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Barbera or Sangiovese with pizza?

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  • Diana Jul 2, 2008 11:53 AM
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This isn't a super duper batali-Mozza-Esque Pizza, but it ain't Domino's, either. Cheese, tomato sauce, probably stuff like mushrooms, eggplant, garlic, onions and stuff (no meat)

So a good italian barbera or a Domestic Sangio?

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  1. "...or a DOMESTIC Sangio..."

    You made this very easy. Barbera.

    6 Replies
    1. re: whiner

      whiner wins! :-)

      1. re: whiner

        True, but I found Kalyra Sangiovese to be darn good for a domestic!

        1. re: Diana

          "True, but I found Kalyra Sangiovese to be darn good for a domestic!"

          if you have to include any sentence with "it's good FOR A", run in the opposite direction.

          cheers

          1. re: TBird

            That would be odd, me starting sentences in front of people and then dashing away.

            It was a good bottle. Not the same as an import, but easily drinkable.

            1. re: Diana

              hey, it's your palate. have at it.
              :-)

              1. re: TBird

                sometime, you gotta have a Hershey bar..or worse, Russel Stover.

      2. How about a nice Zinfandel? Something not too heavy, like Seghesio or Ravenswood Sonoma County?

        1. Which Barbera? Which Sangiovese? If the answer is "I don't know; I haven't purchased it yet," then go off the board with Zinfandel or an Irpinia IGT or Aglianico wine from Italy. Vesevo is a very affordable producer of the latter two types.

          1 Reply
          1. re: Brad Ballinger

            Agree with this wholeheartedly. Pizza time is also about the only time I really enjoy a glass of Chianti Riserva.

          2. Try them both and see what you like the best.

            1. Diana, unless you live in Italy and "Domestic Sangio" means one grown and produced in Italy . . . "whiner" is right: it's a no brainer. Go with the Barbera!

              Every time.

              OTOH, Brad is also right on. If you have yet to purchase anything, keep in mind that Zinfandel CAN -- depending upon its style -- also make an excellent match with pizza.

              Cheers,
              Jason

              15 Replies
              1. re: zin1953

                Barbera over US Sangiovese every time.

                And the wine doesn't have to be fancy -- even basic Chianti Classico works with pizza. Aglianico is a good suggestion, too. I nearly always go Italian with pizza.

                Some Zins, as Zin says, go with pizza but not all pizzas...and probably not the pizza Diana has described. I've found that Zin pairs well with pizza with assertive toppings -- salami, strong cheeses, olives, etc -- and two toppings in particular: caramelized onions and basil. Pesto, with basil and Parm and its particular pungent spike of garlic, works…if you were at all considering a pesto pizza.

                Off-topic: Diana, you probably know this, but just in case: Watch the water content of all those toppings. Make sure the eggplant, mushrooms, onions, etc., are all thoroughly cooked and rid of their water content before using them as toppings...unless you like a soggy crust.

                1. re: maria lorraine

                  What domestic Barbera? When I went to K&L’s website, they only list one from the U.S. (CA), 2006 Unti Dry Creek. Is that that a good one to have with this dish? There were 23 from the Piedmont, Italy. Do you have a specific Barbera in mind?

                  1. re: BN1

                    Sorry I'm not understanding your post, BN1...the discussion was choosing between Italian Barbera or domestic Sangiovese...

                    1. re: maria lorraine

                      Thanks! Sorry, I misread the post. I love Italian Barbera.

                      1. re: BN1

                        At a fancy-schmany wine benefit a few years, after tasting some beautiful limited production wines, I came upon the Sebastiani (Sonoma) table. I tried the Barbera -- great stuff, reasonably priced (aboaut $17 a bottle). I was, to put it midly, floored. I've tried the Unti -- it didn't have that nice stone-fruit character I love about Italian Barbera. I don't know if this Barbera is still as good as it once was, but perhaps it's worth a shot. Cellar Tracker notes here:
                        http://www.cellartracker.com/list.asp...

                    2. re: BN1

                      There are several California producers of Barbera -- and even more in the past -- but the problem historically has been that most were not Barbera. That said, the Unti is (IMHO) one of, if not the best Barbera made in California.

                      For pizza, buy one from Piedmont.

                      1. re: zin1953

                        I love Barbera from the Piedmont but have been under-whelmed by the CA examples I have tried. I will definitely try Unti. Thank you.

                        1. re: BN1

                          As I said, most aren't Barbera . . .

                          I've had probably 5-6 TRULY STUNNING "Barberas" from California -- none of which were Barbera, but each was an amzing bottle of wine!

                          1. re: zin1953

                            OK, I'll bite....what were they?

                            1. re: maria lorraine

                              For example, very little Barbera was grown in Napa and Sonoma. There was some planted west of the town of Sonoma by Sebastiani, and some planted up at Monte Rosso by Louis M. Martini.

                              Both wineries blended other varieties into their varietally labeled Barbera (remember, prior to 1973, the labeling laws only required 51 percent content). Martini used to blend in Central Valley Barbera with the Monte Rosso-grown Barbera (their wine carried a "California" appellation), and both wineries would blend in grapes such as (but not limited to) Zinfandel, Petite Sirah, and Ruby Cabernet.

                              Heitz Cellars used to sell a Barbera that carried a "P&B" line that read "Bottled by Heitz Winery, Sonoma, CA." They bought it from Sebastiani.

                              In the mid-1970s, when Gallo introduced their first edition of cork-finished varietal wines, they offered exciting wines like French Colombard, Emerald Riesling, Ruby Cabernet, and Barbera -- all with a "California" appellation, all mostly Central Valley grapes. Even though the varietal limit was raised to 75 percent, there was still lots of Ruby Cab, Zin and other Davis-developed hybrids . . . .

                              Monteviña made Barbera from Amador sources in the late-1970s. Whether it was the "Amador Terroir" or not, I don't know, but it sure tasted as though the wine had a substantial dollop of Amador Zin in it . . . .

                              And so it goes.

                              Cheers,
                              Jason

                        2. re: zin1953

                          I've had Barberas from Seghesio (the CA Seghesio, not the IT Seghesio) which I've thought were very good, but never really educated myself on the contents. They also do a sangiovese which I thought was very good for CA sangiovese.

                      2. re: maria lorraine

                        "Some Zins, as Zin says, go with pizza but not all pizzas...and probably not the pizza Diana has described. I've found that Zin pairs well with pizza with assertive toppings -- salami, strong cheeses, olives, etc -- and two toppings in particular: caramelized onions and basil. Pesto, with basil and Parm and its particular pungent spike of garlic, works…if you were at all considering a pesto pizza. "

                        I always go Italian with pizza... but for some reason this paragraph has me salavating at the thought of a Rafanelli Zin with pesto pizza with caramelized onions...

                        THANKS, Maria ;-) :p

                        1. re: maria lorraine

                          trust me, this place does veggie topping right! PRe cooked (some are grilled)

                          1. re: Diana

                            Good...it wasn't clear from your original post. Hope it all turns out well.

                        2. re: zin1953

                          I've actually had some domestic sangiovese and barbera that is pretty good. It's almost always limited runs from small producers in Washington.

                        3. barbera... valpolicella.... a fruity zin is good too....

                          1 Reply
                          1. re: Chicago Mike

                            Second the Valpo

                          2. The Vino Noceto Linsteadt Barbera and Wilderotter Barbera
                            are 2 pretty good California Barberas, but I do not believe
                            they can be found in stores.

                            1. OK, so my Two cellar Barbara d'AZlba choices are:

                              a 2002 Tenuta Carretta

                              or

                              a 2004 Cascina Val Del Prete "Serra de' Gatti, (estate bottled by Roagna Mario)

                              Any ideas? Otherwise, I flip a coin!

                              1 Reply
                              1. re: Diana

                                last night with two pies(lucali's) and a calzone:

                                2002 Luna Vineyards Sangiovese<---american!
                                2006 Elyse Couzins<---zin blend
                                2006 Di Majo Norante Sangiovese Terre degli Osci IGT
                                2006 Aldo e Riccardo Seghesio Barbera d'Alba

                                the american sangio held it's own. i eat my words. and alot of pizza!