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Russian Coleslaw [moved from Kosher]

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Several kosher take-out stores have an item they sell as Russian Coleslaw or Diet Russian Coleslaw. It seems to be a sort of coleslaw made from unpeeled cucumbers... tasted quite nice and reputedly much lower calorie count than regular coleslaw (which the kosher places tend to make rather sugary). What do the chowlhounds recommend for making this at home? Chopping long strands of cucumber by hand, or using a mandolin? Flavoring it with a similar dressing used for cabbage based slaw, or first salting it to draw out the moisture... or using a differnt kind of dressing... I looked on the regular boards and they didn;t mention that Russian coleslaw is made of cucumbers so I wondered if this is a kosher take-out store's invention that other places copied.

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  1. I always thought that Russian Coleslaw was prepared exactly the same as regular coleslaw, but substituting shredded cucumbers for the cabbage. In that case, just as regular coleslaw can be made low calorie by reducing the sugar, or using a sugar substitute, and by using low or fat free mayo - Russian Coleslaw can be prepared the same way.
    I think that I would use a shredder or maybe a julienne blade on a food processor, or any other kitchen device that has blades that can shred or julienne.

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    1. re: Bzdhkap

      You are on the right track about the need to first salt the cucumbers. If you don't, you'll end up with soup! I would use smaller, immature greenhouse cucumbers (older cukes will be too watery), and then mandoline them, roll them in salt, invert a plate, place them on the plate, place another plate (also inverted) on top, and let stand 1 or 2 hours. Then rinse them to remove the excess salt. It is not necessary to place a weight over the plate that is covering them, but I suppose it would accelerate the process of getting rid of the excess water.

      I assume the ones you have had are vinegar-based dressing rather than the mayo ones.