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White Miso

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I have a tub of white miso but apart from making soup, I don't know what else to do with it. Any suggestions?

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    1. re: todao

      This recipe is a guaranteed crowd pleaser.

      miso-marinated sea bass with beurre blanc Bon Appétit | December 2001

      Makes 6 servings.

      R.S.V.P.

      Malibu Chan's, Las Vegas, NV
      ingredients
      1 cup mirin (sweet Japanese rice wine)*
      3/4 cup white miso (fermented soybean paste)*
      1/2 cup sake
      1/4 cup sugar
      6 5- to 6-ounce sea bass fillets (each about 1 inch thick)

      1 cup dry white wine
      1/4 cup chopped shallots
      6 garlic cloves, chopped
      1 bay leaf
      1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
      1 cup whipping cream
      5 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
      1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
      preparation
      Whisk mirin, white miso, sake, and sugar in 13x9x2-inch glass baking dish to combine. Add sea bass; turn to coat. Cover fish and refrigerate 2 hours.

      Boil white wine, chopped shallots, chopped garlic, bay leaf, and black peppercorns in heavy large saucepan until reduced to 3/4 cup, about 7 minutes. Add whipping cream and boil until reduced to 1 cup, about 6 minutes. Strain into medium saucepan, pressing on solids. Place over low heat. Add unsalted butter 1 tablespoon at a time, whisking until melted before adding more. Remove from heat. Whisk in fresh lemon juice. Season sauce to taste with salt and pepper. Cover to keep warm.

      Preheat oven to 450°F. Oil rimmed baking sheet. Remove fish from marinade; transfer to prepared sheet. Bake until almost opaque in center, about 10 minutes. Preheat broiler. Broil fish until well-browned on top and opaque in center, watching closely to avoid burning, about 3 minutes. Transfer fish to plates. Spoon sauce around and serve.

      * Mirin and miso are available at Japanese markets and in the Asian foods section of some supermarkets.

      Preheat oven to 450°F. Oil rimmed baking sheet. Remove fish from marinade; transfer to prepared sheet. Bake until almost opaque in center, about 10 minutes. Preheat broiler. Broil fish until well-browned on top and opaque in center, watching closely to avoid burning, about 3 minutes. Transfer fish to plates. Spoon sauce around and serve.

    2. White miso is a bit of a big thing in my town (Kyoto). It has a shorter fermentation period and less salt than the red stuff, so the taste is a little sweeter. The recipe that greenstate put up which included miso, mirin, sake and sugar is very "standard" - and when used for fish is called Saikyoyaki. (Saikyo means Western Capital, c.f. Tokyo which is Eastern Capital; Yaki is grill)

      However, I prefer something called Dengaku, which usually involves eggplant or tofu. The eggplant might benefit from some pre-cooking like deepfrying or grilling with salt. Then smear on a paste made from 2 parts miso, 1 part mirin/sake and a bit of sugar, then grill it until it has some brown bits. You can fling on some sesame seeds or chives or spring onions if you want. Also, you can dump a bit of cheese on there if you want a non-traditional but very tasty concoction.

      http://image.blog.livedoor.jp/take470... (the pic is a red-miso based dengaku, though)

      4 Replies
      1. re: Klimbim78

        Hi Klimbim78,

        Saikyo miso and dengaku are my immediate thoughts on white miso too! I usually like to make two eggplant dengaku, one with red miso and one with white miso as they look pretty on the plate.

        gtrekker2003, you can make the famous Nobu's black cod with miso using the recipe below (click the link of saikyo miso and it will show you how to make it with white miso):
        http://www.myriadrestaurantgroup.com/...

        1. re: kobetobiko

          Hello Kobetobiko!

          Heheh I guess there's not so much else to do with white miso! How do you pre-cook your eggplants? Mine never come out too well.

          I had a look at cookpad.com, a recipe site. It seems you can also use (white) miso in meatballs. The recipe I saw called for minced chicken, miso, mushrooms, corn starch, an egg and onions. Mince the veggies, mix it all into a paste, shape into patties and panfry. If you can get your hands on shiso, you can slap it on top of the patty.

          1. re: Klimbim78

            Hi Klimbim78,

            What was the problem with your eggplants? (flavor? texture?) I don't have an exact recipe per se, I just follow what my mom usually does:
            mix white miso (2 parts) with 1 part sugar, sake, mirin each; add half an egg york until it becomes sort of a paste.

            It's the same for red miso, but instead of 1 part sake, you need 2.

            I usually use Japanese benasu (they are small and fat with very little seeds, not longer and skinny) and I slice it into half lengthwise and spread the white and red miso paste about onto each half of the eggplant

            1. re: kobetobiko

              Do you pre-cook/salt the nasu before spreading the miso? I've seen recipes that do and recipes that don't. My problem is that the flavor doesn't seem to penetrate fully, like they do in the shops.

      2. My favorite way, as some one mentioned below is to marinate fish in it w/ sake, mirin, etc. I like marinating black cod w/ it. It acts as a great tenderizer, and my mom used to take meats that were otherwise tough and marinate it in a miso-based thing, which made the meat very tender.

        The miso will last a very long time (years), so no need to worry about spoiling.

        1. Thanks everybody. These ideas look great.

          Couple questions:
          1) Can I substitute anything for the sake or mirin? I can't use alcohol.

          2) For the eggplants, do you just cut the regular eggplant in half?

          1 Reply
          1. re: gtrekker2003

            Hmm. That's a tough one. For the mirin, the real kind is just distilled sweet rice (or whatever grain), but a lot of the cheaper "mirin-style" I think don't actually have alcohol. Check the label, b/c there are dizzying numbers of the various types of mirin/mirin-style liquids.

            A quick google search yielded this site: http://cookiemonzters.blogspot.com/20...
            which says that rice vinegar is a good substitute for sake. If you do that, though, I would increase the sugar somewhat and maybe not use so much vinegar? However, the other thing to keep in mind is that the mirin will have quite a bit of sweetness.

            If all else fails, the miso alone will be a good tenderizer, so perhaps mix w/ the fake (non-alcoholic) mirin-style whatever, add a small bit of vinegar?

          2. it is also good in salad dressings, i ix it into various sauces and sautees... forget just traditional applications, there are endless uses for miso

            1. Off the top of my head:

              Add to some soups other than miso, such as winter squash soups
              Thinly spread on sandwiches, such as with tempeh.
              Many salad dressings, esp. those with tahini.
              In a marinade for tofu.
              In a dip for shrimp, seared beef, etc. If you like heat, add some Thai chili paste...

              1. Here is one of my favorite recipes - It is super easy and so yummy! It goes great with Wasabi Mashed Potatoes and Shittake - Nori Gravy! mmmm.

                1. Here is one of my favorite recipes - It is super easy and so yummy! It goes great with Wasabi Mashed Potatoes and Shittake - Nori Gravy! mmmm.
                  Miso Glazed Tempeh or Tofu.

                  Ingredients:

                  Tempeh or Tofu Cutlets.

                  White miso paste.

                  Maple syrup.

                  Mirin (cooking sake).

                  Sesame seeds (black and white).

                  Lemons or Oranges.

                  Sesame oil.

                  Jasmine tea bags.

                  Green onions.

                  Directions.

                  Preheat oven to 350.

                  Place Tempeh/Tofu in a 2 inch pan or other pyrex container with walled sides, NO cookie sheets. Leave space between cutlets.

                  In a mixing bowl, mix 1 part miso paste with 1/2 part maple syrup.

                  Add a splash of sesame oil and a splash of mirin.

                  Whisk ingredients together into a smoothish consistency and taste. It should be somewhat sweet and not too salty...

                  You need enough to be able to spoon a not too thick layer of glaze onto the top of each piece of Tempeh/Tofu with a little left over in the bowl.

                  Add tea bags to the bowl with the remaining glaze and add boiling water to the bowl so you now have a 'tea' of Jasmine and miso glaze....

                  Ladle this tea into the pan just about 1/2 way up the sides of the Tempeh/Tofu.

                  Take care not to disturb the glazed cutlets while ladling.

                  This will keep them from drying out.

                  Place a very thin slice of lemon or orange on the center of each cutlet and sprinkle the sesame seeds lightly onto each cutlet as a garnish.

                  Cover the pan and bake for 30 min...then remove cover and bake for 10 more min or so 'till the glaze looks carmelized and somewhat dry.

                  Scatter some finely chopped green onion onto the cutlets just before serving.

                  Enjoy!