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Hooray for After-Holiday Grocery Shopping!

Today, I purchased a 12lb organic turkey for about six dollars! I always check out my local grocery stores for great deals on the day of/after holidays. In the Fresh Foods department of the Harris Teeter I work for, I found containers of whole berry cranberry sauce and turkey gravy for a nickel apiece, and a 2lb package of cornbread dressing for a buck. Finally, a 1lb package of haricot beurre for 99 cents completed my purchase! (I realized, once home, that I'd forgotten to get a can of chicken broth, the whole reason I'd left the house in the first place.) Does anyone else search for holiday bargains? What's your best find so far?

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  1. I haven't had a chance to grocery shop today but it is a family tradition to buy candy on the day after Halloween. I stock up on chocolate and use it for cookies later in the season.

    1. We decided to cash in today on sales and bought a chicken for roasting, green beans for a side and some veggies for the soup I'll be making from the chicken. We wanted a movie night but it took us two trips to the market to get the popcorn. We also picked up some eggnog ice cream. No huge deals, but after going to two separate T-day meals where I wasn't allowed or needed in a kitchen I had to make something at home.

      1 Reply
      1. re: TampaAurora

        A guy I work with used to work at a major Houston supermarket, Randall's, and he informed me that the absolute slowest day for them was the day after Thanksgiving.

      2. Nice haul! I popped over to the grocery after leaving the theatre yesterday because I wanted to catch the last day of 25 cent/pound sweet potatoes. I walked in and they were down to 10 cents per pound! I happily walked out with 10 pounds for $1 and tax!

        2 Replies
        1. re: almccasland

          To almccasland: If you don't already know this, let me share what I do with sweet potatoes when they're cheap at Thanksgiving. Boil in skins. Drain. Cool. Slip peelings off. Mash with wooden spoon or potato masher (they peel and mash very easily). Mix in a can of crushed pineapple. Freeze in dinner-size portions.

          1. re: Querencia

            Wow, thanks! I'm always up for something new and I like that it doesn't sound sickly sweet. With my first round, I roasted several of them until the sweet caramelization was oozing out of the skins, peeled the skin off to munch on, and mashed the innards to make bread. I'm going to look for a savory yeast bread recipe to go with some sort of Brazilian or Jamaican stew.

        2. Don't forget about those after holiday bargains from online sites too!
          Holiday baskets at 50-70% off, make for some lovely food love for the home cook!

          2 Replies
            1. re: jpmcd

              http://www.deandeluca.com/ViewProduct...

              One quick example is the sale going on at Dean & Deluca!

          1. We always shop for bargains. We were looking for a duck before Thanksgiving and the meat market mgr. told us to come back the following week and he would give us a great deal. We got duck for $.99 per lb. so we bought 3. Watch the food ads the weekend after Thanksgiving because there are a lot of wonderful bargains.

            1. i totally ODed on super-cheap asparagus all weekend ($2/large bunch). helped me get over totally *not* properly stocking my cellar with local brussels sprouts at the end of the season--i've already cooked and eaten them all. it's also very smart to stock up on all baking supplies/staples right after t-day-- lots of 2fer1's etc on flour, sugar, etc-- then you're set for all the rest of the winter holidays.

              1. Our after-holiday period isn't until after New Years', but best deal ever was a whole smoked turkey for $10 at Boucherie Hongroise (a wonderful butchers'/delicatessen on boulevard St-Laurent aka "The Main" which has received high praise on the Quebec board). We immediately cut it into manageable pieces and froze it. Later in the winter, it was a centrepiece for some wonderful Central European dinners, and of course the bones found their way into the soup pot.