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Question about making savory bread pudding

v
vinosnob Aug 15, 2008 01:39 PM

I've whipped up a mushroom bread pudding before and served it fresh out of the oven, but now I'm thinking about bringing it to a pot luck and reheating it in the oven.

However, I don't have a lot of time the day of the event to prepare the dish so I want to get it done the day before.

Here's my question...

Do you think it's a good or bad idea to let the uncooked bread pudding sit in a fridge overnight and then cook it later that next day?

Would I need to tweak my recipe at all? Maybe toast the bread crumbs?

TIA!

  1. waitress Aug 16, 2008 03:49 PM

    I make my extra stuffing/dressing (depending on where you're from) the day before Thanksgiving every year, pop it in the oven on Turkey Day and it turns out fine. Maybe keep it in a different bowl and give it a good stir and then put it in your baking dish the day of. A savory bread pudding sounds fantastic, please whip up a fattening butter sauce of some sort to add to the caloric intake.

    1. chowser Aug 16, 2008 03:34 PM

      As others have said, overnight is fine since it's how stratas are done. BTW, for the potluck, I cook strata in a crockpot on low and then bring the whole thing to keep it warm (and keep it on warm). It works great since the crockpot provides moist warm heat, as you need for a good custard.

      1. firecooked Aug 16, 2008 03:28 PM

        My bread pudding recipe calls to refrigerate anywhere between 1 hour to overnight... check out the ratio's, I'm sure you can adjust. When I take to a pot-luck, I bake before going, wrap it up, then serve lukewarm, it's even good at room temp.
        http://blog.firecooked.com/2007/12/21...

        1. e
          Erika L Aug 15, 2008 05:30 PM

          I'd think there would be issues with how much liquid the bread soaks up when left overnight v. a few minutes. You might Google some strata recipes--they're pretty similar in that you use bread (albeit in slices) to line a baking pan, put stuff in between the layers (meat, cheese, veggies), then pour an egg/dairy mixture over all, cover it with plastic wrap, and let it sit overnight in the fridge. The whole point of a strata is to give the bread enough time to soak up all the liquid.

          Alternatively, you might try bringing all the ingredients to the potluck (bread cubes, mushroom/dairy/egg mixture in a plastic container), then assembling and baking on-site.

          1. todao Aug 15, 2008 04:38 PM

            I might want to "Tweek" the recipe by reducing any liquids by a couple of tablespoons to make up for the mushroom hydration, but I'd have no problem with holding the prepared dish in the refrigerator overnight. I'd want to make sure I brought it to room temperature before putting it in the oven though.
            "Bread crumbs" in bread pudding? I typically use cubed bread pieces. But if you wantn to toast the bread crumbs I'd see it as an option.

            2 Replies
            1. re: todao
              v
              vinosnob Aug 15, 2008 05:29 PM

              Thanks for your tips; I think you're right about reducing the liquids.

              Oh, and by "Crumbs" I do mean a french or Italian loaf of bread cut into cubes ;)

              1. re: todao
                todao Aug 15, 2008 09:31 PM

                I think Erika L has a good point because, in the main, whether it's a break pudding or a strata, it's essentially a custard based casserole that will honor a wide range of ingredients. I sometimes like to adjust the "soak" time for my bread puddings/stratas to control the texture of the bread. I don't always want it to be soaked through completely. However, for the most part, if your finished dish is a bit wet toward the end of the cooking time you could always increase the time and adjust the temperature accordingly to prevent burning.

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