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Rested turkey, soggy skin.

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So, we've all been indoctrinated into letting our turkeys rest, but the result is that the fabulous crispy skin goes all soggy and unappealing. Is there any way around that, or do you, as the cook, just need to grab a few bites before serving, and the heck with everyone else?

Is this a dilemma for anyone but me?

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  1. Never have a problem with soggy skin and let the turkey rest for a good 20-30 min. I cook my turkey at 400 degrees in a convection oven starting back side up. Usually roast a 12-13 lb turkey. After an hour, flip it over breast side up, baste every 20 min or so. Start checking after 2 hours, usually takes between 2 to 2 1/2 hours. I take out at 165, tent loosely with foil, let rest.

    1 Reply
    1. re: Diane in Bexley

      Really? When you let it rest, loosely tented in foil, the skin doesn't get soggy for you?

    2. You're probably not tenting as loosely as you should. Make a v-shaped and lightly place it over the top. That will retain the heat but allow the moisture to escape.

      2 Replies
      1. re: ecwashere7

        I agree, if you are sealing the turkey in any way during the rest, the skin will steam. By the way, you can encourage a crispy skin by sliding you fingers under between the meat and skin prior to cooking. Loosening the skin creates some air space. Also, putting a compound butter under the skin sort of deep frys it from the inside.

        1. re: sbp

          Just bizarre. I just fail when it comes to this. I swear I'm not sealing the turkey in, I give my turkeys the butter-under-the-skin rub-down, and still, the skin just goes all "blah" and seals itself to the breast.

          Epic fail.

      2. I rinse and dry the turkey and let it rest in the fridge for several hours to further dry out the skin. When I do this extra step (takes time, but worth the trouble,) tenting the bird loosely doesn't steam the skin.