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Pasta w/ truffle oil. Wine pairing?

At the wine expo, I had pasta w/ truffle oil. Would this go with an oaky/buttery Chard?

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  1. I'd be tempted to pair this with a pinot noir, which often has earthy, mushroom-y characteristics that are an analog to same characteristics in truffles. Pinot is hard to find at budget prices, but O'Reilly's from the Willamette Valley is a good value for around $16 (and has fairly broad distribution; you could probably find a bottle in NY).

    Not so sure about pairing this dish with a buttery, oaky Chard. I'd be tempted to find a white that would cut through the richness of the truffle oil, something with good acidity along the lines of an albarino, a dry riesling, or a gewurztraminer. Mind you, I'm no expert on food-wine pairings, so I'm sure others on this board will have good insights to share with you. Good luck, and let us know which pairing works best.

    1. Hi,

      We just had some white truffle (early season) to pasta.

      People in Europe tend to enjoy it to the following wines:

      Reds: Rustic reds, like Barbera or Dolcetto.
      Whites: Arneis or bubbly Asti.

      We had it with a simple Silvaner (German, light) and it went very well indeed.

      1. Barolo.

        An aged one would be my preference.

        2 Replies
        1. re: RCC

          Yup. Forgot that one. Absolutely spot-on.

          1. re: RCC

            I like a Barolo here.

            OP, you seem really interested in pairing food with buttery, oaky Chard. Besides lobster with butter, there's not a ton a big, CA Chard is going to go with. They're really not the best food wines (lower acid, over the top flavor profile).

            One of the better CA Chards for food pairing I've had recently is the Sonoma Cutrer Les Pierres but it's sun-kissed minerality is surely not what the OP is looking for.

            1. I would pair a pasta with truffle oil with a dry white wine from Trentino Alto Adige.

              Or Champagne.

              Or a *good* Prosecco where the bubbles aren't too big.