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amsterdam: where to buy licorice and stroopwaffel

d
david kaplan Jul 12, 2008 08:59 PM

I'm visiting Amsterdam and would like to bring home some salty licorice and some stroopwaffeln. Where are good places to buy high-quality versions of both? I'm staying in the Pijp but can get pretty much anywhere in the city.

  1. w
    wafelmagnet Jan 19, 2013 03:18 PM

    I wanted to update this discussion and thank those who posted here in the past, if they are still around.

    As of January 17, 2013, there is still a guy at Albert Cuyp Market making these wafels and they are delicious. I will never go to Amsterdam again without having one of these wafels.

    The description above of his location was fairly accurate still. The closest street address to his stall was 182 Albert Cuypstraat, which I believe is Bazar Amsterdam. The booth was on the south side of the street. If you search for that address, you should find it.

    I highly recommend the chocolate dipped version! He also has them bagged up and they survived the trip home and even a couple of days later are still tastier and fresher than the ones at Trader Joe's.

    I should also say that they still are serving these at Lanskroon -- I found that as well from this thread. And while those are good, they are a very different affair from the ones at the market. It's a good idea to try both, though I don't think anything can compare to the ones at the market.

    Thanks again!

    1 Reply
    1. re: wafelmagnet
      w
      wafelmagnet Jan 19, 2013 03:23 PM

      Photo showing the giant wafel, made extra big because it's in the foreground, but it is really big -- much bigger than the ones from Trader Joe's. Also shows the booth in the background. Good luck to all those stroopwafel hunters out there!

       
    2. d
      david kaplan Jul 18, 2008 07:54 PM

      Here's my report on stroopwafels:

      I finally found the guy making them at the Albert Cuypmarkt. He's there only Wednesday-Saturday, on the south side of the street, about halfway. It was fun watching him press the dough into the wafflemaker and then smear syrup on it. The resulting wafel is large, soft, floppy, and gooey from the fresh honey syrup. He also has bagged premade wafels, similar in size to those sold at Albert Heijn; I didn't try those.

      I also went to Lanskroon bakery, at Singel 385. Lanskroon has two types: honey and coffee-caramel. Their wafels are sturdy disks, somewhat crunchy, and quite buttery. I loved these and rank these above those at the Cuypmarkt, though they're very different styles and perhaps not fair to compare. At Lanskroon, the server packed 8 wafels for me to travel home with, and three days and 5000+ miles later, they remain delicious and retain their crunchy texture. I can't wait to return to Lanskroon someday.

      3 Replies
      1. re: david kaplan
        j
        josephnl Jul 18, 2008 09:25 PM

        I'm glad that you got to Lanskroon. I think I was the one who originally recommended it. I used to go to Amsterdam quite frequently as part of my business travel, and always stayed at my favorite hotel the Ambassade, just around the corner from Lanskroon. I often walked by the bakery and could rarely resist stopping in for a stroopwaffel. As you now know, it's a small place, but there stroopwaffels are great.

        Where did you think they had the best chocolates. Did you get to Pompadour...it's my favorite?

        1. re: josephnl
          d
          david kaplan Jul 19, 2008 05:57 AM

          I did not get to Pompadour. My chocolate sampling was limited to Puccini Bomboni and a slagroom (whipped cream) truffle at Lanskroon. The slagroom truffle is a thick whipped cream coated in a medium-thin chocolate shell, and I wish I could have taken hundreds of those home with me.

          I like the fluffy style of Puccini Bomboni's ganache and the range of their herbal and spicy flavors. Of those I sampled this trip, anise and cinnamon were my favorite. I also liked the crunch of the caramel truffle, which had chocolate sprinkles on the shell and large-grain sugar crystals in the ganache, but it was a little unwieldy to eat.

          I stayed in De Pijp, so Lanskroon was a special trip, but had I stayed nearby it would have been a once-or-more-per-day stop.

          1. re: david kaplan
            zuriga1 Jul 21, 2008 01:06 AM

            Thanks for your feedback, David. So many people never write to say where they ended up or what they enjoyed. Now I know to try Lanskroon on my next trip to Amsterdam!

      2. Klary Jul 18, 2008 05:51 AM

        You can buy licorice at every supermarket, both the sweet and the salty kind. A great place for licorice and lots of other old fashioned Dutch candy (anise and cinnamon flavored candy, peardrops, honey licorice, hopjes (coffee candy) and many more) is the spice shop on Albert Cuypstraat 150, De Peperbol. The candy is sold inside, near the cashier.
        The stroopwafel guy on the Albert Cuyp market also sells packaged stroopwafels to take home, and they are much better than the Albert Heijn kind.

        1. zuriga1 Jul 14, 2008 06:24 AM

          Puccini Bomboni is my favourite (I dream about their chocolates), but I've also heard that Arti Chocolate is another very good shop. Sadly, I didn't get there on my last trip. I think it's located somewhere in the area of the Concert Hall.

          1 Reply
          1. re: zuriga1
            j
            josephnl Jul 14, 2008 11:11 AM

            Pompadour chocolates are also wonderful. I personally like them better than Puccini, but of course it's a matter of taste. David, when you are at Lanskroon, why not take a 5 minute walk to Pompadour, and just have a sample?

            Have fun...my mouth's watering!

          2. markemorse Jul 14, 2008 12:00 AM

            These are great suggestions, I usually recommend that if people really like stroopwaffles, then you should do all three: pick up the industrial mass-market kind (that you can find everywhere, might as well get Albert Heijn's); go to Lanskroon; and go to the stroopwafel man at the Albert Cuypmarkt. If you still can't get enough, maybe even pick up some organic stroopwaffles at the Natuurwinkel (the one on Van Woustraat is closest to David)....

            For chocolates, in addition to Puccini and Pompadour I would also recommend Unlimited Delicious on the Haarlemmerstraat, also experimenting with herbal and spice flavors but with greater variation from piece to piece than I think Puccini offers.

            5 Replies
            1. re: markemorse
              d
              david kaplan Jul 14, 2008 12:16 AM

              Why not try them all?

              Will it be easy to find the stroopwafel man at the Albert Cuypmarkt? As I walk from Ferdinand Bolstraat toward Van Woustraat, will he be on the left or right, and near the beginning or end of the walk? Thank you.

              1. re: david kaplan
                markemorse Jul 14, 2008 12:42 AM

                He's got a small stand but it's pretty easy to find....I'm almost sure he's on the right hand side if you're walking from Ferdinand Bol to Van Wou, and he's somewhere near the 2e van der Helsstraat, so about in the middle of the walk. Good luck! It's beautiful weather for stroopwafel hunting!

                ETA: I did forget to stress that these are not the kind of thing you can bring home....these are fresh, gooey, HOT wafels....

                1. re: markemorse
                  d
                  david kaplan Jul 14, 2008 12:55 AM

                  And that's why I appreciate the multiple suggestions. I was hoping for a gooey, hot version to eat here (many times this week!) and another source for wafels to travel home with. Do you know if Lanskroon is packaged for travel, or would I be better off with Albert Heijn?

                  1. re: david kaplan
                    markemorse Jul 14, 2008 01:06 AM

                    I think that the Lanskroon ones would travel fine, or as well as any freshly baked good. In contrast, you could probably step on your bag of Albert Heijn stroopwafels and not hurt them.

                    Which I guess highlights the difference between them: Lanskroon's look like they've been made by humans and are comparatively fragile. These are the ones I would bring home for someone who cared about food....if I was bringing home "token gesture sweets" for young kids I might settle for Albert Heijn's....(;->)

                  2. re: markemorse
                    v
                    valerie Jul 14, 2008 10:53 AM

                    "It's beautiful weather for stroopwafel hunting!"

                    We were in Amsterdam from July 5th to July 11th -- weather stunk with lots of rain! Oh well.

                    I'm sorry I didn't know about Lanskroon before we left -- I would have tried it out. The ones in the package were okay, but I couldn't understand what all the fuss was about. And I forgot to look for the guy when we strolled through Albert Cuyp.

              2. j
                josephnl Jul 13, 2008 09:40 AM

                There is a small bakery right near Spui square (where Cafe Hoppe and Grand-Cafe Luxembourg are located) that makes there own wonderful stroopwaffels. I don't know the name of this small bakery, but if you take the narrow street between these famous cafes and head towards the Singel canal (it's just a stone's throw!) on a corner, on the near right you will find this small bakery which always displays stroopwaffels in the window. They're the best, and I always bring some home.

                I always stay at the Ambassade Hotel on the Herengracht about two minutes away from the bakery. In the opposite direction from Spui, towards Kaisersgracht, there is an incredible chocolate shop which is an absolute favorite. They may have licorice too, but you will die over the chocolates. I can't think of the name of the shop, but I am sure that if you drop into the Ambassade, one of the incredibly accommodating persons working at the desk will know about the chocolate shop and can direct you there. It also is only two minutes away.

                If you ever need a hotel in Amsterdam, I cannot recommend the Ambassade highly enough. It has wonderful charm, overlooks the canal, and terrific staff. It is not cheap, but very fairly priced.

                3 Replies
                1. re: josephnl
                  v
                  valerie Jul 13, 2008 12:18 PM

                  I just returned from Amsterdam on Friday (full report to come) and I think the chocolate shop that you may be referring to is Puccini Bomboni on Singel. We passed by, but they were closed at the time and we never got a chance to go back.

                  http://www.puccinibomboni.com/

                  As far as stroopwaffel, I saw it everywhere. I only bought it once, so I don't know good from bad, but it was in a lot of stores, even including Albert Heijn (supermarket).

                  1. re: valerie
                    j
                    josephnl Jul 13, 2008 12:38 PM

                    Puccini is indeed excellent for chocolates, but I just figured out the chololate shop that I like even better...it's really amazing!! It is Pompadour Chocolates at Huidenstraat 12, a 5 minute walk from Spui square.

                    Also, by reviewing old photos, I was able to identify the bakery that makes wonderful stroopwaffelen. It is Lanskroon and its website with address (on Singel canal, around the corner from Spui square) is www.lanskroon.nl
                    The stroopwaffelen there are far superior to the prepackaged variety you see all over and which are available at Schiphol.

                  2. re: josephnl
                    d
                    david kaplan Jul 13, 2008 01:45 PM

                    Thank you for the Lanskroon recommendation. I was planning on trying the stroopwaffel made by the vendor on Albert Cuypmarket tomorrow, and then perhaps on Tuesday or Wednesday I will compare at Lanskroon.

                    For chocolate, I do love Puccini -- I am always drawn to spice and herb flavors in chocolate. They have another location on Staalstraat.

                  3. zuriga1 Jul 13, 2008 04:51 AM

                    I've seen stroopwaffeln at the Albert Cuypstraat market, but I'm fairly sure you can also buy some at Schiphol if you're flying home from Amsterdam. The salty licorice is sold under the Haribo label if you can find that. I've seen it here in the UK, but maybe it's also at the airport. Ask for Double Z licorice (so I'm told) (the salt is ammonium chloride).

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