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Any ideas on what to do with Pork?

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I have received some ground pork onion burgers, ground pork and fresh pork patties, as a gift. I rarely cook with pork. Any idea's on what I can make with these?
And, will the fresh pork patties be uncured and not seasoned? Thank you, I'm new at this and I don't want it to go to waste!

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  1. Not sure how or from where you received these as a gift, so cannot quite answer if they will "be uncured and not seasoned".

    You can freeze and thaw at your convenience.

    I would BBQ the patties and use as pork hamburgers.

    I would season the ground pork for either breakfast sausage meat or Italian sausage meat then freeze or I would mix it with chopped, boiled potatoes, water, and put in a meat pie, or I would season with 'creton' seasonings, cook for a few hours with a bit of water, cool as a spread (not true creton, but a nice facsimile), or I would stirfry with chinese blackbeans, broth, oyster sauce, egg, and add shrimp for a chinese dish.

    But thats me.

    1 Reply
    1. re: porker

      Mix the ground pork with beef and veal for a really good meatloaf.

      Pork patties -- breakfast, no question!

      Pork burgers -- yum, BBQ.

    2. http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

      ^Kebabs were the first thing to come to mind. You can adjust the seasonings however you like, and use whatever combination sounds good. I'd try to do some with garlic, salt and pepper, garlic powder, and some oregano, and serve it with tzatziki. Basically, that would make a ground version of Greek souvlaki (kebabs).

      1. I'd imagine the pork-onion burgers might have seasoning, but not the rest, and all would be uncured. To be sure, break off a tiny piece, sautee, and taste.Ground pork, or the patties broken up, would be good in stir-fried dishes. Cabbage is a natural pairing with pork, and so is fruit - especially apples.

        Personally, I wouldn't turn them into breakfast/Italian sausage meat, which you can easily buy if you want it. I'd take advantage of the opportunity to make dishes that are a little different. No recipe for this, per se, but one idea is to make a cabbage or brussels sprouts soup using chicken stock, onion, carrots, and celery. Make bite-sized pork meatballs using your favorite meatloaf recipe, brown them in a frying pan or the oven, then add them to the soup at the same time as the cabbage/sprouts, so that they will cook through by the time the cabbage/sprouts are tender. Don't overcook them. Using sprouts and thick-sliced carrot coins along with the pork meatballs would
        have a lot of visual appeal....I think when I finish patting myself on the back, I'll make this soup! ;-)

        1. "Fresh" means "uncured" (at least in this context).

          1. Cook the burgers as is - and grill some thinly sliced apple slices alongside to top the burgers (with some melted brie or fontina on the pork burger).

            Use the ground pork mixed with equal parts of ground beef and ground veal for a meatloaf like Mom used to make (when they sold the mixed meat package in the supermarkets). Or at least like my Mom used to make. :-)

            Not sure what you mean by fresh pork patties - pork cutlets?

            1. to figure out if the patties are cured and seasoned or not, take one out of the package and look at it very carefully. if it is seasoned, you will probably see herbs, black pepper, etc in it (unless it is seasoned only with salt and white pepper, but I've not seen patties like that). Sniff it. if it smells like bacon (either salty or smoky) then it is cured. But you'll still need to cook it!

              My question would be, how fatty is the meat? Can you see lots of specks of white fat? If it is very lean, use as you would chicken mince, since it is more likely to dry out. If fattier, it can handle more robust preps and cooking times.

              I buy pork bangers from the butcher, which is quite fatty and seasoned, and remove the casings. The meat makes awesome meatballs (so tender!), great filling for Asian dumplings (with a bit of ginger, garlic, soy, etc) and good hamburger patties.