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Need help with cellaring or drinking now - have list

I've loved wine and collected it for the past 8 years or so. I know what I like and when I want a glass, I open one of my bottles and drink it. I have a few bottles that I know are on the pricier side (at least for me) and need help. Does anyone have an idea of whether or not these need to be opened now or in the near future or if they should be cellared for a few more? Any info you have would be great - thank you so much.

2001 Stags Leap Cab Sav
2000 Silver Oak Cab Sav
2003 Valeriano
2004 Outpost The Other Petite Syrah
2002 Braida Brachetto d'Acqui
2004 Justin Cab Sav
2005 Sequoia Grove Cab Sav
2006 Moshin Vineyards Pinot Noir
2002 Charles Krug Generations
1995 Alexander Valley Vineyards Library Reserve Cab Sav

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  1. Part of this is personal preference, but there is nothing on your list that I, personally, would feel the need to age longer. I am not familiar with the Valeriano, though.

    1. "I know what I like and when I want a glass, I open one of my bottles and drink it."

      Then why are you posting? I'm sorry to be so blunt, but the response to most questions about whether to open now or later depends on what you prefer in wine. Do you like your wines young, with some age, with a lot of age?

      Anyway... Brachetto d'Acqui isn't usually aged. And your 1995 is probably as good as it's going to get, but may hold steady for a while depending on cellar conditions.

      Stag's Leap Winery or Stag's Leap Wine Cellars?
      Silver Oak Alexander Valley or Silver Oak Napa Valley?

      In both instances, most people usually lay down the latter longer than the former.

      Like whiner, I've not heard of Valeriano either.

      1 Reply
      1. re: Brad Ballinger

        Not to be OCD, but it's Stags' Leap Winery and Stag's Leap Wine Cellars.
        That little apostrophe caused many a big battle back in the day.

      2. Here's one way to approach it:

        DRINK NOW: The 2002 Brachetto and the 1995 AVV Library

        CELLAR: Everything else. Try a bottle of the Pinot in 2011, and the cabs, red blends, and petite syrah starting around 8 to 10 years from vintage.

        This all assumes you have reasonably good cellaring conditions.

        1. I'm with Brad . . .

          The best wine in the world is the one YOU like the most, consumed the way YOU like to consume it. Whether that's young or old, chilled or with ice in it DOESN"T MATTER . . . as long as you like it that way.

          Cheers,
          Jason

          9 Replies
          1. re: zin1953

            I'm with Zin and Brad on this one as well.....no way for anyone to tell you when you are going to like the wine. Here is my take just by looking at your list, all California so you probably, (I am saying probably) like primary fruit so I would start drinking those now. I work in a wine store and have many a sad story of people laying down wines only to find they dont like what happens to it...Silver Oak has broken many a heart around these parts. Open the oldest one and see if you even like wine with some age on it...some people simply don't.
            Good luck.

              1. re: Heyteacher

                My pleasure! When you open one of the bottles let me know you impressions, not asking for tasting notes per se just if you found it pleasent or not....might be able to help with the rest of the list after that.

                1. re: bubbles4me

                  I'm going to open one tonight with dinner so I will let you know!

            1. re: zin1953

              Thanks guys. I know it's what I like but since a few are fairly expensive (they were gifts), I just didn't want to open too early and miss out.

              1. re: Heyteacher

                Miss out on what?

                None of the California wines are OTH, and except for the Brachetto d'Acqui (which is usually consumed in its youth) and the Valeriano (which I, to, have never heard of), all should (presuming good storage) should be in fine condition.

                Whether you like the wines or not is another issue entirely . . .

                You say that you know what you like. Well, what DO you like? Are these wines similar to the wines you know you like? And -- just for the sake of complete information, is it

                -- Stag's Leap Wine Cellars or Stags' Leap Winery?
                -- Silver Oak's Cabernet from the Alexander Valley AVA or from the Napa Valley AVA?
                -- Moshin's 2006 Pinot Noir from the Sonoma Coast AVA? from the Russian River Valley AVA? or is it the Molinari Vineyard bottling?

                And are you sure the Sequoia Grove is the 2005???

                1. re: zin1953

                  Yes, the SG is the 2005 Cabernet.
                  It's Stags' Leap 2001 Napa Valley Cabernet
                  Silver Oak 2000 Alexander Valley Cabernet
                  Moshin 2006 Molinari Vineyard Sonoma

                  1. re: Heyteacher

                    The Silver Oak Alex should be opened asap. It wasn't a great vintage, and the wine is already past prime, in my opinion. It may be enjoyable to you if you enjoy an extremely light bodied cab. I found there was still a decent nose to it, but the body has all but disappeared (last tasted a month or so ago). It's not my favorite wine to begin with, but it's "evolved" into something one-dimensional.

                    1. re: invinotheresverde

                      Yup, that 2000 Silver Oak isn't going to get any better, only worse. 2000 was hit hard by rains right at harvest...and the red grapes suffered a lot of mold.

            2. Consider CellarTracker! as a source. Eric annoys you by asking for a $35 a year contribution, but you can actually sign up and use it for free. There's drinking windows for the wines in there and you can see tasting notes by others on the wines you own.

              1 Reply
              1. re: SteveTimko

                Agree with Steve re CellarTracker; obviously one likely does not know the particular preferences of those who post their own TNs but the TNs can still be very enlightening

              2. To give you some advice for the 2006 Moshin it would make
                a lot of difference to know if it is the Lot4 or Family Reserve
                (cellar for a few years) or Russian River or Sonoma Coast (closer
                to consumption).

                As for the Valeriano, you are really talking about the
                Jacuzzi Valeriano which is a Carneros version of
                a super Tuscan. I visited Jacuzzi last year and
                my impression is that it would be a mistake to
                keep its wines too long. This is a new winery with relatively
                immature vines (compared to Cline) and it has still a long
                way to go before it makes really top wines. In any case, I
                thought the Jacuzzi sangiovese and barbera were rather
                mediocre.

                Jacuzzi was started by the founder of Cline Cellars.
                Cline's wines are a much better bet, in particular
                the Small Berry Mourvedre and some of its
                Zinfandels, which use very old vines.