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Non-veggie soy suggestions?

k
kbinsted Aug 21, 2008 12:34 PM

I'm participating in a medical study, and am in the "high soy" group, which means I need to eat at least two servings of soy products per day for six months - a *lot* of soy. Most recipes using soy are aimed at vegetarians and lactose-intolerant folk, and I'm neither. Does anyone have any suggestions for interesting, tasty recipes that combine soy (tofu, soy milk, etc) with meat and dairy? I know I can chuck tofu into a regular stir-fry, but I'm looking for something a bit more inspired.

Thanks for any ideas!

Kim.

  1. s
    smtucker Aug 21, 2008 01:10 PM

    There is always this recipe from Top Chef:

    http://recipes.mt.bravotv.com/top_che...

    I think almost any asian stir fry could include tofu combined with meat. In this same vein [culturally]; hot and sour soup has a meat broth with tofu. My sister has soy milk with her morning cereal and uses something called XXXX Balance instead of butter.

    You could sneak tofu into mashed potatoes or mashed cauliflower. Haven't tried it, but mac and cheese with soy milk in the bechamel sauce?

    1 Reply
    1. re: smtucker
      k
      kbinsted Aug 21, 2008 08:24 PM

      Oooh, that Top Chef recipe looks like fun. Have you tried it?

    2. sweetie Aug 21, 2008 01:43 PM

      how about edamame stir fried with bacon or pancetta? or just by themselves. Some times I throw the beans into pasta too, like a oil and garlic one or even carbonera.

      2 Replies
      1. re: sweetie
        k
        kbinsted Aug 21, 2008 08:23 PM

        Sadly, the study has said that edamame and miso don't count, because of the relatively low level of isoflavones (apparently). Pity, as I could eat edamame all day long. Thanks for the thought, though!

        1. re: kbinsted
          sweetie Aug 22, 2008 07:03 AM

          Sorry about the edamame....I just remembered a show on food network Chef at Large. Michael Smith made chocolate mousse using silken tofu. Soy for dessert anyone?

      2. leanneabe Aug 21, 2008 01:46 PM

        A snack of edamame could count as one serving. You could also toss them into a veggie medley as a side to your protein entree.

        As I don't cook with dairy too often to begin with, I'm not sure how to incorporate soy milk into your routine aside from the already mentioned cereal. Most soy milks are flavored, but there is a plain, unsweetened version. Depending on what you want to use it for, make sure you get the right kind. You definitely don't want to make mac 'n cheese with sweetened vanilla soy milk.

        You could do a tofu scramble for breakfast (crumbled tofu in place of the eggs, or even mixed with eggs).

        Firm tofu that's been pressed (to drain excess liquid) grills up very nicely and absorbs marinades perfectly. I know you're not a vegetarian, but it can't hurt to sub it in for meat once in a while.

        My mom used to make a dish with ground pork and tofu - pan fry the pork and add cubes of firm tofu with green onions. Add some oyster sauce and serve over rice. There's also a Chinese dish called mapo tofu that's similar, but I think more spicy.

        4 Replies
        1. re: leanneabe
          k
          kbinsted Aug 21, 2008 08:35 PM

          Thanks for the suggestions! I'm certainly not against veggie meals. It's just that almost all the soy recipes out there are vegan or vegetarian, and I was wondering if Chowhounds knew of any great meat-soy combos. Mapo tofu is an excellent start, thanks.

          1. re: leanneabe
            c
            cimui Aug 22, 2008 07:55 AM

            leanneabe, my mom used to make the same ground pork and tofu dish, I think. This recipe looks like it follows roughly the same steps she used:

            http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Tofu-wit...

            Honestly, kbinsted, you can add tofu to pretty much any regular stirfry that includes meat. Think of it as egg -- just another protein source that goes in alongside whatever else is there.

            You can make tofu "jerky" by slowly drying out slices in the oven at low heat and brushing periodically with a mixture of soy sauce, brown sugar, five spice, and finely minced garlic (optional). It doesn't have to get rock hard -- I prefer it with a little bit of moisture, actually. Slice it further and add to stirfries, along with any non-veggie protein you use. Or just eat it straight as a snack.

            1. re: cimui
              c
              cimui Aug 22, 2008 03:29 PM

              Ah -- this one is really great! Spicy pork with pressed bean curd:

              http://www.tigersandstrawberries.com/...

              (the recipe is near the middle of the page)

            2. re: leanneabe
              Jetgirly Aug 23, 2008 02:22 PM

              I do a "Greek Tofu Scramble"- I press 1/3 of a block of extra-firm tofu to get the water out, then crumble it. In a frying pan I sautee that tofu in olive oil, along with roasted red pepper strips (I roast them myself but you could do canned), chopped (cherry) tomatoes and frozen spinach. While it's on the heat I scramble one egg and add in some herbs- usually oregano, rosemary and black pepper. Once the veggies and tofu are heated through, I pour the egg mix on top and then mix everything so that the egg coats as much as it can. To serve, I put the egg/tofu/veggie mix on a plate, top it with crumbled feta cheese and then squeeze a lemon wedge over the whole thing.

            3. e
              etoiles Aug 22, 2008 12:07 AM

              What about using silken tofu or soy milk to make a smoothie? This would be easy to have for breakfast and would taste good. Also, thin slices of tofu could be added to a lasagna (use meat sauce). I believe I have heard of a meatloaf with tofu added to reduce the fat as well. Good luck!

              1 Reply
              1. re: etoiles
                k
                KTinNYC Aug 22, 2008 03:23 PM

                I do the soy milk smoothie a lot. Banana, frozen blueberries, soymilk and a little o.j.

              2. Candice Aug 22, 2008 01:15 AM

                You can crumble it and add it to a marinara sauce with other ground meat. I also love mapo tofu with ground pork, chicken, or turkey and tofu, secretly made with the House brand sauce too. Tofu crumbled into to other meaty dishes like chorizo and eggs, enchiladas, chili, etc might work, anywhere that you have a full flavored sauce and ground meat or sausage. I've also heard of people blending it and adding it to quiche and other egg based recipes.

                1. j
                  Joebob Aug 22, 2008 01:21 AM

                  Do you have access to fermented black beans? If so, I'll post a v.good Ma Po Tofu recipe. I owe it to opionatedchief anyway.

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: Joebob
                    k
                    kbinsted Aug 22, 2008 01:34 AM

                    Yes, please!

                  2. o
                    oryza Aug 22, 2008 12:39 PM

                    I use extra-firm soy, squeeze moisture out in a cheescloth and mix with ground beef or pork to use in dumplings or even meatballs because I like the mix of firm texture and meaty flavors. You could probably add it to meatloaf, too. And maybe burgers? (I have reservations about that idea, though)

                    1. n
                      nemo Aug 22, 2008 02:59 PM

                      I once made a lemon sponge pie (many recipes abound on line, but I'll post mine if you wish) with soy milk. I think Silk is pretty tasty as a brand. It came out delicious but didn't set up llike a regular recipe. I think there wasn't enough fat in the soy milk. No matter -- the kids finished it for breakfast the next day. Hey, they were at my house on vacation, so we figured it was just a reincarnation of eggs, milk, and toast! You could bake in Pyrex cups in a water bath without crust and wouldn't have to worry about cutting slices.

                      Did anyone mention smoothies?

                      1. Miss Needle Aug 22, 2008 03:12 PM

                        You should definitely look into Asian recipes. As cimui said, Asians use tofu just as another protein source. They don't view it as a meat substitute. Many Chinese stir-fries will call for tofu and meats/seafood. As some have noted, you've got mabo tofu. Then there's a stir-fry with shrimp and tofu. The possibilities are endless. A lot of Korean dishes also mix up tofu with other things. There's a stir-fry of squid, vegetables, and it's served with tofu. A lot of Korean dumplings mix crumbled pressed tofu with their ground meat. There's casseroles with meat/seafood and tofu in it.

                        The dairy/tofu mix is a bit tougher. What I can suggest is to freeze tofu and then thaw it out. It becomes the texture of ground meat. You can form these into patties (may need egg or some binder) and serve it with cheese in a burger format.

                        The thing I'm wondering is that don't these studies have stipulations that you can't change your regular diet too much with the exception of eating tofu? Because if you alter your diet to accommodate this tofu, there may be other factors influencing the outcome (eg. you're eating more vegetables than normal because you're having stir-fries often, etc.).

                        1 Reply
                        1. re: Miss Needle
                          k
                          kbinsted Aug 23, 2008 02:50 AM

                          Your comment about the study parameters is well taken. No, they don't worry about the effects of the substitution on the balance of my diet, nor is it in any way a blind study (I know I'm now in the high soy group). I agree, it's problematic - I just assume (as a passive participant :)) that the experiment design takes these confounding factors into account.

                          Thanks for the pointers!

                        2. LA Buckeye Fan Aug 22, 2008 04:08 PM

                          How about tacos mixing soyrizo and ground pork/chicken/or beef

                          1 Reply
                          1. re: LA Buckeye Fan
                            k
                            kbinsted Aug 23, 2008 02:52 AM

                            Soyrizo - I had never heard of it until now. Thanks!

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