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T Day line-up - what is everyone pouring?

We will be guests at a dinner for eight. The food will be traditional Thanksgiving favorites - Turkey, dressing, assorted sides. We have been assigned the task of bringing wines for the pre-dinner festivities / appetizers, and the white wines for dinner. Another couple has the task of bringing the dinner red wines and dessert wines.

So far we have settled on:

Pierre Peters Blanc de Blanc Champagne
Chalk Hill Chardonnay 2005 Sonoma County
Pine Ridge Chenin Blanc / Viogner Blend 2007
Keplinger Red Slope Grenache 2006

Of course, I reserve the right to change the line-up partially and / or completely before next Thursday.

Anyone else want to share their plans?

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  1. Without trying to sound TOO snobbish, it always depends upon who's coming to dinner, doesn't it? I've aways thought that what the world needed was a great $5 bottle of wine -- OK, $15, due to inflation -- something inexpensive for everyday and easy to open when Aunt Bertha and Uncle Seymour drop by, yet good enough for you to enjoy!

    My point being is that we're going over to my brother-in-law's house. He and his wife enjoy wine, but some members of the extended family . . . well, let's just say the contents of some glasses of wine disappear far too quickly, and with a certain regularity, that it doesn't necessarily matter if you are serving Pierre Peters (excellent choice!) or Andre . . . .

    So, while I'll no doubt bring some 2005 Morgon or Moulin-a-Vent, I will probably also pick up some 2007 Beaujolais Nouveau . . . if you catch my drift! ;^)

    1 Reply
    1. re: zin1953

      "So, while I'll no doubt bring some 2005 Morgon or Moulin-a-Vent, I will probably also pick up some 2007 Beaujolais Nouveau . . . if you catch my drift! ;^)"

      A favorite trick of Richard Nixon - who purportedly drank '61 Margaux (wrapped in a white cloth), while Whitehouse guests were served something less noble

    2. Bought a 1.5 liter of Frog's Leap Zin to have during the turkey phase of the day. After that, whatever people brought and/or whatever else sounds good to discerning palates.

      1. Whatever will help to get me through it.

        1 Reply
        1. I'm also a guest at a family potluck affair. Some drink wine, many beer, even more diet soda. In addition to my pies, Southern cornbread dressing, and veggie, I'll be bringing Joseph Drouhin Beaujolais Nouveau, and Mönchhof Estate Riesling. I'm saving the Pierre Peters for a quieter occasion!

          1 Reply
          1. re: vickib

            We will be drinking;
            NV R.H. Coutier Grand Cru
            N.V. Agrapart Rose
            2006 Chateau de Puligny-Montrachet Monthelie Rouge
            2005 Domaine de la Fontainerie Vouvray Sec
            Bual Madiera

          2. 1995 Cronin pinot noir Santa Cruz mountains
            And I haven't decided on the white. Right now it's either the 2007 Talley riesling, because I want to double check and make sure it's as good as it tasted in the tasting room before I continue proclaiming its greatness, or maybe a split of the 2006 Talley estate chardonnay or a funky white from Avanguardia, a Grass Valley winery doing some neat, interesting things.

            3 Replies
            1. re: SteveTimko

              oh, steve - tell me about the cronin and if you can find it in reno - i was planning on siduri, but i love a good pinot with turkey and am always looking for something new.

              1. re: nancyhudson

                The only places for sure that I know has Cronin in Reno is my wine locker and a friend's wine locker. We bought it from K&L Wines in San Francisco and they've long since sold out.
                Siduri is nice. Washoe Wine Co. has Dierberg and Stoller pinot noir that's good, plus they carry lots of Cru Beaujolais that might be different if you haven't tried it.

                1. re: nancyhudson

                  Nancy,

                  The late Duane Cronin produced many outstanding vintages of Santa Cruz Mountains Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, as well as sourcing grapes from as far afield as Sonoma and Monterey. They are worth seeking out, but like most Santa Cruz Mountain vintners, Duane "flew under the radar" and few people outside of the immediate region knew of his wines. (For every Ridge, there are a dozen or more very good-to-excellent producers with little or no name recognition.) As a result, when Duane passed away, there was a sizeable inventory of his wines left unsold, and K&L snapped up all (or a very significant amount) and had a great sale on these wines . . . .

                  Cheers,
                  Jason