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NY FOODIE IN SEATTLE FOR 2 MEALS

Need some help-

Where are the 2 places I must eat at-
Few notes:

Money is no object
Mostly want seafood
I am with 2 people that do not eat meat

Here are a few places I looked at let me know if I missed any or if you can narrow it down
to 2 dinners and maybe a lunch/brunch

Thx in advance

Seafood:
http://www.rays.com
http://flyingfishrestaurant.com
http://www.tomdouglas.com
http://www.fishclubseattle.com

Pan-Asian:
http://www.wildginger.net/menus.html

New American:
http://www.canlis.com
http://www.theherbfarm.com (expensive, but famously outrageous
)http://unionseattle.com/
http://www.chefjasonwilson.com/crush....
http://www.chezshea.com/index.php

Japanese:
http://www.umisakehouse.com/
http://www.nishinorestaurant.com
http://wann-izakaya.com
http://www.chisoseattle.com/chiso/ind...

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  1. Seafood: Matt's (for the less adventuress: Ray's or Chinook's)
    Pan Asian: Monsoon, definitely
    New American: Tilth or Lark or Stumbling Goat

    2 Replies
    1. re: mrnelso

      I second Matt's and the Stumbling Goat. For sushi, I love Nishino and Chiso. Canlis is wonderful for the view and service, I know it has people on this board who don't care for it, but the service and wine list is top notch.

      1. re: mrnelso

        I second Lark on New American or if you don't mind taking a trip to Kirkland, try Cafe Junita

        Pan Asian: Green Leaf (Vietnamese)
        I love the Umi sake house and Nishino as well. Both would be great choices

      2. For Japanese, Umi is nice although Mashiko in West Seattle is truly fantastic. It's kind of small, so if you're going on a tight schedule you might want to call in for reservations.
        http://www.sushiwhore.com/

        I've heard amazing things about Canlis. That might be worth a look. I'll be going at some point.

        Last weekend I had some excellent salmon at Il Terrazzo Carmine, and my boyfriend had some phenomenal cioppino. It's hidden on first avenue so if you're interested in going, then look for the black awnings on the side of the street closest to the waterfront, or give them a call to confirm where they are. It's between Jackson and King.
        http://ilterrazzocarmine.com/

        Good luck!

        1. I have many NYC friends who visit here and I, myself,travel there often....this is a tough town for finding restaurants to satisfy a NYer, IMO,....I take my NYC eaters to:
          VEIL
          CANLIS (view, too)
          NELL'S (view, too)
          You can go to their websites and check out their menus.....the quality of the food, libations, artistry, ambiance and service, will not disappoint.

          1. I'm an ex-NY'er and frequent visitor. Matt's in the Market should definitely be added to your list and be one of your two dinners, IMO.

            I think Nishino would be a great contast for the 2nd dinner assuming everyone in the party enjoys sushi. If not, my personal choice would be Dahlia Lounge for the 2nd dinner.

            1. For Japanese- I like Nishino for a flavorful meal out and I stop in at Umi often on late nights or happy hour.
              For New American- I have heard that The Herb Farm has changed since the Head Chef left and opened Poppy this month (it is a new style of dining in Seattle- with a vegetarian offering as well). Tilth is not a favorite of mine. I have heard good things about Union.

              For Lunch/Brunch- Matt's in the Market for Northwest food(catfish sandwich is amazing) or Etta's for a Tom Douglas seafood experience.

              Others mentioned- I like Ray's- it is a Seattle icon. Veil would be a positively good choice. Tom Douglas' Palace Kitchen would be a good choice as well.

              1. Relative to their NY counterparts:

                Quinn's is almost a direct rip off of The Spotted Pig.
                Chiso Kappo is 1/3 as good as Masa at 1/6 the price.
                Veil is doing food as good as Jean Georges.
                Neil Robertson at Canlis is the best pastry chef this side of the Mississippi. Think Sam Mason without the MG bent.

                On the cocktail front:
                Liberty features prohibition era cocktails ala Pegu Club.
                Original drinks in the vain of PDT can be found at Spur.

                For dinner, I'd hit:
                seafood - Veil
                pan-asian - Monsoon (Wild Ginger is crap!)
                new amercian - Union for dinner, Canlis for dessert
                Japanese - Chiso Kappo

                But that's me.

                BTW, you will not find high-end service even CLOSE to NYC. Canlis tries the hardest, but the culture is just different out here. Lower your expectations and you won't be disappointed.

                1. Matt's should be your seafood choice though if your friends don't eat any meat, including seafood, their choices are very limited there.

                  For new American, Lark or Union. Canlis is a nice experience but not the best food in town by any stretch. Herbfarm has had a chef change are reports are very mixed.

                  1. I'm a NY expat living in Seattle since 2005 and I would not bother with Japanese food if I were just visiting Seattle. You can get much better in NYC without trying. In your shoes I would get Vietnamese food instead if I weren't burdened with vegetarians.

                    Forget Canlis, Herbfarm. Expensive yawn factories. (great views at Canlis, admittedly.) Wild Ginger is a waste of a meal.

                    Matt's in the Market & Dahlia Lounge are great suggestions. Matt's is no good if you've got real vegetarians as opposed to pescetarians, but Dahlia Lounge has some outstanding vegetarian dishes. I have enjoyed several and I'm far from a vegetarian - I am drawn inexorably to their morel tamales whenever they appear on the menu. They also do an impeccable job with seafood.

                    1. Skip the Tom Douglas chain. Very uninspiring. Crush too.

                      Lark is phenomenal. Veil is also great.

                      1. The two places i would do dinner are Crush, followed by Crush the next night. I was there recently and a couple who were chefs from Montreal did exactly that. A notch above Veil imo and 2 notches above Lark. (I spent 4yrs eating out in NYC and this is the only place that comes close, imo)

                        1. i am a New Yorker too, but i go to Seattle frequently because my best friend lives there...

                          1) Lark...my favorite restaurant in Seattle, possibly my fav in the United States...better than any New American bistro in NYC, hands down...

                          2) Harvest Vine...not sure if there are enough seafood options here, but it's a fantastic Basque tapas place, and also ridiculously better than any tapas in NYC...

                          3) Matt's...always a solid choice...

                          I've never been to Nishino, though i've heard good things...i didn't care for Chiso much at all...and my last visit Shiro's was disappoiting too...overall, i'd say NYC has much better Japanese food in all categories (sushi, izakaya, ramen, soba, etc)...

                          Flying Fish is a well-run place, though i think of it more as somewhere to grab a late-night snack than for a special meal, but that's just me...

                          Wild Ginger is fun and well-run too, and i enjoyed my one meal there even i usually steer clear of any place that bills itself as pan-asian...

                          1. I would say either Matt's or Rays - I love them both. Pass on Fish Club, Wild Ginger. Then either Union or Nishino's.

                            I was at Union last Saturday. They now have a 4 course meal for $50 -- we all got different dishes and tried everything. It was great. The hamachi appetizer was the best I have ever had. Other standouts were the rabbit ravaoli and the gnocchi with oxtail.

                            1. Nishino is my favorite sushi place in Seattle, with best atmosphere. The white salmon sashimi (isn't always listed on the menu) is amazing, as is toro sashimi (like butter). The omakase chef tasting meal is excellent, but should be requested when making reservations.

                              Wild Ginger is overrated--but they do good pan-Asian (service not good enough)

                              Rays is a Seattle institution--good for seafood.

                              Canlis--Seattle institution, excellent quality and service, not innovative

                              Union--excellent, small plates

                              Harvest Vine--tapas/spanish/wonderful

                              2 Replies
                              1. re: Jeanhea

                                i went to Ray's a few years ago w/ a group of four...while there was nothing wrong with the meal or the service, i didn't really understand why the place was so well known...it was pleasant: but there wasn't anything particularly memorable about the food or the atmosphere and it seemed comparable to hundreds of very solid seafood places in coastal cities all over America (e.g. Maine, SF, Chesepeake, etc)...

                                Not knocking it...if i lived in Seattle, i imagine i might go back at some point...but i'd say if one had limited time in the city, Matt's might be a more memorable choice...

                                1. re: Simon

                                  Stumbling Goat fo sho' and I'm not just saying that because it's in my 'hood.