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Kurdish Recipes

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schoenick Nov 16, 2008 01:07 PM

Hello,

I'm wondering if anyone out there has some recipes that they would share with me.I have a house guest that is Kurdish and I'd love to be able to make some things to remind him of home.

Thanks in advance

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  1. todao RE: schoenick Nov 16, 2008 07:55 PM

    I have no experience with Kurdish cooking but I found this recipe which looks to me to be easy enough to assemble and tasty:

    http://www.recipezaar.com/Kurdish-Chi...

    1. s
      Sam D. RE: schoenick Nov 17, 2008 01:37 AM

      This thread had the recipe for a soup called dowjic which is served at a Kurdish restaurant named Babani's in St. Paul, MN. I have made it several times and the soup was delicious. However, I can't vouch for the authenticity. I've never been to St. Paul or to Kurdistan.

      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/455118

      1 Reply
      1. re: Sam D.
        The Dairy Queen RE: Sam D. Nov 25, 2008 10:37 AM

        Babani's claims to be the first and only Kurdish restaurant in the U.S. Whether their claim is actually true, who knows. They don't have a website, so there's no menu online, but here's an old review from a local reviewer who names and describes some of the dishes, in case that faciliates your research at all... (as in, perhaps you might have good luck searching for specific recipes if you had more of an idea of names of dishes)

        http://www.citypages.com/1997-05-28/r...

        Good luck! Please do let us know how it turns out!

        ~TDQ

      2. BamiaWruz RE: schoenick Nov 17, 2008 08:52 AM

        I'm kurdish!!! Kurdish food is actually similar to iraqi food.. and because kurds are spread out and live in different countries often their food is similar to the country they're from (syrian kurds/iraqi kurds/persian kurds/turkish kurds..etc)

        Parda pilaw is a famous kurdish dish, it's basically a spiced rice (mostly cloves and allspice) with little bits of fried up meat, fats, and vegetables (potatoes, carrots) and then the rice is filled up in a nice pice of dough creating a mould.
        If you haven't made kurdish food before I don't know what to suggest. You could fry up some eggplant and make a casserole by adding pieces of potatoes, peppers, even meat paties and then bake in a tomato sauce. http://flickr.com/photos/adventuressh...

        Make sure to have flat bread with the meal, a good variety of pickles and olives, and rice. I'm sure he'll love what you make regardless.

        7 Replies
        1. re: BamiaWruz
          s
          schoenick RE: BamiaWruz Nov 21, 2008 12:59 PM

          Thanks BamiaWruz!!!

          I'm going to try the Parda Pilaw.

          Where might I find the flat bread you wrote about? Would a general grocery store have something like this or should I look at a specialty store?

          Thanks!

          1. re: schoenick
            BamiaWruz RE: schoenick Nov 24, 2008 02:34 PM

            Pita bread? Greek flat bread? Most flatbreads that we eat are prepared like the naan's in the fire ovens where the dough is stuck to the wall and cooks for only a few seconds, not easily found. So I'd go with a pita pocket bread as long as it's fresh.

            As for the parda, if you need more info let me know. basically you can boil chicken and then flake it, fry up little cubes of potatoes and carrots, and cook some long grain rice then spice it with some oil and allspice, and ground cloves and cinnamon, salt.
            Mix it all up and then line your small roundish pan with the pastry/dough and fill up the middle with the rice mixture, fold over the top (make sure the pastry is buttered so it cooks, you can use phyllo buttered layers until it's thick enough to hold, or make your own pastry dough, bake until the dough is cooked because rice is already done.

            1. re: schoenick
              MMRuth RE: schoenick Nov 24, 2008 03:49 PM

              I have an Iraqi Jewish cookbook with lots of Iraqi recipes. I'll look through it tomorrow and see if there are any particularly Kurdish recipes. Also, in general, my husband's sense, from doing business with a lot of Iraqis, is that they also enjoy Lebanese food. I wonder how close Kurdish cuisine is to Turkish.

              1. re: MMRuth
                r
                rockycat RE: MMRuth Nov 25, 2008 06:16 AM

                I have a few Iraqi cookbooks in Hebrew. Doing the translation is more than a bit of a pain but, from talking to the few Iraqi Jews I know, I suspect the recipes will be very familiar to your guest.

                1. re: rockycat
                  MMRuth RE: rockycat Nov 25, 2008 07:15 AM

                  I looked through my book and nothing was specifically flagged as Kurdish. There is a recipe for 'Iraqi Pita Bread' (Aish Tanure), which I'd be happy to post for the OP if interested. There is a dish called 'Eggplant with Meat' (Engreyee ab Lahm oo Gige) that sounds good, and lots of dumpling recipes. Also an interesting one called 'Rice, Garbanzo Beans, and Raisins' (Plow ab Hmas oo Kishmish).

                2. re: MMRuth
                  m
                  melly RE: MMRuth Dec 31, 2009 04:28 PM

                  What is the name of that cookbook Ruth??

                  1. re: melly
                    MMRuth RE: melly Dec 31, 2009 05:10 PM

                    Info here:

                    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/4235...

            2. k
              kchakanm RE: schoenick Dec 22, 2009 04:08 AM

              hi am akurdish girl and iam so glad to be amember of ur group and am not bad not good in cooking ,in the middle but am happy to send some recipes sorry for ma english.

              1. m
                melly RE: schoenick Dec 31, 2009 04:31 PM

                I found this http://www.herbivoracious.com/2008/04...

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