty stuff off my stainless steel cookware. My roommate and I seared lamb at really high heat then baked it in the pan. She was in Culinary Arts who had asked her chef at the Marriot hotel what to do and he suggested heating tons of salt in there and giving it a really good rub. But we didn't get around to trying that because I did have Bar Keeper's friend which I bought on recommendation of someone else. It took it right off without too much crazy effort. When my boyfriend burned a pot of rice in my stainless steel pots, soaking it alone didn't do the trick. It did take several rounds of Bar Keeper's friend and soaking, but eventually I got it good as new again.

                  There's a Calphalon Culinary Centre (Toronto) here and they even stock the product there and recommend it. If it's non-stick, she suggested trying some Vim on it because it's very fine grit.

                  A bottle of Bar Keeper's Friend should be less than $5 so I'd try that before sending it in.

                  1. Like others have said, try using Bar Keeper's Friend or Bon Ami (easily found at any supermarket), follow its directions, and see if it works.

                    If not, Calphalon is very good about their warranty program. I've sent things in and they replace them promptly (within a month or so) and no hassles.