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Poultry specialists in Paris?

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  • hamha Oct 9, 2008 02:15 AM
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In a few weeks, I am going to Paris with a few gastronaut friends.

As Norway (our home country) is known for poor quality poultry, we discussed the opportunity of a theme dinner.

Does this kind of place exists at all, or is some quality place especially known for their poultry specialities?

I need a few bistro recommendations, and one high-level recommendation.

It would be great if someone could help me out!

Cheers,

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  1. I am not aware of a poultry dedicated restaurant, but good poultry is a basic of every good restaurant in here. Especially for birds cooked whole yet, perfect cooking is as hard to find as anywhere else. In the high end corner, some hits include the poached poularde in a bladder at le Bristol, the roasted Chicken at l'Ambroisie (190€ for two, enjoy -- much more when with truffles), the canard au sang at Rostang (better than at la Tour d'Argent imo but without the view), the pigeon André Malraux at Lasserre. As for everything, you can also trust the ûber excellent Briffard at le Cinq (he does a famous pithivier, which is a game pie of birds -- extraordinary). Last but not least, Alain Passard does extraordinary poultry, duck or chicken, poached, grilled or cooked in salt depending on the day (extraordinarily expensive as well).

    Back in the days no one beat Benoit Guichard's whole roasted birds at Jamin, but the restaurant does not exist anymore (sigh).

    The most renowned and violently expensive roast chicken is l'Ami Louis. It's really good and really expensive.

    Among rotisserie, the only one I recommend is La Rotisserie du Beaujolais (La Tour d'Argent's bistrot). You need to plan what you want, call shortly before you go and they will start the cooking appropriately. Other places (L'Atelier Maitre Albert, le Père Claude) will serve you whatever is on the rack, and it is rarely well cooked.

    Among bistronomiques, Chez Michel often makes a very rare breed of chicken called Coucou de Rennes. He's good at cooking poultry. La Régalade is also extraordinary with it. I have no Chez l'Ami Jean poultry experience, unless you count the whole foie gras roasted for two (which I heartily recommend).

    L'Auberge Bressane does a particularly good and traditional "poulet au vin jaune et aux morilles". Guy Savoy's la Butte Chaillot is not a good restaurant but has the one good dish of roast chicken.

    Christian Constant, the chef, wrote a whole book on the topic of poultry ("La Volaille de Christian Constant"). I'm sure he'll be happy to throw you a thematic dinner at mid range prices (Le Violon d'Ingres) if you warn him in advance.

    Maybe you'd like to see poultry shops? They are becoming a rarity and the clear leader in town is Le Coq Saint Honoré. Desnoyer has nice poultry too, but he's a butcher.

    A lot of butchers also roast chicken and you can buy them roasted to take home or even eat on a bench in a park. Few are really good. I would single out the ones from Maison Divay, rue Bayen and Christian Constant the patissier rue Fleurus, though I'm sure there are other good ones.

    It is a fascinating topic. Feel free to contact me directly if you need help organizing your foodie stay (zejulot@gmail.com).

    2 Replies
    1. re: souphie

      Why do you have to order in advance at La Rotisserie Du Beaujolais? We were thinking of going next Saturday Night. First time in Paris...Auberge du Jarente for first night Thursday and Saturday was our only other plan for the seven nights.

      1. re: NancyinNJ

        You only have to order in advance (30') if you want a chicken or a lamb shoulder. Because then they put YOUR piece in the rotisserie and they serve it to you when it is perfect. In other rotisseries, random chicken or other pieces are roasting slowly until someone comes to take them -- they'll never take the undercooked ones, but most of the time, you'll have a dry and sad piece of meat/poultry with the only benefit of possibly having crispy skin and tasty juice on the side.