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How to eat a pomegranate?

a
Al_Pal Oct 6, 2008 10:04 PM

Can someone tell me how I'm supposed to eat this thing? I love pomegranate, but I've never had great luck eating them. Mostly I just end up making a huge mess with the seeds and getting some sort of permanent pomegranate stain on my clothing. And I've heard of about three different "right" ways to eat one. I didn't think you were supposed to eat the flesh part, but I met someone who has. I thought the proper way was to just cut it open, scoop the seeds out, and eat them, but then I heard that you're just supposed to eat the fruity part from around the seed and then spit the seed out. Also, what is pomegranate good with? I can't think of anything (save for maybe a salad) that would go well with it.

  1. mnosyne Oct 6, 2008 10:22 PM

    Naked, in the bathtub!

    1. ipsedixit Oct 6, 2008 10:27 PM

      I extract the seeds from the rind and just eat away.

      You can also extract the juice.

      As to what to eat it with? I like to mix it with yogurt sometimes, also goes well as a topping on pudding.

      1. n
        nemo Oct 6, 2008 11:34 PM

        Alton Brown had a show on pomegranates. Check it out for some ideas.
        http://www.foodnetwork.com/good-eats/...

        I like Nigela Lawson's extraction method of cutting in half, spanking on the skin side with a wooden spoon and the seeds fly out. Most people eat the entire -- what is that little juicy thing called? I'm sure AB knows the name.

        In that episode, he also shows how to make pomegranate molasses (or syrup), but for $2.50 I can buy a bottle at my local middle eastern grocery store. I've only used it so far by drizzling on yoghurt, but a friend made a pom martini and said it was great. There was a thread on this subject on CH not too long ago.

        1. Chris VR Oct 7, 2008 05:33 AM

          The least messy way I've found to extract the seeds is to do it submerged in a bowl of water. The juice doesn't go everywhere. The seeds sink and the pith and skin float, so you just scoop them out, drain the bowl and all you have left are the seeds.

          1. jen kalb Oct 7, 2008 06:20 AM

            you can open these similarly to an orange. take off the top part (blossom end) with a paring knife, creating a bit of an indentation in the hard white flesh so that you can get purchase with your fingers (without cutting into the cells to the extent possible) , then score the skin of the fruit top to bottom creating a few sections. You can then , holding the fruit in both hands, easily lever the thing open with your thumbs putting them into the indentation you have created - it can be broken into usable sections along the lines you have scored, with virtually no escape of juice.

            1. t
              tmso Oct 7, 2008 08:55 AM

              Pomegranate and shark or dogfish is a match made in heaven.

              Or maybe in hell -- I don't eat shark anymore after realizing just how much mercury they have in them.

              1 Reply
              1. re: tmso
                Whosyerkitty Oct 7, 2008 09:04 AM

                Okay, when I was little, my mom used to make us eat them on the porch, but I always just cut them in sections, eat them and spit out the seeds. Now I sometimes just do it all over a big bowl

              2. todao Oct 7, 2008 09:28 AM

                Here's the way I've done it for many years. I'm not a fan of pomegranate but my wife love 'em - which means I use them whenever I feel compelled to make her happy:

                http://seniorjournal.com/NEWS/Nutriti...

                1. jen kalb Oct 7, 2008 09:39 AM

                  I mentioned a method of opening and eating these at the table as a fruit (like for dessert) which works fine for us below and doesnt involve either water or cutting into the pomegranate. They are beautiful and delicious on their own.We eat the cells, obviously not the white pith. You dont have to remove or spit out the seed itself, they are softer than grape seeds and we just swallow them, but some people might not like that. We havent progressed to using them in cooking except adding as a garnish in middle eastern salads - and a friend of ours makes a fantastic Thanksgiving salad that involves a lot of these with ginger,celery,mushrooms, nuts, water chestnuts, wild rice and other good things.

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