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English Pudding?

When I visited England (Peterborough) back in 1997, my family and I stayed with friends in their home. One evening, our hostess served us--what I believe to be--English pudding. First, she plated what looked like bread pudding, then poured a custard over that, and then some sort of cream over that. (Is this a common tradition to add custard and cream on top of the pudding, or was it something she just felt like doing?) It was "smack the table" good! It was truly rich and indulgent, but worth it! I've been on the lookout for a recipe like this throughout the years and I would really love to know if someone out there can pinpoint a recipe for the pudding, plus the custard and cream served on top. Thanks!

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  1. It sounds like it might have been bread and butter pudding?

    http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/ri...

    1. What if you made your favorite bread pudding and then poured a custard sauce (creme anglaise) over each serving and added a side of whipped cream (or double cream if you can find some in a specialty store)? Most baking cookbooks would carry some kind of custard sauce.

      1 Reply
      1. re: petitgateau

        That is a great idea! I think I might do that.

      2. Last year, I had lunch with an English friend at The Settler's Inn, in Hawley, PA. This dessert, which she ordered just for nostalgia's sake, turned out to be spectacular - and not nearly as sweet as I feared it would be. The chef was very happy to share the recipe with us, but I've never tried to make it. Soon...

        English Toffee Pudding
        The Settler’s Inn

        Serves 8

        6 tablespoons soft, unsalted butter
        1 cup + 2 tablespoons sugar
        2 medium eggs
        1½ teaspoons vanilla
        1½ cups plus 1½ tablespoons, separated, all-purpose flour
        1½ teaspoons baking powder
        1 heaping cup of chopped dates
        1½ teaspoons baking soda
        2 cups boiling water

        Grease 16 muffin tin cups or a 10-inch deep pie pan. Preheat the oven to 350°.

        In a large mixing bowl, cream together the butter, sugar, eggs and vanilla. Add 1½ cups of the flour and the baking powder and mix on medium speed until blended, scraping down the sides of the bowl occasionally.

        In another bowl, combine the dates, the remaining 1½ tablespoons flour and the baking soda. Pour the 2 cups of boiling water over the top and quickly mix. Then add immediately to the creamed mixture in the first bowl and blend together until just mixed. The mixture will look very watery and will somewhat resemble pig slop. Do not worry. (NOTE: This is a direct quote from the chef, not my commentary!)

        Divide among 16 well-greased muffin tin cups or a 10-inch deep pie pan. Bake at 350° for about 20 minutes, or until puffed and brown. (If using a deep pie pan, it will take about 30 minutes.)

        Serve warm with warm caramel sauce and whipped cream or ice cream.

        The pudding can be frozen and reheated.

        2 Replies
        1. re: Deenso

          That's more commonly known as sticky toffee pudding and was very popular a few years ago. It's one of those desserts that was done to death and no longer appears on many restaurant menus, even though people love it.

          1. re: Deenso

            Thank you for this recipe. I wonder if I can make this and use the custard in place of the caramel. Perhaps it might be TOO rich then?

          2. I grew up in England, and when I think of true English pudding I think of steamed sponge puddings made with suet (which is basically ground hard beef fat). These came in a variety of flavors, but my favorites were Apple and Cinnamon Layer Pudding and, of course, Spotted Dick. I don't even know if the Brits eat this stuff any more because I am sure the food police have cracked down on suit. I know it's bad for you, but it's not like anybody ate it every day and it made the most glorious stick-to-your ribs desert that you could ever imagine.

            Ahhh, what I would give for a good Spotted Dick drowning in custard.......

            1. I just love traveling to the UK and always track down Sticky Toffee Pudding, Banoffee Pie, Bread Pudding, Spotted Dick, etc. I regularly make them at home, too. Am making my husband Sticky Toffee Pudding for his birthday Thursday. Yum!

              1. it's always known as bread and butter pudding in England because if you Google bread pudding you will get recipes for something entirely different which is spicier (allspice, cinnamon, nutmeg etc) and non dairy and a bit of an acquired taste.

                English custard is NOT creme anglaise. English custard is yellow and always made from Bird's custard powder which can be bought in English departments of the supermarket if yours has one or online. It comes in a tin and you mix it with milk and sugar. Creme Anglaise is a French concoction and whilst nice is not the same thing.

                People often offer both custard and cream but you wouldn't normally put them both on your dessert. It would be thick pouring cream (known as double cream and not duplicated in the USA) never whipped cream in England unless used for meringues or eclairs or profiterole fillings etc.

                1 Reply
                1. re: smartie

                  Smartie thank you for this. Now that I think about it, I think I poured both on when they were offered to me, what a faux pas! I was younger then...live and learn. Well, now I'm on the quest for bread and butter pudding and Bird's custard powder. Could I substitute heavy cream for double cream?