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Coffee Maker Recommendations

g
gttahaveit Oct 28, 2008 11:43 AM

My 18 year old old-school Braun is finally giving up the ghost. I've put off buying a new one for a couple of years now, choosing instead to put up with the not-white-anymore casing and the broken drip interrupter. But now that the plastic exterior has started to turn to powder, it's time for a new one.
I'd be more than happy to replace it with the same make and model, but thanks to all things being new and improved, that's not an option. I'm looking for something quite basic; I don't like multiple machines in one. I have a grinder, and it works fine, thanks very much. A timer, well perhaps, but I kinda like the freshness just filtered water, and newly ground beans. Was considering the Cuisinart, but I'm not crazy about the small pouring area for the water resevoir, and, I'm such a klutz in the morning, I'll just spill water all over the coffee grounds.
Any suggestions?

  1. s
    sobriquet Nov 8, 2008 02:56 AM

    If you want a regular coffee maker, take a look at Zojirushi. I'd go with the Technivorm others recommended, but the Zojirushi is cheaper and makes great coffee. It also uses a thermal carafe rather than a hot plate (a must).

    If you're a coffee junkie like me... consider getting a Chemex pot and/or a Bodum french press. Recently, though, I've been converted to the cult of the Bialetti Moka Express. No, it's not espresso, but it's a lot more satisfying than any drip coffee I've ever had. And at $25, it's a steal.

    1. m
      mpalmer6c Nov 6, 2008 08:04 PM

      From my recent experience, don't Buy a Black & Decker. Mine gave out after about six months. I now have a Krups thermal, which I love, but I don't know how long it will last.

      1. al b. darned Oct 30, 2008 03:11 AM

        Based on your description of your "needs" I recommend a Cuisinart DCC-100 Coffee Bar Classic 10-Cup Coffeemaker. We purchased this model last February from Amazon for $30 w/free shipping. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000...

        This is a simple to operate coffee maker with no clock to set or complicated controls to figure out. The cone filter design makes a great cup of coffee, the top opens wide for easy filling, the water gauge on the side shows water level in the tank, and the swing-out filter holder is easy to fill and empty. You don't even need to figure out that little red dial in the top...just turn it to "off" and use your usual amounts of coffee. The coffee brews hot and stays hot without turning bitter. In other words, it works like it is supposed to. Plus it has a 3 year warranty The best $30 we could have spent..

        1. jayt90 Oct 29, 2008 06:39 AM

          The best coffee for the least outlay has to be Aeropress, for $30-$35. It will make up to two mugs, and I have never had a spillage problem in a year of steady use.

          -----
          Merchants Of Green Coffee
          2 Matilda St, Toronto, ON M4M, CA

          Birds And Beans Cafe
          2413 Lake Shore Blvd W, Toronto, ON M8V 1C5, CA

          1 Reply
          1. re: jayt90
            BeaN Nov 6, 2008 04:48 PM

            I love my aeropress so much that I have one for work. The beauty of it is that it's small enough to travel with, and in moments I can have a fresh cup of coffee.

          2. j
            Jack_ Oct 29, 2008 04:59 AM

            For many years I had a Braun Aromaster 10 cup. I probably went through at least 3 of them over the years. Last year it finally gave up the ghost and I replaced it with a Braun Aroma Deluxe ($29.99 at J&R)

            1) The coffee is just as good as the Aromaster
            2) It takes up a bigger footprint on the counter top
            3) When putting water in, it is much more difficult to read the markings through the window on the side of the Aroma Deluxe than to read the markings on the back of the tank of the Aromaster. I find I have to move the Aroma Deluxe around on the counter to get the light just right so I can see it.
            4) The padded handle on the Aroma Deluxe is nice
            5) I much prefer the cylindrical carafe of the Aromaster to the conical carafe of the Aroma Deluxe. With the conical shape you have to tip the carafe more, and past horizontal, to pour the coffee out so you get better control with the Aromaster's cylindrical carafe though I immagine teh conical shape is better for loss by evaporation.
            6) I think the new Aroma Deluxe has auto off but I never tried it.
            7) the Aroma Deluxe has a built in Brita filter but comes with a blank if you don't want to use it (personally I put the coffee up the night before which gives the chlorine a chance to evaporate out over-night )

            1. g
              gttahaveit Oct 28, 2008 03:23 PM

              Thanks for all the info. I'd love to be able to try out the Technivorm, but my budget won't go much past Canadian Tire..
              I'll give the Cuisinart another look!

              1. p
                Pigurd Oct 28, 2008 12:35 PM

                I am looking for a new coffee maker for my parents as well, they seem paranoid about plastic stuff, so are there any coffee makers that dont use plastic? like metallic dripping thingies etc..?

                1. m
                  Mila Oct 28, 2008 12:14 PM

                  LOL, I was in the exactly same position about a year ago. Didn't want to let go of my ancient Braun and I know exactly what you mean about the small pour area of the Cuisuinart. I did succumb to the Cuisinart and usually set the timer in the evening to avoid morning messes. Makes a comparable cup of coffee to the Braun.

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: Mila
                    e
                    erly Oct 28, 2008 02:06 PM

                    I like the Black and Decker under the counter model, as it is low, and can sit on a shelf in the kitchen.
                    It has a separate water container, so no pouring is involved.
                    No spills.
                    Simply fill the container from the tap, and replace.
                    I loved the old glass model, but the new one is metal so I can no longer watch the coffee brewing.

                  2. c
                    canadianbeaver Oct 28, 2008 12:06 PM

                    We bought a Cuisinart, but the tiny kind, since we live in a condo with no space. It makes 4 cups or something. It hasn't let us down, and as long as you buy good coffee, you'll be fine.

                    1. grampart Oct 28, 2008 11:52 AM

                      I bought a Technivorm a few months ago and it is, by far, the best coffee maker on the market. In spite of the price, even Cook's Illustrated agreed. No bells, no whistles, just the only drip coffeemaker that delivers the water to the grounds at the proper temperature. I got mine from these folks.
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.techn...

                      2 Replies
                      1. re: grampart
                        scubadoo97 Oct 28, 2008 05:21 PM

                        The Technivorm got a thumbs up from Cooks Illustrated as their top pick

                        1. re: grampart
                          b
                          BillyBob Nov 5, 2008 04:29 AM

                          i too was seduced by the technivorm claims. We had good coffee, probably able to taste the difference versus other machines, but it just completely busted on us. Won't heat. While the high brewing temperature does produce a better taste, I am now searching for a good but less expensive model. I would never buy a Technivorm again. At $270, the engineering is just not worth it -

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